Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
George Catmer

(d. 1556)

Martyr. Of Hythe.

George Catmer was the husband of Joan Catmer. 1570, p. 2032.

He was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Foxe records the articles against him and his answers in 1563, p. 1273. These are referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614 and 1583, p. 1708.

He was burned on 6 August 1556 according to 1563 (p. 1273), or about 6 September [1556] according to later editions: 1570, p. 1184, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708, at Canterbury.

 
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John Baker

Notary

John Baker the notary took part in the examination of John Lomas, Agnes Snotten, Anne Albright, Joan Sole, and Joan Catmer. 1563, p. 1470, 1570, p. 2032, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1859.

 
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John Faucet

(d. 1580)

Born in Sedbergh, Yorkshire. [Venn]

John Bland was once tutor to Dr Faucet. 1563, p. 1227, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Faucet stated that he was brought up in the same house and born in the same parish as Bland, and then warned him not to take a stand against the church. Bland dismissed him. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582 1583, 1583, p. 1670.

He took part in Thornden's examination of Bland. 1563, p. 1225, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Bland was given the chance to talk to Faucet in private if he wished. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1583, 1583, p. 1671.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Wright was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, bishop of Dover, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Faucet was judge at the examination of John Lomas, Agnes Snotten, Anne Albright, Joan Sole, and Joan Catmer. 1563, p. 1470, 1570, p. 2032, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1859.

[Note that for the examinations of Hopper, Lawrence, Sterne, Wright, and Cokar, he is listed as 'Rich. Faucet'.]

 
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John Milles

Capper. Of London.

John Milles was arrested with 26 others as a member of an illegal conventicle. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

He was imprisoned in Newgate with John Hinshaw. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2037.

He was put in the stocks for one night. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

He was sent with Thomas Hinshaw to Fulham, where he remained in the stocks for eight or ten days. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

Milles was severely beaten by Bonner in Bonner's orchard for refusing to recant and make the sign of the cross on his forehead. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

He was sent to Fulham church to hear the articles against him. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

When he was returned to prison, Milles was visited by an old conjuring priest, sent at Bonner's command, who then tried to make Milles recant. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2044.

Foxe relates one of Milles' discussions with Bonner. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2045.

Milles' wife visited Bonner as she was almost ready to give birth, demanding the release of her husband. She refused to leave Bonner's house without him. Bonner relented and allowed him his liberty for one evening. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2045.

Robert Rouse, a kinsman of Milles, witnessed Bonner's request that Milles be returned to Bonner's house after he and his wife had spent the night in lodgings in Fulham. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Bonner insisted that Milles return, which he did - of his own accord - the following day. Bonner wrote something in Latin for him to subscribe to [which was unseen by Foxe] and as it seemed no great matter, Milles consented and subscribed. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Milles died in Newgate prison in Whitsuntide week. 1570, p. 2243, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

[Brother of Robert Milles, the martyr, who was burned at Brentford. 1563, p. 1690]

 
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John Semarke

Sheriff of Canterbury (1555).

Agnes Snottle was committed to the sheriff of Canterbury. 1563, p. 1469, 1570, p. 2031, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1858.

[Probably the same John Semarke who was sheriff of Kent 1569 - 1570 (E. Hasted, A History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, 1972, XII, p. 606.)]

 
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John Warren

(d. 1558)

Prebend of Canterbury (1554 - 1558). [Fasti]

John Warren rebuked those who followed Latimer, Hooper and others. 1563, p. 1279, 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1617, 1583, p. 1711.

John Warren was judge at the examination of John Lomas, Agnes Snotten, Anne Albright, Joan Sole, and Joan Catmer. 1563, p. 1470, 1570, p. 2032, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1859.

