Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Andrew Baynton

Andrew Baynton met with Sir Henry Knyvet and Stephen Gardiner at a council at Ratisbone. 1583, p. 1786.

 
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Edward Seymour

(1506? - 1552)

Duke of Somerset (1547 - 1552) [DNB]

Edward Seymour was the patron of Robert Ferrar. 1563, p. 1098; 1570, p. 1722; 1576, pp. 1470-71; 1583, p. 1553.

Seymour signed a royal dispensation of 5 August 1550 permitting Hooper to be consecrated without having to wear vestments. 1563, p. 1050; 1570, p. 1676; 1576, p. 1403 [recte 1430]; 1583, p. 1504).

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

 
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Gasparo Contareni

(1483 - 1542). [H. Hillerbrand (ed.), The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation, 1996]

Cardinal.

Contarene entrusted Ludovico to acquire answers to the pope's letters to Stephen Gardiner. 1583, p. 1786.

 
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Ludovico

Italian merchant or banker.

Ludovico met with William Wolfe. 1583, p. 1786.

He was entrusted by Cardinal Contarene to acquire answers to the pope's letters to Stephen Gardiner. 1583, p. 1786.

Ludovico spoke with Sir Henry Knyvet. 1583, pp. 1786-87.

[Also referred to by Foxe as Ludovick.]

 
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Sir Edward Baynton

(1495? - 1544) [Bindoff, Commons]

Anne Boleyn's vice-chamberlain. [Wabuda, Preaching During the English Reformation, p. 124.]

Edward Baynton wrote to and received a letter from Hugh Latimer. 1563, pp. 1321-25, 1570, pp. 1913-16, 1576, pp. 1326-32, 1583, pp. 1748-51.

Latimer wrote a letter to Edward Baynton. 1563, pp. 1321-25, 1583, pp. 1743-48.

Baynton replied to Latimer's letter. 1563, p. 1326, 1570, p. 1913, 1576, p. 1639, 1583, p. 1748.

Latimer answered Baynton's reply. 1563, pp. 1326-32, 1570, pp. 1913-16, 1576, pp. 1639-43, 1583, pp. 1748-51.

Baynton heard of Henry Knyvet's meeting with Ludovico from Knyvet. 1583, pp. 1786-87.

 
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Sir Henry Knyvet

In his Paul's Cross sermon of 2 December 1554, Stephen Gardiner stated that he and ‘M. Knevet' were sent as ambassadors to the Holy Roman Emperor (1563, p. 1019; 1570, p. 1651; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 4179 [recte 1479]).

In 1541, Gardiner and Sir Henry Knyvet had been sent as ambassadors to the Diet of Regensburg and Kynvet stayed on as ambassador to Charles V. Towards the end of April 1554, Henry VIII instructed Gardiner and Knyvet to ask Charles to arbitrate between England and the papacy as Gardiner describes in his sermon (Glyn Redworth, In defence of the Church Catholic (Oxford, 1990), pp. 130, 137-38 and 149).

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Sir John Barkerly

Sir John Barkerly met with Sir Henry Knyvet and Stephen Gardiner at a council at Ratisbone. 1583, p. 1786.

He was told of Knyvet's meeting with Ludovico by Knyvet. 1583, pp. 1786-87.

 
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Sir John Cheke

(1514 - 1557)

Tutor to Edward VI, privy councillor under Edward VI. [DNB]

Sir John Cheke was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

Cheke was placed in the Tower on 28 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

Actions were taken by Stephen Gardiner against Cheke. 1563, p. 1382, 1570, p. 1951, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1785.

When Cheke was in Germany he was greatly esteemed by the Germans. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

He travelled with Sir Peter Carew from High Germany to Brussels, having checked his route by the stars. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

He was famous for his knowledge of astronomy. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Cheke had safe passage from King Philip, with Lord Paget and Sir John Mas securing their safety. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

He arrived in Brussels to see the queen's ambassadors. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Having seen Paget safely off to England, Carew and Cheke were taken en route between Brussels and Antwerp. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Cheke was shipped to the Tower of London in dreadful conditions. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Feckenham spoke up in defence of Cheke. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Cheke recanted but was so remorseful that he became sick and died. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Nicholas Carre wrote a letter to John Cheke about Martin Bucer which was then passed on to Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1957.

[Also referred to as 'Sir John Cheeke']

 
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Sir Thomas Smith

(1513 - 1577)

Statesman and scholar. Author of De republica Anglorum (DNB)

Sir Thomas Smith was provost of Eton when Robert Smith was in his service. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Actions were taken by Stephen Gardiner against Thomas Smith. 1563, p. 1382, 1570, p. 1951, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1785.

