Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes Penicote

Wife of Penicote the jailor.

Agnes Penicote tricked Alice Coberley into picking up a red-hot key and then mocked her for wincing at the heat, saying that Alice would therefore not be able to cope with the heat of the stake. Alice subsequently recanted. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
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Alice Coberley

Wife of William Coberley, the martyr. Of Wiltshire.

Alice Coberley was imprisoned in the penicote's (the keeper's) house while her husband was in prison. 1570, pp. 2073-74, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

She was tricked into picking up a key that the keeper's wife, Agnes Penicote, had heated in flames. When Alice winced at the pain, Agnes mocked that she would not be able to stand the flames of the stake. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
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Anthony Clee

Of Vyes, Wiltshire. Of unknown occupation.

Anthony Clee was a friend of John Maundrel. He spoke to him about the risks Maundrel was taking in returning home during Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
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Edward Lee

(1482? - 1544) (DNB)

Archbishop of York.

The pope's authority was discussed at the universities of Cambridge and Oxford, where it was concluded that Henry VIII's marriage to Catherine of Arragon was not legal, and the pope's authority was denounced. Cranmer, the earl of Wiltshire, Stokesley, Carne and Benet were then sent before the pope to deliver these conclusions. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1861. [1563 has the commission as consisting of: Cranmer, the earl of Wiltshire, Stokesley, Edward Lee, Trigonell, Carne and Bennet.]

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Cranmer's secretary wrote to Buttes and Deny asking for Dr Lee to join the commission, lest nothing be learned by the commission. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

Dr Lee was sent to Kent to join the commission. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

Lee embarked upon a visitation of the abbeys with Trigonion. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Dr Lee forced Thomas Parkinson, an anchorite, and the monks out of the Charterhouse at Thirsk. 1563, p. 1681.

 
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John Bridges

Farmer? Of Kingswood, Wiltshire.

John Maundrel probably tended Bridges' cattle during Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
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John Capon

(d. 1557)

Bishop of Salisbury (1539 - 1557). (DNB)

John Capon was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death. 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

Cranmer was asked by Dr Capon to be a founding fellow of Wolsey's college. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1753, 1583, p. 1860.

John Capon examined John Maundrel, John Spicer and William Coberley. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

The examinations of John Hunt and Richard White before the bishops of Salisbury and Gloucester (Brookes and Capon), Dr. Geffre (chancellor) took place on 26 April 1557. 1570, p. 2254, 1576, p. 1947, 1583, p. 2054.

Foxe says that John Capon died shortly before the death of Mary. [He died on 6 October 1557.] 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

[Alias Salcot.]

 
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John Maundrel

(d. 1556)

Husbandman. Martyr. Of Bullingham, Wiltshire.

John Maundrel was the son of Robert Maundrel of Rowde. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He converted to protestantism after reading Tyndale's translation of scripture. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

During Henry VIII's reign he was brought before Dr Trigonion at Edington Abbey in Wiltshire and accused of speaking against the sacrament. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He did penance in the town of Devises, Wiltshire. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

During Mary's reign, Maundrel removed to Gloucester and north of Wiltshire and moved between these areas in an attempt to avoid further persecution. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He probably stayed with John Bridges and tended his cattle during this period [Foxe is not completely sure it was Bridges]. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He returned home and spoke to a friend, Anthony Clee, at Vyes, about why he had returned home to the threat of persecution. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He conferred with William Coberley and John Spicer during Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Maundrel went with Coberley and Spicer to the parish church of Keevil and urged the parishoners, in particular Robert Barksdale, not to worship the idol carried there: the host. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He called out to the priest at Keevil that purgatory was nothing more than the pope's blindfold. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was held in the stocks until the service was over, handed to a justice and then transported to Salisbury to appear before John Capon and William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was examined by William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was offered the chance to recant and be pardoned by John St John. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Maundrel was burned at Salisbury on 24 March 1556 with William Corberley and John Spicer. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Geffre spoke to John Maundrel at the stake and bade him to recant. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2144.

Thomas Gilford, a merchant from Poole, Dorset, berated Geffre for his treatment of Maundrel. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2144.

[Note that in 1563 Foxe does not know his christian name.]

 
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John Spicer

(d. 1556)

Martyr. Bricklayer. Of Winston, Suffolk.

John Spicer went with Maundrel and Coberley to the parish church of Keevil and urged the parishoners, in particular Robert Barksdale, not to worship the host. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894. [Note that in 1563 Foxe did not know what they were examined and condemned for.]