 
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Robert Collins

Commissary of Canterbury diocese. [BCL 1522 Foster

Foxe states that Collins was the cardinal's factor before coming to England 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Robert Collins demanded that Bland return the following day but Bland did not appear, due to urgent business. Bland wrote a letter regarding this. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Robert Collins, in Thornden's house. Foxe reports the talk between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

Around 28 June Bland returned to Collins, where he proceeded against Bland before Master Cockes of Sturray and Markes the apparitor. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland remained in the castle of Canterbury until 2 March, when he was taken to the chapter house of Christ Church (Canterbury), to the suffragen of Canterbury, Master Collins, Master Mylles and others, then to Master Oxenden, Master Petit, Master Webbe and Master Hardes (these were all justices). 1563, p. 1224, 1570, p. 1848, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1669.

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Bland and Collins argued over abiding by the laws of the realm and of the sacrament. 1563, pp. 1224-25, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, pp. 1582-83, 1583, pp. 1669-70.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden, 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

John Newman was examined before Thornden, Collins and others. 1583, pp. 1686-87.

Richard Wright was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, bishop of Dover, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Collins took part in the examination of John Lomas, Agnes Snotten, Anne Albright, Joan Sole, and Joan Catmer. 1563, p. 1470, 1570, p. 2032, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1859.

John Newman was examined by Thornden and others, among whom was Robert Collins. 1570, pp. 2134-35, 1576, pp. 1856-57, 1583, pp. 1950-51.

Talk took place between Sir John Baker, Collins and Edmund Allin. 1570, pp. 2165-66, 1576, pp. 1870-71, 1583, pp. 1979-80.

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

 
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Sir John Norton

(1497 - 1561) [Bindoff, Commons]

Sir John Norton wept at the death of Joan Catmer, Joan Sole, Anne Albright and John Lomas. 1570, p. 2031, 1576, p. 1752, 1583, p. 1859.

 
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Thomas Cranmer

(1489 - 1556)

Archbishop of Canterbury (1533 - 1553) [Fasti; DNB; MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer, 1996]. Martyr

Foxe records the life, condemnation and death of Cranmer. 1563, pp. 1470-1503, 1570, pp. 2032-71, 1576, pp. 1752-82, 1583, pp. 1859-90.

Foxe records Cranmer's formative years and early career. His mother was Agnes Hatfield. Cranmer read the works of Faber, Erasmus and Luther. 1563, pp. 1470-71, 1570, pp. 2032-33, 1576, pp. 1752-53, 1583, pp. 1859-60.

Cranmer was asked by Dr Capon to be a founding fellow of Wolsey's college. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

Alexander Seton and Edward Foxe lodged with Cressey while Thomas Cranmer was there and dined with him. The following day Henry VIII called Seton and Foxe to him to discuss his marriage. They then sent for Cranmer. 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1860.

Cranmer was sent as Henry VIII's ambassador to the emperor. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

He was made archbishop of Canterbury. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

Cranmer was asked by Henry VIII to search the scriptures for a case for his divorce from Catherine of Arragon. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1860.

Henry VIII asked the earl of Wiltshire to allow Cranmer to stay at his house in Durham. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861.

Cranmer went to Mr Cressey's house at Waltham Abbey during the summer plague season. Cranmer's wife was a relative of Cressey. 1570, p. 2033 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1860.

Henry VIII called Seton and Foxe to him to discuss his marriage. They then sent for Cranmer. 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1860.

The pope's authority was discussed at the universities of Cambridge and Oxford, where it was concluded that Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Arragon was not legal, and the pope's authority was denounced. Cranmer, the earl of Wiltshire, Stokesley, Carne and Benet were then sent before the pope to deliver these conclusions. 1563, p. 1472, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861. [1563 has the commission as consisting of: Bonner, Winchester, Sampson, Repps, Goodricke, Latimer, Shaxton, and Barlow.]

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Cranmer met with Cornelius Agrippa. 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1754, 1583, p. 1861.

Cromwell was sent with Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Cranmer at Lambeth. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1862.

Chersey, a grocer in the city of London, had a kinsman who was a priest and who spent more time in the alehouse than his church. This priest spoke against Cranmer in the alehouse one day. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1863.