He was cited to appear before the queen?s commissioners on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He was the author of a prayer for the health of Queen Mary and her conceived child printed by Foxe (1563, pp. 1016-17; 1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1410; 1583, p. 1481). [NB: Smith is only identified as the author in the 1563 edition].

 
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Sir Thomas Wyatt

(1521? - 1554) (DNB)

Sir Thomas Wyatt was the king's ambassador to the emperor before Sir Henry Knyvet. Wyatt's servant William Wolfe was taken on by Knyvet as steward of his household. 1583, p. 1786.

In 1554 Sir Thomas Wyatt led a rebellion in Kent against Mary, provoked by fear that Mary's marriage to Philip would 'bring upon this Realme most miserable and establish popish religion'. The duke of Norfolk was sent against Wyatt but Norfolk's followers deserted and he retreated.

Wyatt advanced on London in February 1554. Wyatt could not gain entry into London and was resisted and apprehended at the Temple Bar. Wyatt was executed. Foxe promises to relate a story about the removal of Wyatt's head from the spike on Hay Hill where it was displayed, but he never did (1563, pp. 916-17; 1570, pp. 1579-80; 1576, pp. 1347-48; and 1583, pp. 1418-19).

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In 1570 et seq. Foxe prints an account of Mary's oration - there is an earlier, different version of this speech in 1563, pp. 1730-31 - at the London Guildhall denouncing Wyatt. Foxe's marginal notes to this speech, in 1570 et seq., defend Wyatt against Mary's charge that Wyatt looted Southwark (1570, p. 1580; 1576, p. 1348; and 1583, p. 1418).

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Foxe states that Wyatt, at his own request, spoke with Edward Courtenay on the day of his execution and, before the Lieutenant of the Tower, got down on his knees and begged forgiveness of Courtenay for having falsely accused both him and Elizabeth of involvement in his rebellion (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; 1583, p. 1425). [It is reported elsewhere that Wyatt did speak with Courtenay on the day of his execution, but what they said is not known; see J. G. Nichols, (ed.), The Chronicle of Queen Jane and of two years of Queen Mary, (London, 1850) Camden Society Original series 48, pp. 72-73].

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Wyatt also allegedly proclaimed from the scaffold that Elizabeth and Courtenay were innocent of any complicity in his crimes, but Hugh Weston who was also standing on the scaffold cried out to the crowd that Wyatt had confessed otherwise to the Privy Council (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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Sir Martin Bowes informed Sir Thomas White that he had heard a report circulating at Westminster, that Wyatt had urged Courtenay to confess the truth (1570, pp. 1587- 88; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

During the Star Chamber trial of one Cut, who was charged with sedition for claiming that Wyatt (on the scaffold) had cleared Elizabeth and Courtenay of any complicity in his rebellion, Sir John Brydges, who was present at Wyatt's interview with Courtenay, claimed that Wyatt begged Courtenay to confess the truth and seek the Queen's mercy (1570, p. 1588; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, pp. 1425-26).

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Foxe declares that he will pass over Wyatt's rebellion, as it has been dealt with in more detail elsewhere (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

The execution of Wyatt on 11 April, and his statement that neither Elizabeth or Courtenay were involved in his conspiracy (1563, p. 1001; 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

Elizabeth was suspected of being involved in Wyatt's rebellion. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

 
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Sir William Blunt

(1514? - 1546?) [Appears as Blount, courtier in Bindoff, Commons]

Sir William Blunt met with Sir Henry Knyvet and Stephen Gardiner at a council at Ratisbone. 1583, p. 1786.

He was told of Knyvet's meeting with Ludovico by Knyvet. 1583, pp. 1786-87.

 
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Sir William Paget

(by 1506 - 1563 )

Lord Paget of Beaudesert (1549). Lord Privy Seal (1556 - 1558). MP (unknown constituency - 1529), Middlesex (1545), Staffordshire (1547). Secretary to Jane Seymour and Anne of Cleves (1537 and 1540). High Steward of Cambridge University (1547 - 1553). [Bindoff; DNB]

William Paget accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He signed a royal dispensation of 5 August 1550 which permitted Hooper to be consecrated without having to wear vestments (1563, p. 1050; 1570, p. 1676; 1576, p. 1403 [recte 1430]; 1583, p. 1504).