Spicer agreed with Maundrel when Maundrel called out to the priest at Keevil that purgatory was nothing more than the pope's blindfold. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Spicer was held in the stocks until the service was over, handed to a justice and then transported to Salisbury to appear before John Capon, bishop of Salisbury and William Geffre, the chancellor. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was examined by William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, pp. 1734, 1788, 1583, pp. 1894, 2144.

On 23 March 1556 John Spicer appealed to John St John not to become guilty of the butchery of innocent men such as Spicer, Maundrel and Coberley. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Foxe records Spicer's words at the stake. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Master Beckingham attached gunpowder (given to him by Spicer's son) to John Spicer at the stake. He and the sheriff bade Spicer to be brave. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2145.

Spicer was burned at Salisbury on 24 March 1556 with William Coberley and John Maundrel. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

[He is called Robert Spicer in 1563, p. 1504., 1570, p. 2072, 1576, p. 1787.]

 
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John St John

(1505 - 1576)

Sheriff of Wiltshire (1555 - 1556). [List of Sherrifs from earliest times to AD 1831 compiled from documents in Public Records Office, London, HMSO, 1898] Probably the man who was JP for Wiltshire in 1555 [SP11/5, no. 6; Bindoff, Commons]

William Geffre was assisted in the questioning of John Maundrel, John Spicer and William Coberley by the sheriff, John St John, and the priests of Fisherton Anger. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

On 23 March 1556 John Spicer appealed to St John not to be guilty of the butchery of innocent men such as Spicer, Maundrel and Coberley. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

St John offered John Maundrel the queen's pardon if he would recant. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
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Penicote

Penicote was keeper of the jail between Salisbury and Wilton. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He held Alice Coberley, the wife of the martyr William Coberley, in his house while her husband was in prison. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
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Robert Barksdale

'Head man' (so described) of the parish of Keevil, Wiltshire.

John Maundrel, William Coberley and John Spicer exhorted Barksdale and his fellow parishoners not to worship the host carried at the church in Keevil. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Maundrel

Farmer. Of Rowde, Wiltshire.

Robert Maundrel was the father of John Maundrel, the martyr. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Trigonian

Trigonian carried out a visitation of abbeys in 1556. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

John Maundrel was called before him at Edington Abbey to answer charges of speaking against the sacrament. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

[No one of this name can be found. It is possible that Sir John Tregonwell, who was a JP in Dorset in 1555, is meant, or (less likely) Robert Trencreke, who was a JP for Cornwall at the same time.]

 
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William Coberley

(d. 1556)

Tailor. Martyr. Of Wiltshire.

He was the husband of Alice Coberley. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He went with Maundrel and Spicer to the parish church of Keevil and urged the parishoners, in particular Robert Barksdale, not to worship the idol carried there, the host. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He agreed with Maundrel when Maundrel called out to the priest at Keevil that purgatory was nothing more than the pope's blindfold. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

William Coberley was held in the stocks until the service he was trying to disrupt in Keevil was over, handed over to a justice and then transported to Salisbury to appear before John Capon and William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was examined by William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was burned at Salisbury on 24 March 1556 with John Maundrel and John Spicer. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Coberley took a very long time to die at the stake. Foxe recounts Coberley's godly patience during his burning. 1563, p. 1734, 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Geffre [or Geoffrey or Jeffrey]

D. C. L. (1540) [Foster]. Chancellor of Salisbury (1554 - 1558). [Fasti]

William Geffre took part in the examination of John Maundrel, John Spicer and William Coberley. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He presented articles against John Maundrel, John Spicer and William Coberley. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was assisted in the questioning of John Maundrel, John Spicer and William Coberley by the sheriff, John St John, and the priests of Fisherton Anger. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

William Cobberley was held in the stocks until the service he was trying to disrupt in Keevil was over, handed over to a justice and then transported to Salisbury to appear before John Capon and William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Julins Palmer's second examination at Newbury was before Dr Geffre (chancellor of Salisbury), John Winchcomb, esquire, Sir Richard Abridges, Sir William Rainford [in 1576 and 1583], and the parson of Englefield. 1570, pp. 2121-23, 1576, pp. 1844-46,1583, pp. 1938-40.

William Holcot was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

The examinations of John Hunt and Richard White before the bishops of Salisbury and Gloucester (Brookes and Capon), Dr. Geffre (chancellor) took place on 26 April 1557. 1570, p. 2254, 1576, p. 1947, 1583, p. 2054.

A beggar was sent to Geffre to be whipped for not attending mass in Collingborough. 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1955, 1583, p. 2062.

Geffre died not long after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2101.