The priest was sent to the Fleet. Cromwell forgot about him and eventually sent him to Cranmer. Cranmer in time spoke to the priest and set him free. 1570, pp. 2036-38, 1576, pp. 1756-57, 1583, pp. 1863-64.

Cranmer investigated the case of a woman accused of committing adultery. 1563, pp. 1477-78, 1576, pp. 1570-71.

Cranmer sent a token via W. P. [William Porrege] to a woman falsely accused of adultery, asking for forgiveness for the treatment she received while in custody. 1563, p. 1478, 1576, p. 1751.

Lord Wryosley wept at the bedside of King Henry VIII and saved the life of Mary, Henry and Catherine's daughter. 1563, p. 1478.

Thomas Seymour spoke against Cranmer to the king, which he later regretted. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1758, 1583, p. 1865.

Richard Neville, noting that Sir Thomas Seymour was hoping to see Cranmer, brought him to the archbishop at dinner. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1758, 1583, p. 1865.

After Cromwell was apprehended, bishops Heath and Skip forsook Cranmer and stood against him. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, pp. 1865-66.

Winchester and others tried to take Cranmer out of the king's favour. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

The king sent Sir Anthony Denny to commit Cranmer to the Tower. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

Cranmer spoke with the king. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, p. 1866.

Buttes, the king's physician, spoke to the king about the fact that Cranmer was being forced to wait like a lackey to come into council. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1866.

The king and the council made their peace with Cranmer. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Sir John Gostwicke accused Cranmer of heresy before parliament, citing his sermons at Sandwich and his lectures at Canterbury as evidence. 1570, p. 2041, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Prebendaries and justices of Kent accused Cranmer of heresy. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

Articles were put to Henry VIII against Cranmer. Henry VIII told Cranmer what these articles were. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1867.

A commission was sent to Kent to find out the truth about Cranmer's beliefs and the charges of heresy against him. The commission members were Dr Belhouse, Chauncellor Cox and Hussey the registrar. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1867.

Cranmer's secretary wrote to Buttes and Denny asking for Dr Lee to join the commission, lest nothing be learned by the commission. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

A conspiracy against Cranmer was discovered through some letters that were found, including one by the suffragen of Dover and one by Barbar, a civilian maintained in Cranmer's household as a counsellor in matters of law. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

Cranmer spoke with Dover and Barber. Barber said that hanging was too good for villains. They asked for Cranmer's forgiveness. 1570, pp. 2042-43, 1576, p. 1760, 1583, p. 1868.

Cranmer was confirmed in his reformist beliefs after a conference with Ridley. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer's wife is mentioned as a niece to the wife of Osiander. Cranmer was married while acting as the king's ambassador to Charles the emperor. 1563, p. 1478, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer was opposed to the writings of Gardiner. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Rowland Taylor left Cranmer's household to become rector of Hadleigh (1563, p. 1065; 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1495; 1583, p. 1519). [Actually Taylor was Cranmer's chaplain.]

Cranmer commanded Rowland Taylor to make Robert Drakes a deacon. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

In the third year of Edward's reign Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley admitted Robert Drakes to minister the sacraments. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Foxe states that at his death Edward VI bequeathed the throne to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer refused to swear allegience to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, pp. 2045-46, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

The dukes of Northumberland and Suffolk were executed for their support of Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Lady Jane and her husband were beheaded. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe states that those who were blinded with ignorance or malice thought Peter Martyr not a learned man. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472].

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Scory, bishop of Rochester, visited Cranmer. He took a copy of Cranmer's writings about the rumour that he had said the mass (when Thornden had in fact said it) and had it published. Cranmer was commanded to appear before the council and bring an inventory of his goods. 1563, p. 1479, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

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Heath questioned Cranmer about his bill against the mass. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martyn and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

Cranmer was accused of conspiring with John Dudley, duke of Northumberland. 1563, p. 1483, 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Thomas Cranmer met with Peter Martyr, about 5 September 1553, in London, to discuss a projected disputation where they would defend the Book of Common Prayer. Cranmer was then arrested (1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339; and 1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

On 13 September Cranmer was ordered to appear before the privy council. On 14 September he was charged by the privy council with treason and spreading seditious libels and was committed to the Tower (1583, p. 1410).