On 7 November 1554, he was sent as an ambassador 'I know not whither, but it was thought to be to escort Pole to England', (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, pp. 1473-74).

He was one of John Roger's examiners on 22 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1023-26; 1570, pp. 1657-59;1576, pp. 1414-15; 1583, pp. 1484-86).

Lord Paget delivered Stephen Gardiner to Bonner. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Cheke had safe passage from King Philip, with Lord Paget and Sir John Mas securing their safety. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Having seen Paget safely off to England, Carew and Cheke were taken en route between Brussels and Antwerp. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

John Mason warned Richard Bertie and his wife Katherine that Lord Paget was on his way under a false pretence and that the duke of Brunswick was nearby in the service of the house of Austria against the French king. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

 
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Thomas Chalenor

Secretary to Sir Henry Knyvet.

Sir Henry Knyvet chose Thomas Chalenor, who spoke Italian, to report to him on Ludovico's talk about Stephen Gardiner's receipt of letters from the pope. 1583, p. 1786.

 
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Thomas Cranmer

(1489 - 1556)

Archbishop of Canterbury (1533 - 1553) [Fasti; DNB; MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer, 1996]. Martyr

Foxe records the life, condemnation and death of Cranmer. 1563, pp. 1470-1503, 1570, pp. 2032-71, 1576, pp. 1752-82, 1583, pp. 1859-90.

Foxe records Cranmer's formative years and early career. His mother was Agnes Hatfield. Cranmer read the works of Faber, Erasmus and Luther. 1563, pp. 1470-71, 1570, pp. 2032-33, 1576, pp. 1752-53, 1583, pp. 1859-60.

Cranmer was asked by Dr Capon to be a founding fellow of Wolsey's college. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

Alexander Seton and Edward Foxe lodged with Cressey while Thomas Cranmer was there and dined with him. The following day Henry VIII called Seton and Foxe to him to discuss his marriage. They then sent for Cranmer. 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1860.

Cranmer was sent as Henry VIII's ambassador to the emperor. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

He was made archbishop of Canterbury. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

Cranmer was asked by Henry VIII to search the scriptures for a case for his divorce from Catherine of Arragon. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1860.

Henry VIII asked the earl of Wiltshire to allow Cranmer to stay at his house in Durham. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861.

Cranmer went to Mr Cressey's house at Waltham Abbey during the summer plague season. Cranmer's wife was a relative of Cressey. 1570, p. 2033 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1860.

Henry VIII called Seton and Foxe to him to discuss his marriage. They then sent for Cranmer. 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1860.

The pope's authority was discussed at the universities of Cambridge and Oxford, where it was concluded that Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Arragon was not legal, and the pope's authority was denounced. Cranmer, the earl of Wiltshire, Stokesley, Carne and Benet were then sent before the pope to deliver these conclusions. 1563, p. 1472, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861. [1563 has the commission as consisting of: Bonner, Winchester, Sampson, Repps, Goodricke, Latimer, Shaxton, and Barlow.]

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Cranmer met with Cornelius Agrippa. 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1861.

Cromwell was sent with Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Cranmer at Lambeth. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1862.

Chersey, a grocer in the city of London, had a kinsman who was a priest and who spent more time in the alehouse than his church. This priest spoke against Cranmer in the alehouse one day. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1863.

The priest was sent to the Fleet. Cromwell forgot about him and eventually sent him to Cranmer. Cranmer in time spoke to the priest and set him free. 1570, pp. 2036-38, 1576, pp. 1756-57, 1583, pp. 1863-64.

Cranmer investigated the case of a woman accused of committing adultery. 1563, pp. 1477-78, 1576, pp. 1570-71.

Cranmer sent a token via W. P. [William Porrege] to a woman falsely accused of adultery, asking for forgiveness for the treatment she received while in custody. 1563, p. 1478, 1576, p. 1751.

Lord Wryosley wept at the bedside of King Henry VIII and saved the life of Mary, Henry and Catherine's daughter. 1563, p. 1478.

Thomas Seymour spoke against Cranmer to the king, which he later regretted. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1758, 1583, p. 1865.

Richard Neville, noting that Sir Thomas Seymour was hoping to see Cranmer, brought him to the archbishop at dinner. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1758, 1583, p. 1865.

After Cromwell was apprehended, bishops Heath and Skip forsook Cranmer and stood against him. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, pp. 1865-66.

Winchester and others tried to take Cranmer out of the king's favour. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

The king sent Sir Anthony Denny to commit Cranmer to the Tower. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

Cranmer spoke with the king. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

Buttes, the king's physician, spoke to the king about the fact that Cranmer was being forced to wait like a lackey to come into council. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1866.