His death prevented his examination of 90 people who had been expected to appear before him. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Tyndale

(1494? - 1536)

Biblical translator. Martyr. [DNB; David Daniell, William Tyndale: A Biography (1994)]

William Tyndale was associated with John Rogers and Miles Coverdale in translating the Bible. 1563, p. 1022, 1570, p. 1656, 1576, p. 1413, 1583, p. 1484.

Hubberdin railed against Latimer, and also railed against Luther, Melancthon, Zwingli, Frith, and Tyndale. Hubberdin danced in the pulpit. 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1639, 1583, p. 1748.

Tyndale's translation of scripture inspired the conversion of John Maundrel. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Buchamton, Buckhampton
NGR: ST 943 583

Bulkington is a tything comprised in the parish of Keevil, in the hundred of Melksham, county of Wiltshire. 4 miles east from Trowbridge. The living (of Keevil) is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Wiltshire, Diocese of Salisbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Devizes
NGR: SU 005 615

A borough and market town having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Potteme and Cannings, county of Wilts. 22 miles north-west by north from Salisbury, 19 miles east by south from Bath. Devizes comprises the parishes of St John and St Mary the Virgin, the livings of which form a united rectory, not in charge, in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Salisbury, and in the patronage of the Crown.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edyngton [Edington]
NGR: ST 924 534

A parish in the hundred ofWhorwelsdown, county of Wilts. 3.75 miles east-north-east from Westbury. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Salisbury. A house of Austin friars, called Bonne-hommes was founded here in 1358, and was worth £521 at the dissolution.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Fisherton Anger
NGR: SU 145 305

A parish in the hundred of Branch and Dale, county of Wiltshire. Separated by the river from Salisbury. The living is a discharged rectory in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Salisbury.

[Not marked on map]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Kingswoode [Kingswood]
NGR: ST 746 917

A parish in the hundred of Chippenham, county of Wilts, though locally in the hundred of Grumbold's Ash, county of Gloucester. 5.25 miles south by west from Dursley. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Gloucester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Rowd [Rowde]
NGR: ST 980 629

A parish in the hundred of Potterne and Cannings, county of Wiltshire. 2 miles west by north from Devizes. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Wiltshire, Diocese of Salisbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wiltom [Wilton]
NGR: SU 269 615

A borough, formerly a market town, and parish having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Branch and Dale, county of Wilts. 3 miles west by south from Salisbury. The living is a rectory, with that of Ditchampton and the vicarage of Bulbridge united, in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Salisbury.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1918 [1894]

Queene Mary. Persecution in Salisbury Dioces. Spicer, Maundrell, Coberley Martyrs.

MarginaliaAnno 1556. Aprill.was maruelled at of those that knew them, and did behold theyr end. And thus these two Martyrs ended their liues with great triumph: the Lord graunt we may do the like, Amen.

Persecution in the Dioces of Salisbury. 
Commentary  *  Close
Maundrel, Coberley and Spicer

In the 1563 edition, all Foxe had was a brief statement that these three martyrs were burned at Salisbury in March 1556. Foxe further complained that he had not seen any official records regarding these martyrs. This account, which first appeared in the 1570 edition, seems to have been based entirely on information supplied by individual informants. But before this another informant had sent anecdotes about Maundrel and Spicer to Foxe which Foxe received as the 1563 edition was nearing completion; these were printed in an appendix to the edition (1563, p. 1734). Except for Maundrel's remark that statues of the saints were good to roast a shoulder of mutton, which was inserted into this account in the 1570 edition (see 1563, p. 1734), these anecdotes were never integrated into the account of these three martyrs.

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MarginaliaMarch. 24. MarginaliaOther 3. Martyrs suffering at Salisbury.AFter these two women of Ipswich, succeeded iij. men which were burnt the same moneth at one fire in Salisburye, who in the like quarell with the other that went before them and led the daunce, spared not theyr bodyes, to bring their soules to the celestiall felicity, whereof they were throughly assured in Christe Iesus by his promises as soone as the furious flames of fire had put their bodyes and soules a sonder.

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Their names were


Iohn Spicer, free Mason.
William Coberly, Taylor.
Iohn Maundrell, husbandman 

Commentary  *  Close

Note Foxe's comment in the 1563 edition that he had no further information about these martyrs 'by Register' or from these friends. Foxe never acquired official records on these martyrs but as the 1563 edition was nearing completion and before the 1570 edition was printed he received quite a bit of information from individual informants.

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¶ The story of Iohn Maundrell, William Coberley, and Iohn Spicer, Martyrs.