He was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

He was cited to appear before the queen's commissioners on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1465).

Rumoured to have celebrated a mass at Canterbury, Cranmer issued a denial or 'purgation' of the rumours on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1465).

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1553 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

He was committed to the Tower on 14 September 1553 (1570, p. 1466; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1466).

A rumor spread that Cranmer had recanted his protestant conviction and allowed a mass to be celebrated at Canterbury; he issued a printed denial of this. In the denial, he offered to defend his religious beliefs in open debate together with Peter Martyr. Cranmer was imprisoned and arraigned for treason but ultimately pardoned. He was still charged with heresy (1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; and 1583, p. 1418).

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He was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, pp. 932 and 937; 1570, pp. 1592-93; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; and 1583, p. 1429).

[NB: There is a summary of Cranmer's disputation on Monday 16 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, p. 933.]

Cranmer disputed with the catholic doctors on 16 April 1554 (1563, pp. 938-56; 1570, pp. 1593-1606; 1576, pp. 1360-70; and 1583, pp. 1430-41).

He disputed with John Harpsfield on the nature of the eucharist as part of Harpsfield's obtaining his D.D. on 19 April 1554 (1563, pp 987-90; 1570, pp. 1629-31; 1576, pp. 1390-91; and 1583, pp. 1460-62).

Cranmer wrote to the privy council on 23 April 1554, protesting at the way in which the Oxford disputations were conducted. Weston opened the letter and refused to deliver it (1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, p. 1464).

The queen's letter ordering Cranmer to be held in the custody of the mayor and bailiffs of Oxford during the disputation is printed in 1563, p. 999.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

He was summoned, together with Ridley and Latimer, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant his opinions and denied Weston's claim that he had been defeated in the disputation, claiming that the questions and challenges flew at him without order or giving him time to answer. He was condemned and taken to Bocardo (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; and 1583, pp. 1463-64).

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Bullinger sent commendations to Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554. 1570, pp. 1692-93; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer. 1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Ridley was converted through reading Bertram's Book of the Sacrament, and confirmed in his beliefs through conference with Cranmer and Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1895 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, p. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he made reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Ridley hoped to see Cranmer before his death, but Cranmer was with Friar Soto. 1570, p. 1936, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Cranmer was condemned by Weston and others of the university. He was committed to the mayor and sheriffs of Oxford. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

On 21 April 1554, Cranmer was compelled to observe, from Bocardo, a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried the canopy over Weston (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; and 1583, pp. 1463-64).

A ten-foot high scaffold was set up in St Mary's church at the east end for Brookes to represent the pope, from which Cranmer was condemned. 1563, p. , 1570, p. 2047 , 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

Cranmer's profession of his faith was spoken in St Mary's church before those who condemned him. 1570, pp. 2050-52, 1576, pp. 1768-69, 1583, pp. 1874-75.

Foxe records Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Foxe records Brookes' oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2054-56, 1576, pp. 1772-73, 1583, pp. 1878-79.

There was a talk between Martyn and Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2052-53, 1576, pp. 1770-72, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Foxe records interrogatories and answers. 1570, p. 2054, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, pp. 1877-78.

The witnesses against Cranmer were Dr Marshall, commissary and dean of Christ's Church; Dr Smith, under commissary; Dr Tresham; Dr Crooke, London; Mr Curtop; Mr Warde; Mr Serles. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1772, 1583, p. 1879.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Foxe records Cranmer's full answer to Brookes' oration against him. 1570, pp. 2057-58., 1576, pp. 1774-75, 1583, pp. 1880-81.