The king and the council made their peace with Cranmer. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Sir John Gostwicke accused Cranmer of heresy before parliament, citing his sermons at Sandwich and his lectures at Canterbury as evidence. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Prebendaries and justices of Kent accused Cranmer of heresy. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Articles were put to Henry VIII against Cranmer. Henry VIII told Cranmer what these articles were. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

A commission was sent to Kent to find out the truth about Cranmer's beliefs and the charges of heresy against him. The commission members were Dr Belhouse, Chauncellor Cox and Hussey the registrar. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1867.

Cranmer's secretary wrote to Buttes and Denny asking for Dr Lee to join the commission, lest nothing be learned by the commission. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

A conspiracy against Cranmer was discovered through some letters that were found, including one by the suffragen of Dover and one by Barbar, a civilian maintained in Cranmer's household as a counsellor in matters of law. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

Cranmer spoke with Dover and Barber. Barber said that hanging was too good for villains. They asked for Cranmer's forgiveness. 1570, pp. 2042-43, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1868.

Cranmer was confirmed in his reformist beliefs after a conference with Ridley. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer's wife is mentioned as a niece to the wife of Osiander. Cranmer was married while acting as the king's ambassador to Charles the emperor. 1563, p. 1478, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer was opposed to the writings of Gardiner. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Rowland Taylor left Cranmer's household to become rector of Hadleigh (1563, p. 1065; 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1495; 1583, p. 1519). [Actually Taylor was Cranmer's chaplain.]

Cranmer commanded Rowland Taylor to make Robert Drakes a deacon. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

In the third year of Edward's reign Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley admitted Robert Drakes to minister the sacraments. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Foxe states that at his death Edward VI bequeathed the throne to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer refused to swear allegience to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, pp. 2045-46, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

The dukes of Northumberland and Suffolk were executed for their support of Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Lady Jane and her husband were beheaded. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe states that those who were blinded with ignorance or malice thought Peter Martyr not a learned man. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472].

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Scory, bishop of Rochester, visited Cranmer. He took a copy of Cranmer's writings about the rumour that he had said the mass (when Thornden had in fact said it) and had it published. Cranmer was commanded to appear before the council and bring an inventory of his goods. 1563, p. 1479, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

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Heath questioned Cranmer about his bill against the mass. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martyn and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

Cranmer was accused of conspiring with John Dudley, duke of Northumberland. 1563, p. 1483, 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Thomas Cranmer met with Peter Martyr, about 5 September 1553, in London, to discuss a projected disputation where they would defend the Book of Common Prayer. Cranmer was then arrested (1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339; and 1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

On 13 September Cranmer was ordered to appear before the privy council. On 14 September he was charged by the privy council with treason and spreading seditious libels and was committed to the Tower (1583, p. 1410).

He was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

He was cited to appear before the queen's commissioners on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1465).

Rumoured to have celebrated a mass at Canterbury, Cranmer issued a denial or 'purgation' of the rumours on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1465).

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1553 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

He was committed to the Tower on 14 September 1553 (1570, p. 1466; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1466).

A rumor spread that Cranmer had recanted his protestant conviction and allowed a mass to be celebrated at Canterbury; he issued a printed denial of this. In the denial, he offered to defend his religious beliefs in open debate together with Peter Martyr. Cranmer was imprisoned and arraigned for treason but ultimately pardoned. He was still charged with heresy (1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; and 1583, p. 1418).

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He was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, pp. 932 and 937; 1570, pp. 1592-93; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; and 1583, p. 1429).

[NB: There is a summary of Cranmer's disputation on Monday 16 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, p. 933.]

Cranmer disputed with the catholic doctors on 16 April 1554 (1563, pp. 938-56; 1570, pp. 1593-1606; 1576, pp. 1360-70; and 1583, pp. 1430-41).

He disputed with John Harpsfield on the nature of the eucharist as part of Harpsfield's obtaining his D.D. on 19 April 1554 (1563, pp 987-90; 1570, pp. 1629-31; 1576, pp. 1390-91; and 1583, pp. 1460-62).

Cranmer wrote to the privy council on 23 April 1554, protesting at the way in which the Oxford disputations were conducted. Weston opened the letter and refused to deliver it (1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, p. 1464).