MarginaliaThe story of Iohn Maundrell. 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 102, line 13 from the bottom

Foxe had not the ensuing account for the first Edition, but only a notice which is given {later in the text} (1563, p. 1707), at this place he says (1563, p. 1504), "What their confessions were, before whom they were examined, and by whom condempned, for as much as we have no certein knowlege, neither by Register, nor yet by other of their frendes, we can saye no more but this, that they died the true martyrs of God, for the confession of a sincere fayth in Christe Jesus, whose example we ought rather to followe in the tyme of persecution and trouble, then either for the love of worldly pleasure, or for fear of bodely death, to slip wilfully from the knowen truthe."

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FIrst, Iohn Maundrell which was the sonne of Robert Maūdrell of Rowd in the Coūty of Wiltshyre Fermer was from his childhood brought vp in husbandry, & after he came to mans state, did abide & dwell in a Village called Buchamton in the Parish of Keuel within the Coūty of Wiltshyre aforesaid, where he had wife and children, being of good name and fame. MarginaliaMaundrell conuerted first by Tindalls Testament. Maundrell an earnest louer and hearer of Gods word.Which Iohn Maundrell, after that the scripture was translated into English by the faith full Apostle of Englande, W. Tindall, became a diligent hearer and a feruent embracer of Gods true Religion, so that he delighted in nothing so much, as to heare and speak of Gods word, neuer being without the new Testamēt about him, although he could not read himselfe. But when he came into any cōpany that could read, his book was alwaies ready, hauing a very good memory: so that he could recite by hart most places of the new testamēt, his conuersation and liuing being very honest and charitable as his neighbors are able to testify.

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So it was, that in the dayes of King Henry the eight at what time Doctour Trigonion, and Doctour Lee dyd visite Abbayes, the sayd Iohn Maundrell, was brought before Doctour Trigonion at an Abbey called Edyngton within in the Countye of Wiltshyre aforesayde: MarginaliaMaundrell accused for speaking agaynst holy bread and holy water.where he was accused that he had spoken agaynst the holy water & holy bread and such like ceremonyes, MarginaliaMaundrell put to open pennance in K. Henryes dayes.and for the same dyd weare a white sheete bearing a candle in his hand aboute the market in the Towne of the Deuises, which is in the sayd coūty. Neuertheles his feruēcy did not abate, but by Gods mercifull assistaunce he tooke better hold, as the sequele hereof will declare.

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For in the dayes of Queene Mary, when popery was restored agayne and Gods true religion put to silence, the sayd Iohn Maūdrell left his owne house and departed into the County of Glocestershyre and into the North part of Wiltshyre, wandring from one to an other to such men as he knew feared GOD, with whome as a seruaunt to keepe their cattell, he there did remayne, with Iohn Bridges or some other at Kingeswoode: but after a time he returned to his country, and there comming to the Veys to a frend of his named MarginaliaAnthony Clee of Veys.Anthony Clee, had talk & conference with him in a Garden of returning home to his house.

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And when the other exhorted hym by the woordes of Scripture, to flye from one Citty to an other, he replying agayne by the wordes of the Apocalips. 21. of them that be fearefull. &c. sayd that he needes must go home, and so did. Where he with Spicer and Coberley vsed at times to resort and conferre together.

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At length vpon the Sonday folowing they agreed together to go to the parish Church called Keuell, where the sayd Iohn Maundrell & the other two, seing the parishioners in the procession to folow & worship the Idoll there caried, MarginaliaMaundrell, Spicer, and Coberley speaking agaynst the procession.aduertised thē to leaue the same & to return to the liuing god, namely speaking to one Rob. Barkesdale head man of the Parish, but he tooke no regard to these wordes.

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After this the Vicare came into the Pulpit, who there being about to read his beadroll and to pray for the soules in Purgatory, MarginaliaMaundrell calleth Purgatory the Popes pinfolde.the sayde Iohn Maundrell speaking wyth an audible voyce sayd: that that was the Popes pinfolde: the other two affirming the same. After which wordes, by commaūdement of the Priest, they were had to the stocks, where they remained till theyr seruice was done, and then were brought before a Iustice of peace, and so the next day caried to Salisbury all three, and presented before Bishop

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MarginaliaMaundrell, Spicer, Coberly, sēt to Salisbury.Capon, MarginaliaD. Capon B. of Salisbury.and W. Geffrey being Chauncellor of the Dioces. By whom they were imprisoned and oftētimes examined of theyr fayth in theyr houses, but seldome openly. And at theyr last examination these were the Articles, whiche the Chauncellour alledged agaynst them, being accompanied with the Sheriffe of the shyre, one M. Saint Iohns, & other Popishe Priestes in the Parish Church of Fisherton Anger, demaunding how they did beleue.