Cranmer stated that he was ambassador in Germany when Warham died. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1774, 1583, p. 1880.

Cranmer met with Dr Oliver and other civil lawyers to discuss the pope's authority. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

A commission was sent from the pope regarding the sentencing of Cranmer. 1563, pp. 1490-91.

Thirlby and Bonner came to Cranmer with a new commission on 14 February 1556. 1570, pp. 2058-59, 1576, pp. 177576, 1583, pp. 1881-82.

Cranmer appealed. 1570, pp. 2059-61, 1576, pp. 1776-77, 1583, pp. 1882-83.

Cranmer's appeal was put to the bishop of Ely. 1570, p. 2062, 1576, p. 1777, 1583, p. 1883.

Bullinger sent commendations to Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554 (1570, pp. 1692-93; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Cranmer received a letter from Ridley, together with copies of Ridley's account of the disputation, and news about recent developments (1570, pp. 1633-34; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, pp. 1464-65; not in LM).

Foxe mentions Cranmer's condemnation and disputation in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97).

Cranmer was degraded. 1563, p. 1493.

Cranmer recanted. 1563, pp. 1497-98, 1570, p. 2062, 1576, pp. 1778-80, 1583, p. 1884.

Witnesses to Cranmer's recantation were Henry Sydall and Friar John de villa Garcina. 1570, pp. 2062-63, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1884.

Lord Williams, Thomas Bridges and Sir John Bourne arrived in Oxford, prior to Cranmer's martyrdom. 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Cole was secretly asked to prepare a funeral sermon. 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

The deaths of Northumberland and Thomas More are referred to in the description of the death of Cranmer. 1570, p. 2064, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1885.

Foxe records Cranmer's prayer. 1570, pp. 2064-65, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1886.

Cranmer was pulled from the pulpit. 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1887.

Cole preached a sermon prior to the martyrdom of Cranmer. 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, pp. 1885-86.

Thomas Cranmer was burned. 1570, p. 2066, 1576, p. 1782, 1583, pp. 1887-88.

Cranmer's letters. 1563, pp. 1483-84, 1489, 1492-93, 1570, pp. 2067-72, 1576, pp. 1782-86, 1583, pp. 1889-93.

Henry VIII directed Cranmer and Cromwell (and others, including Stokesly) to examine John Frith. 1583, pp. 2126-27.

Buswell, a priest, spoke to Edward Benet whilst they were imprisoned together and gave him a copy of Cranmer's recantation. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Foxe includes a copy of the Pope's commission to proceed against Cranmer. 1583, p. 2132.

During his examination Weston and Smith challenged Cranmer over his book of the sacrament. 1583, p. 2135.

William Holcroft was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Aslacton [Aslockton]
NGR: SK 740 400

A township in the parish of Whatton, northern division of the wapentake of Bingham, county of Nottingham. 2.75 miles east by north from Bingham. In the Honour of Tutbury, Duchy of Lancaster. The living (of Whatton) is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Nottingham, Diocese of York.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Cranmer Hall, Norfolk
NGR: TF 886 327

 
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Hith, Hyth [Hythe]
NGR: TR 160 360

A borough, parish and one of the Cinque Ports, having separate jurisdiction but locally in the hundred of Hythe, lathe of Shepway, county of Kent. 33 miles south-east by east from Maidstone, 67 miles south-east by east from London. The living is a perpetual curacy annexed to the rectory of Saltwood, in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Horton [Monks Horton]
NGR: TR 127 399

A parish in the hundred of Stouting, Lathe of Shepway, county of Kent. 5 miles north-north-west from Hythe. The living is a discharged rectory, consolidated with the vicarage of Brabourne, in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1883 [1859]

Queene Mary. Fiue Martyrs burned at Canterb. for the Gospell.
MarginaliaAnno 1556. Ianuary.1 Iohn Lomas Martyr.