The queen's letter ordering Cranmer to be held in the custody of the mayor and bailiffs of Oxford during the disputation is printed in 1563, p. 999.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

He was summoned, together with Ridley and Latimer, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant his opinions and denied Weston's claim that he had been defeated in the disputation, claiming that the questions and challenges flew at him without order or giving him time to answer. He was condemned and taken to Bocardo (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; and 1583, pp. 1463-64).

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Bullinger sent commendations to Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554. 1570, pp. 1692-93; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer. 1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Ridley was converted through reading Bertram's Book of the Sacrament, and confirmed in his beliefs through conference with Cranmer and Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1895 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, p. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he made reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Ridley hoped to see Cranmer before his death, but Cranmer was with Friar Soto. 1570, p. 1936, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Cranmer was condemned by Weston and others of the university. He was committed to the mayor and sheriffs of Oxford. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

On 21 April 1554, Cranmer was compelled to observe, from Bocardo, a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried the canopy over Weston (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; and 1583, pp. 1463-64).

A ten-foot high scaffold was set up in St Mary's church at the east end for Brookes to represent the pope, from which Cranmer was condemned. 1563, p. , 1570, p. 2047 , 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

Cranmer's profession of his faith was spoken in St Mary's church before those who condemned him. 1570, pp. 2050-52, 1576, pp. 1768-69, 1583, pp. 1874-75.

Foxe records Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Foxe records Brookes' oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2054-56, 1576, pp. 1772-73, 1583, pp. 1878-79.

There was a talk between Martyn and Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2052-53, 1576, pp. 1770-72, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Foxe records interrogatories and answers. 1570, p. 2054, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, pp. 1877-78.

The witnesses against Cranmer were Dr Marshall, commissary and dean of Christ's Church; Dr Smith, under commissary; Dr Tresham; Dr Crooke, London; Mr Curtop; Mr Warde; Mr Serles. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, p. 1879.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Foxe records Cranmer's full answer to Brookes' oration against him. 1570, pp. 2057-58., 1576, pp. 1774-75, 1583, pp. 1880-81.

Cranmer stated that he was ambassador in Germany when Warham died. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1774, 1583, p. 1880.

Cranmer met with Dr Oliver and other civil lawyers to discuss the pope's authority. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

A commission was sent from the pope regarding the sentencing of Cranmer. 1563, pp. 1490-91.

Thirlby and Bonner came to Cranmer with a new commission on 14 February 1556. 1570, pp. 2058-59, 1576, pp. 177576, 1583, pp. 1881-82.

Cranmer appealed. 1570, pp. 2059-61, 1576, pp. 1776-77, 1583, pp. 1882-83.

Cranmer's appeal was put to the bishop of Ely. 1570, p. 2062, 1576, p. 1777, 1583, p. 1883.

Bullinger sent commendations to Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554 (1570, pp. 1692-93; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Cranmer received a letter from Ridley, together with copies of Ridley's account of the disputation, and news about recent developments (1570, pp. 1633-34; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, pp. 1464-65; not in LM).

Foxe mentions Cranmer's condemnation and disputation in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97).

Cranmer was degraded. 1563, p. 1493.

Cranmer recanted. 1563, pp. 1497-98, 1570, p. 2062, 1576, pp. 1778-80, 1583, p. 1884.

Witnesses to Cranmer's recantation were Henry Sydall and Friar John de villa Garcina. 1570, pp. 2062-63, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1884.

Lord Williams, Thomas Bridges and Sir John Bourne arrived in Oxford, prior to Cranmer's martyrdom. 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Cole was secretly asked to prepare a funeral sermon. 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

The deaths of Northumberland and Thomas More are referred to in the description of the death of Cranmer. 1570, p. 2064, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1885.

Foxe records Cranmer's prayer. 1570, pp. 2064-65, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1886.

Cranmer was pulled from the pulpit. 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1887.

Cole preached a sermon prior to the martyrdom of Cranmer. 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, pp. 1885-86.

Thomas Cranmer was burned. 1570, p. 2066, 1576, p. 1782, 1583, pp. 1887-88.

Cranmer's letters. 1563, pp. 1483-84, 1489, 1492-93, 1570, pp. 2067-72, 1576, pp. 1782-86, 1583, pp. 1889-93.

Henry VIII directed Cranmer and Cromwell (and others, including Stokesly) to examine John Frith. 1583, pp. 2126-27.

Buswell, a priest, spoke to Edward Benet whilst they were imprisoned together and gave him a copy of Cranmer's recantation. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Foxe includes a copy of the Pope's commission to proceed against Cranmer. 1583, p. 2132.

During his examination Weston and Smith challenged Cranmer over his book of the sacrament. 1583, p. 2135.