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MarginaliaConfession of their beliefe.They aunswered: as christen men should and ought to beleue: and first they sayd they beleued in God the Father, and in the Sonne, and in the holy ghost, the xij. articles of the Creed, the holy Scripture from the first of Genesis to the last of the Apocalips.

But that faythe the Chauncellour woulde not allowe. Wherefore he apposed them in particular Articles: MarginaliaSacrament of the Aultar.Firste whether that they did not beleue that in the Sacrament of the aulter (as he termed it) after the wordes of consecratiō spoke by the priest at masse, there remayned no substaunce of bread nor wine, but Christes body flesh and bloud as he was borne of the virgine Mary. Whereunto they aunswered negatiuely, saying that the popish masse was abhominable Idolatry and iniurious to the bloud of Christ: but confessing that in a faythfull Congregation, receiuing the Sacrament of Christs body and bloud, being duely ministred according to Christes institution, Christes body and bloud is spiritually receiued of the faythfull beleuer.

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Also, being asked whether the Pope was supreame head of the Churche, and Christes Vicar on earth: MarginaliaAgaynst the Popes supremacye.they aunswered negatiuely, saying that the Byshop of Rome doth vsurpe ouer Emperours and Kinges beyng Antichrist and Gods enemy.

The Chauncellour sayde: will you haue the Churche without a head?

They aunswered: MarginaliaChrist onely Supreame head of his Church: vnder him euery Prince in his own dominion.Christ was head of his Church, and vnder Christ the Queenes maiesty. What, sayd the Chaūcellour? a woman head of the church? Yea sayd they, within her graces dominions.

Also that the soules in purgatory were deliuered by þe Popes pardons and the suffrages of the Church?

They said they beleued faithfully that þe bloud of Christ had purged theyr sinnes and the sinnes of al thē that were saued, vnto the end of þe world, so that they feared nothing the Popes Purgatory MarginaliaPurgatory.or estemed his pardons.

Also, whether Images MarginaliaImages.were necessary to be in the churches, as lay mens bookes, and Sayntes to be prayed vnto and worshipped.

They answered negatiuely: Iohn Maundrell adding that wooden Images were good to rost a shoulder of mutton, but euill in the Church: 

Commentary  *  Close

This remark was first printed in an appendix to the 1563 edition as part of a larger anecdote about Maundrel (1563, p. 1734) and then integrated into this account in the 1570 edition.

whereby Idolatry was committed. Those Articles thus aunswered (for theyr Articles were one, and theyr aunsweres in maner like) MarginaliaSentence read agaynst these 3. Martyrs.the Chauncellor read theyr condemnation, & so deliuered them to the Shiriffe. Then spake Iohn Spycer, saying: Oh M. Sheriffe, now must you be theyr butcher, that you may be guilty also with them of innocent bloud before the Lord. MarginaliaMarch: 23.This was the 23. day of March, an. 1556. & the 24. day of the same Moneth MarginaliaMaundrell, Spicer, Coberly, brought to the place of Martyrdome.they were caryed out of the common Gayle to a place betwixt Salisbury & Wiltom, where were ij. postes set for them to be burnt at. Whiche men commyng to the place kneled downe and made theyr prayers secretly together, & then being disclothed to theyr shyrtes, Iohn Maūdrell spake with a loud voyce: MarginaliaThe wordes of Maundrell.not for all Salisbury. Which wordes mē iudged to be an aunswere to the Shiriffe, which offred him the queenes pardō if he would recant. And after that in like maner spake Iohn Spicer saying: this is the ioyfullest day that euer I sawe. Thus were they 3. burnt at two stakes: where most constauntly they gaue theyr bodyes to the fire and theyr soules to the Lord for testimony of his trueth.

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MarginaliaAlice Coberley being indurance, how she was brought by the keepers to reuoke.As touching William Coberley, this moreouer is to be noted, that his wife also, called Alice, beyng apprehended, was in the kepers house the same time deteined while her husbande was in prison. Where the keepers wife named Agnes Penycote, had secretlye heated a key fire hoate, and laid it in grasse on the backeside. So speaking to Alice Coberley to fet her the key in all haste, þe said Alice went with speed to bring the key, and so taking vp the key in hast did pitiously burne her hand. Wherupon she crying out at the sodein burning of her hand: Ah thou drabbe, quoth þe other thou that canst not abide the burning of the key, howe wilt thou be able to burne the whole body, and so she afterward reuoked. But to returne agayne to the story of Coberley, who being somewhat learned, and being at the stake was somewhat long a burning as the wynde stoode. After his bodye was skorched with the fire, and hys leafte Arme drawne and taken from hym by the violence of the fyre the fleshe beinge burnt to the whyte boane, at length he stouped ouer the cheyne, and wyth the ryghte hande

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