MarginaliaIohn Lomas, Martyr.IOhn Lomas of the parish of Tenterden, detected and presented of that religion which the papists call heresie, and cited vpon the same to appeare at Canterburie, examined there of the first article, whether he beleued the catholicke church or no, answeared thus: that he beleeued so much as is contained in Gods booke and no more.

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Then being assigned to appeare againe vnder the pain of lawe the next Wednesday seuennight after, which was the xvij. day of Ianuarie, the said Lomas examined whether he would be confessed of a priest or no, answeared and sayde, MarginaliaThe aunswere of Iohn Lomas at his examination.that he founde it not wrytten that he should be confessed to any Priest in Gods booke, neither would be confessed, vnlesse hee were accused by some man of sinne. Againe, examined whether he beleeued the body of Christe to be in the Sacrament of the Altare really vnder the formes of bread and wine after the consecration or no, MarginaliaThe Sacrament of the Altar denyed.he answeared that he beleeued no realtie of Christes body to be in the Sacrament, neither founde hee wrytten, that hee is there vnder forme or tressell, MarginaliaRealty of Christ, neyther vnder forme nor tressel.but he beleeued so muche as is wrytten. 

Commentary  *  Close

Notice how complicated and sophisticated the articles used in Canterbury were compared to those used in London.

Being then demaunded whether he beleeued that there is a catholicke churche or no, and whether hee would be content to be a member of the same, he answeared thereunto that he beleeued so much as was wrytten in Gods booke, and other aunsweare then this hee refused to geue. &c. MarginaliaSentence against Iohn Lomas.Whereuppon the sentence was geuen and red against hym the xviij. day of Ianuarie, and so committed to the seculare power, hee constantly suffered for the conscience of a true Faith, wyth the other fower women here following.

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2 Agnes Snoth, Martyr.

MarginaliaIanuary. 31.AGnes Snoth widowe, of the Parishe of Smarden, likewise accused & cited for the true profession of Christes religion, was diuers times examined before the Pharisaicall fathers. Who there compelled to answere to suche Articles and Interrogatories as should be ministred vnto her, firste MarginaliaConfession auricular refused.denied to be confessed to a Priest: notwithstanding, shee denied not to confesse her offences as one to an other, but not auricularlye to anye Priest. And as touching the Sacrament of the aultare, MarginaliaThe Sacrament how to be receaued.shee protested that if shee or any other, did receiue the Sacrament so as Christe and as his Apostles after him did deliuer it, then shee and they did receiue it to their comfort: but as it is nowe vsed in the church, shee sayd that no man coulde otherwise receiue it than to his damnation, as she thought. Afterward being examined againe concerning penaunce, whether it were a Sacrament or no, MarginaliaPenaunce is denyed to be a Sacrament.she plainly denied the same, and that the Popish manner of their absolution, was not consonant to the woorde, nor necessary to be taken: with suche other like, agreeing with the aunsweres and confession of Iohn Lomas before mentioned. MarginaliaAgnes Snoth condemned and committed to the secular power.Whereupon the sentence likewise being red, she was committed to the sheriffes of Canterbury, and so suffering Martyrdome with the rest, declared her selfe a perfect and constant witnesse of Christ and of his truth, the xxxj. day of Ianuarie.

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3 Anne Albright, aliàs Champnes, Martyr.

MarginaliaAnne Albright Martyr.AGainst Anne Albright, likewise appearing before the Iudge and his Colleagues, it was also obiected concerning the same matter of Confession. Whereunto shee answeared in these woordes, saying: MarginaliaAuricular confession.that shee woulde not be confessed of a priest, and added moreouer, speaking vnto the Priests: MarginaliaThe wordes of Anne Albright to the Priestes.You Priests (sayde shee) are the children of perdition, and can doe no good by your Confession. And likewise speaking vnto the Iudge and his assistants, shee tolde them that they were subuerters of Christes truth.