William Holcroft was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Wolfe

William Wolfe was servant to Sir Thomas Wyatt and then to Sir Henry Knyvet. 1583, p. 1786.

He met with Ludovico [Ludovick], the Italian merchant or banker, who had been sent to aquire an answer to the pope's letters. 1583, p. 1786.

He introduced Ludovico to Sir Henry Knyvet. 1583, pp. 1786-87.

1810 [1786]

Queene Mary. The lyfe and story of Gardiner Bishop of Winchester.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. October.And thus long continued he firme and forward so that who but Winchester during all the tyme and raigne of Queene Anne. After her decease that time by litle and litle caried him away, MarginaliaThe first turning of Winchester from the Gospell, & why?til at length the emulation 

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Ambitious rivalry (OED).

of Cromwels state, and especially (as it seemeth) for his so muche fauouring of Boner (whom Winchester at that time in no case coulde abide)  
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See Glyn Redworth, In Defence of the Church Catholic: The Life of StephenGardiner (Oxford: 1990), pp. 83-84 on Gardiner's animosity towards Bonner at this point in their lives.

made him an vtter enemie both agaynst him, and also his Religion: till agayne in kyng Edwardes daies, he began a litle to rebate from certaine poyntes of Popery, and somewhat to smell of the Gospell, MarginaliaAn other halfe turne from Popery to the Gospell.as both by his Sermon before king Edward, and also by his subscribyng to certane Articles may appeare: and this was an half turne of Stephen Gardener from Popery againe to the Gospell, and (no doubt) he would haue further turned, had not the unlucky decay of the Duke of Somerset cleane turned him away from true Diuinitie to playne Popery: MarginaliaWinchester turned to a full Papist.wherein he continued a cruell persecutour to his dying day.

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And thus much concerning the trade and profession of Ste. Gardiners Popish diuinity. In which his popishe trade, whether he folowed more true iudgement, or els time, or rather the spirite of ambition & vaine glory, it is doubtful to say, & so much þe more doubtfull, MarginaliaWinchester neuer constant in himselfe nor agreing with other Papistes.because in his doings & writinges a man may see him not only contrary to him selfe, but also in some points contrary to other Papistes. MarginaliaA great parte of Winchesters diuinitye is to be found in Pereseus.And furthermore, where he agreeth with them, he seemeth therein not so much to folow his owne sense, as þe mind & meaning of Pereseus: 

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I.e., the Spanish theologian Martin Perez de Ayala.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, 587, fn 1

This was Martin Perez de Ayala, a Spanish theologian. He accompanied his patron, Don Francis a Mendoza, after having been his confessor and coadjutor in the bishopric of Jaen, into Italy, and afterwards staid for some years in Louvain, Worms, and Antwerp, where he commenced the work, to which Gardiner may have been indebted, "De divinis, apostolicis, atque eccels. Traditionibus libri decem;" Coloniæ 1549. He died in 1566, archbishop of Valencia. Antonio Biblioth. Hisp. nova; tom. ii. p. 107. Matriti, 1788. - ED.

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out of whose booke the greatest part of Winchesters Diuinity seemeth to be borowed.

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And therefore, as in the true knowledge of Gods holy word & scripture he appeareth no body: 

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Note that a passage which appeared here in the 1563 edition, conceding that Gardiner was 'in tong and utterance somewhat perchaunce praiseworthy' was dropped in later editions. Because it is so grudging, this is an impressive testimony to Gardiner's eloquence.

so in his pen and stile of writings no less farre he is from commendation, then he is frō al plainenes and perspicuitie. MarginaliaWinchesters stile vnpleasaunt.In whose obscure & perplexe kind of writing, although peraduenture some sense may be found with some searching, yet shall no reader finde any sweetenes in his reading.

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What moued him to be so sturdy against M. Cheke, and sir T. Smith for þe Greke pronunciatiō, other may thinke what they please: I speake but what I thinke, that he so did, for that he sawe it a thing rather newly begun, then truly impugned. 

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Sir Thomas Smith, lecturer in Greek, and John Cheke had, since themid-1530s, been teaching Greek with an 'ancient' pronunciation (i.e., the pronunciation putatively used in ancient Greece rather than the modern Greek pronunciation). This 'ancient' pronunciation was championed by many humanists, notably Erasmus, but Gardiner favoured the modern pronunciation which had been traditionally taught in universities. In his capacity as chancellor of Cambridge, Gardiner banned the 'ancient' pronunciation from being taught at the University. Cheke and Smith wrote Latin treatises attacking Gardiner's position and Gardiner defended his position in lengthy Latin letters. (See J. A. Muller, Stephen Gardiner and the Tudor Reaction [London: 1926], pp. 121-23.

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Such was the disposition of that mā (as it semeth) þt of purpose be euer affected to seme to be a patron of al old customes, though they were neuer so rotten with age. Amongest other matters, this one thing I can not but meruaile at in my minde, when I see how proudly he braggeth and vaynely vaunteth him selfe (aswell in his letters to the L. Protector, & others of K. Edwardes counsell, as also in his long matter articulated and exhibited by hym vnto the Archbishop of Canterburie, and other the kyngs Commissioners, of the high fauour he had of the noble K. of famous memory K. Henry the 8. when in deede nothing was lesse true: neither did the king lesse fauour any of his Counsell, then him, affirming very often that he greatly suspected the sayde B. to be a secrete maynteiner of the B. of Romes vsurped authoritie, and a stout disturber and hinderer of his proceedinges in reformation of Religion. And therefore dyd so muche dislyke with him, that he did not onely mynd (if the Lord had lent his highnes longer life) to haue vsed the extremity of law agaynst him, vpon very sore & iust matter of old committed by him (and yet not taken away by any pardon) commaunding thereupon often the L. Paget then his Secretarie, to kepe safe certaine writinges which he had against him: But also commaunded that he should be put cleane out of his last will & Testament, not sufferyng him either to be any of his Executors, or els in any case of his sonnes counsayle, no although he were earnestly entreated to the contrary by sundry of the Lordes & others of his highnes Counsayle, saying, he was a wylfull, troublesome, and hedstrong man, and not meete to be about his sonne, or to haue any thing to do by his wil. 
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The reliability of Paget's testimony on this point has been questioned by J. A. Muller, Stephen Gardiner and the Tudor Reaction (London: 1926) pp. 198-200and Glyn Redworth, In Defence of the Church Catholic: The Life of Stephen Gardiner (Oxford: 1990), pp. 245-47.

Now amōgst other causes that moued the K. thus to suspect his fidelity towards his godly proceedinges in religion, I find this to be one.  
Commentary  *  Close

The episode which Foxe describes at length is taken from testimony at Gardiner's trial in 1550 (see 1563, pp. 816-18) and analyzed in Glyn Redworth, In Defence of the Church Catholic: The Life of Stephen Gardiner (Oxford: 1990), pp. 152-55.

It pleased his Maiestie after his abolishing of the B. of Romes vsurped authoritie (amongest other Embassages to forraine Princes) to send the sayd B. of Winchester, and Sir Henry Knyuet Knight, as ioynt Embassadours to the Emperour, being then at a dyet or counsayle at Ratisbone,  
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I.e., Regensburg.

appoynting also S. Iohn Barkeley,  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, 588, fn 1

Spelt Bartley in the depositions. - ED.

S. W. Blunt Knightes, and M. Andrew Baynton Esquier, (his highnes seruauntes) to geue their attendaunce vpon the sayde S. Henry Knyuet for þe more honoring of his ambassage. It happened also at that time, that S. Henry Knyuet enterteyned into his seruice (as Steward of his household) one Wil. Wolfe, who had in the same place & rome, before serued S. Thomas Wyat Knight the K. former Ambassadour there, and by that meanes had good acquaintaunce in those partes, aswell in the Emeperours Court, as els

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where. This Wolfe, towardes the latter end of that dyet or counsell, happened to walke (as often he did) towardes themperours Pallace to heare some newes, where he met with one Ludouico, an Italian Merchaunt or banker, one of his old acquaintaunce: who, supposing the sayd Wolfe to haue attended vpon the B. of Winchester (not knowing of any other ioynt Ambassadour) required Wolfe for olde acquaintaunce, to do him a pleasure: whereunto he wyllingly graunted. Whereupon Ludouico shewed him, that the Popes legate, or Ambassadour to themperour (which was Cardinal Contarene)  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, 588, fn 3

Cardinal Gaspar Contarini, bishop of Beiluno, was much employed in negotiations amongst the Protestants previous to the Council of Trent; in the conducting of which he did not proceed with so much dogmatism as was thought proper at Rome, and accordingly fell under suspicion of heresy. Sleidan, lib. xiv (anno 1542,) pp. 280, 281, vol. ii. edit. Franc. 1786. His name appears first amongst the signatures to the celebrated "Consilium de Emendanda Ecclesia," addressed by certain cardinals and other prelates to Paul III., upon his own suggestion, in 1538; and from this and other portions of his history it is evident that he was not voluntarily altogether a Romish bishop. He died legate of Bologna in 1542. See Dupin, cent. 16, book iii, pp. 429 and 462; Schelhorn's "Epistola ad Card. Quirini de Consilio de Emend. Ecclesia," (Tiguri, 1748), and Rivet. Cath. Orthod., tract iv. Quæst. 2. ¶ 12. - ED.