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MarginaliaAnne Albright denyeth the Sacrament of the Altar.And as touching the Sacrament of the aultar, she said it was a noughty and abhominable idoll, and so vtterlye denied the same sacrament. MarginaliaCondemnation of Anne Albright. Ianuary. 18.Thus persisting and perseuering in her former sayings & answers, shee was condemned the sayd 18. day of the sayde moneth, with the other aboue mentioned: with whom also she suffered quietly and with great comfort for the right of Christes religion.

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Ioane Sole.

MarginaliaIoane Sole Martyr. Ionuary. 31.IN like maner Ioane Sole, of þe parish of Horton, was condemned of the same Phariseis and Priestes, for not allowing confession ariculare, and for denyinge the reall presence and substaunce of Christ to be in the sacrament of the aultare. Who after their Pharisaicall sentence beynge promulgate, MarginaliaCondemnation of Ioane Sole. Ianuary. 18.was brought by the Sheriffes to the stake wt the other fower, and sustained the like Martyrdome with them, through the assistaunce of Gods holy grace and spirite mightely woorking in her, to the glorye of his name, and confirmation of his truth.

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Ioane Catmer.

MarginaliaIoane Catmer, martyr.The fift and last of this heauenly company of Martyrs, was Ioane Catmer of the parish of Hith, wife (as it should seeme) of George Catmer burned before. Who being asked what shee sayde to Confession made to a Priest, denyed to be confessed to any suche priest. And moreouer, the Iudge speaking of the sacrament of the altar, she sayd and affirmed that shee beleeued not in that sacrament, as it was then vsed, for that it was made (sayd shee) a very idoll. MarginaliaIanuary. 31.In this her confession she remaining and persisting, was by the like sentence cruelly of them condemned, and so suffered with the foresayd Thomas Lomas, and the other three fellow Martyrs, ratifying and confessing wyth their bloud the true knowledge and doctrine of the glorious Gospel of Christ Iesus our Sauiour.

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The burning of the foresayd man and foure women. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Iohn Lomas, Agnes Snoth, Anne Albright, Ioane Sole, Ioane Catmer, at Canterburye. An. 1556. Ianuary. 31.

woodcut [View a larger version]

Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
This small illustration of a multiple burning (Type 1), accurate in its representation of the five burned at two stakes in one fire (perhaps in the act of singing psalms together) stereotyped though it may seem in the repeating imagery of the small cuts, could have been tailored to this event. And it was not reused.

These 5. persones were burnt at 2. stakes and one fire together at Canterbury, as is before sayd. Who, when the fire was flaming aboute their eares, did singe Psalmes. Whereat the good Knight Syr Iohn Norton being there present, wept bitterly at the sight thereof. 

Commentary  *  Close

This detail was added in the 1570 edition and was undoubtedly sent to Foxe by an eyewitness to Catmer's death.

MarginaliaPersecutorsThe Iudges and the other assistantes which sate vppon her, and the other foure aboue mentioned, were Richard Faucet, Iohn Warren, Iohn Milles, Robert Collins, and Iohn Baker the Notarie.

The life, state, and storie of the Reuerend Pastour and Prelate, Thomas Cranmer Archbishop of Caunterburie, Martyr, burned at Oxforde, for the Confession of Christes true Doctrine, vnder Queene Marie. An. 1556. March. 21. 
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The Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer

There was a lengthy account of Cranmer's life, career and martyrdom in the Rerum (pp. 708-25). Most of this account came from a single informant whosenarrative of Cranmer's life and death survives in Foxe's papers (BL, Harley 417, fos. 90r-94v; printed in Narratives of the Days of the Reformation, ed. John Gough Nichols, Camden Society, original series, [London: 1860], pp. 218-33). This account was sent to Foxe by Grindal while Foxe was compiling the Rerum during his exile (The Remains of Edmund Grindal, ed., W. Nicholson [Parker Society: 1843], p. 220). Foxe added two items to the Rerum account which were not in this narrative: additional praise of Edward VI, undoubtedly composed by Foxe himself (Rerum, pp. 712-13), and the account of Henry Sydall and Juan de Villagarcia persuading Cranmer to recant and of events up through Henry Cole's sermon at Cranmer's execution (Rerum, pp. 717-21).

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In the 1563 edition, Foxe used the Rerum account of Cranmer as the basisfor his new account but he made some important additions to it. He provided a new narrative of Cranmer's trial, also adding Cranmer's letter to Mary denying any involvement in Northumberland's scheme to place Jane Grey on the throne, the papal commission to try Cranmer and the account of his degradation. All of this was based on documents related to Cranmer's trial. Foxe also obtained a newaccount, from an unknown source, of Cranmer's denial that he had celebrated mass at Canterbury. And Foxe also added material on Cranmer's execution written by a catholic eyewitness, known only by his initials 'J. A.'.

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In the 1570 edition Foxe rewrote the account of Cranmer in order to accommodate new data contained in a life of the archbishop written by Ralph Morrice, Cranmer's secretary. (This life is printed in Narratives of the Days of Reformation, pp. 238-72). Material was also added from official records as Foxe had now consulted the transcript of Cranmer's trial and had obtained a copy of his appeal to a general council. Material was also dropped from this edition. Some of it, such as the old versions of Cranmer's role in Henry VIII's divorce, were dropped because Morrice's account superseded them. Others, such as Cranmer's letter to Mary, the papal commission authorizing the archbishop's trial, and the account of Cranmer's degradation, were dropped because of their length and the shortage of paper in the 1570 edition.

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There was no change in the account in the 1576 edition. In the 1583 edition, Foxe re-inserted some of the material he had deleted from the 1570 edition: the papal commission authorizing Cranmer's trial and the archbishop's degradation.

MarginaliaMarch. 21. MarginaliaThomas Cranmer Archb. of Canterbury and Martyr.AS concerning the life and estate of that moste reuerend father in God, and woorthy Prelate of godlye memorie, Thomas Cranmer late Archbishop of Canterburie, and of the originall cause and occasion of his preferment vnto hys Archiepiscopall dignitie, who of many hath bene thought to haue procured the same by friendshippe onelye, and of some other esteemed vnwoorthy of so high a vocation: It is first therefore to be noted and considered, that the same Thomas Cranmer comming of an ancient Parentage, from the conquest to be deducted, and continuing sithens in the name and familie of a Gentleman, MarginaliaThomas Cranmer a gentleman borne. was borne in a Village called Arselacton in Notinghamshire. Of whose saide name and family there remaineth at these daies one Manour and mansion house in Lincolne shire, called Cranmer Hall. &c. Some times of heritage of the saide stocke and familie.  

Commentary  *  Close

This information about Cranmer Hall came from Ralph Morrice and it reflects Cranmer's desire to magnify, if not flatly exaggerate, the status of his family.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 3, line 7 from the bottom

The Latin Edition, p. 708, says, "Puer, cum primum per ætatem imbibendis literis admoveri cœpit, literatore usus est publico ejus oppidi Asloctoniæ liturgo seu administro (parochiani sua lingua clerum vocant parochianum). Sub hoc igitur non elegantissimam nactus formationem, quum in minutioribus grammatices rudimentis aliquamdiu detritus jamque preparatus satis videretur, adolescens demum annum agens decimumquartum, Cantabrigiam grandioribus imbibendis disciplinis a matre mittitur. Erant tum ea tempora, quando, neglectis spretisque cultioris doctrinæ autoribus, fœda barbaries omnes occupabat scolas." Which is thus Englished in the Edition of 1563: "In his childehoode so soone as by the capacitie of his age hee was ready to take learning he had the parish clarke of Aslocton towne for his first teacher. Under whom not beyng very well instructed, when he had spent some tyme in the fyrst rudiments of grammer, and seemed to be well entred, being fourtene yere olde he was sent of hys mother to Cambridge to be further instructed in high learning. It was in that time," &c.

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Who being from his infancie kept at schoole, and brought vp not without much good

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ciuili-
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