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departing (the day) before towardes Rome, and hauing no leasure to end his busines him selfe, had put the sayd Ludouico in trust for the accomplishyng of them: and amonges all other thinges he had especially charged hym that he should repayre to the Ambassadour of England, and require of him an aunswere of the Popes letters, which the Legat did of late sende vnto him, addressed to him from Rome, & that vpon the recept thereof he should send thē after with all speede: and therfore, if his L. Ambassadour woulde write by that currour, he prayed Wolfe to tell him that it was tyme to write, for the currour went away within a day or two. At this tale Wolfe being abashed, & yet partly gessing which Ambassadour he ment, thought it not mete to tell him whose seruaunt he was, but by other soothing talke, perceiued that he ment the B. of Winchester: and to thend that Ludouico shoulde suspect nothing, he aunswered him, that he beyng not the Ambassadours Secretary, coulde say litle therein, how beit he woulde not misse to put his Secretarie in remembraunce of it: which thing Ludouicke also desired him to do, for that he had no other acquaintaūce with thembassadours, and so for that time they departed. This matter seming to Wolfe of some importaunce, dyd straight waies reueale it to sir H. Knyuet his M. Who, weighing also the greatnes of the case, and the disaduauntage it were, vpon one mans so bare a report to attempt ought, in a place and time, whereby suche a person was to be touched, charged Wolfe, wel to aduise him self, that no affect of hate, displeasure, or other passion, did moue him to disclose this, but truth only. Wolfe replied, that he weighed wel the weightines of the case, meete, as to his owne respect, to be passed ouer in silence, for auoyding of his priuate displeasure, if duty of allegeaunce bound him not otherwyse. But Sir, (quoth he) if ye thinke not my hearing hereof one to one to be sufficient, I warrent you to deuise meanes, that some others of your seruauntes shall heare the like wordes at Ludouickes owne mouth as wel as I. Vpon which talke, sir H. Knyuet deuised, which of his seruauntes he might vse to that purpose, and at last rested vppon M. Thomas Chalenor his Secretary, becaue he had the Italian tonge. Not yet makyng him pryuie of any matter, but wylled Wolfe to take him abroad with him as of his owne priuat motion, for they were very familiar friendes. Whereupon the next morning being sonday, Wolfe came to Chalenors chamber, and prayed him familiarly to go walke with him abroad to þe Piazza or marketstead: which he gladly graunting so did, not knowing of any speciall cause why. When they came to the Piazza, ouer against themperours pallace, (nere wherunto also the Popes legate had lodged) & had there walked a while together, there came thyther the said Ludouicke, and espying Wolfe, saluted him very friendly, & entred into talke about thexchaunge, & sundry other matters, Chalenor being still with them. At last vpō occasion, they entred into like talk about the former letters that the Ambassadours of Englande had receiued from Rome by the Popes legate, of which Ludouico had in charge to receiue an aunswere, affirming, that the Post did depart the next day, & therfore prayed Wolfe to put thembassadours secretarie in remembrance of them. Wherunto Wolfe aunswered, that he would willingly do it: but he did not well know which Ambassadour he meant, for that there were two: one, the B. of Winchester, & the other, a Gentleman of the K. priuy chamber. To whom Ludouicke replyed, that he ment not the Gentleman of the priuy chamber, but the Bishop. By which talke and more such like (as vpon the former day,) M. Chalenor being moued (and not knowing yet of his Maisters and Wolfes purpose) after the departure of Ludouico from them, sayd vnto Wolfe that Ludouico had had but homely talke with him to be passed ouer lightly, & therfore he would tel his M. of it. To whom Wolfe aunswered, do as you wyll, if you thinke any matter therein. And therefore at his returne home he told sir H. Knyuet what spech he had hard at Ludouickes mouth. Sir H. Knyuet, being thus farther accertayned of the matter, opened the whole to sir I. Barkeley, sir W. Blunt, and to M. Baynton: who all agreed, yet to make a farther triall thereof. And therfore deuised that Wolfe should procure Ludouicke to bring certaine Veluet and other Silkes

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