Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Apprice, John

(d. 1556)

Blind man. Martyr. Of Essex. St Thomas Apostles [Fines]; [Machyn, Diary, p. 105.]

John Apprice was examined and condemned by Bishop Bonner 1 May 1556 for disputing doctrine. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, pp. 1909-10.

He was imprisoned in Newgate. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, pp. 1909-10.

On 9 May 1556 he appeared in the consistory court of St Paul's and refused to recant. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, pp. 1909-10.

On 15 May 1556 he was burned at Stratford-le-Bow with Hugh Laverock. 1563, p. 1519, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, pp. 1909-10.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bartlett Green

(1530 - 1556)

Gentleman and lawyer. Martyr. Of Basinghall, City of London. [DNB]

A letter was exhibited by Bonner, concerning the handling of Bartlett Green. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

In the letter exhibited by Bonner about Bartlett Green, reference was made to John Dee and Feckenham. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, pp. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

Foxe records Green's formative years. 1563, p. 1458, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Foxe discusses Green's character. 1563, p. 1458, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Green's thoughts on pride and gluttony were written in a book belonging to Bartham Calthorp, 20 January 1556. 1563, p. 1458, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Green's grandfather, Dr Bartlett, offered him great livings if he would recant. 1563, p. 1458, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Green wrote of his dealings with Christopher Goodman, exile, whom he had been friends with during Edward's reign. 1563, p. 1459, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, pp. 1743-44, 1583, p. 1851.

Green wrote a letter to Christopher Goodman that declared that the queen was not dead. It fell into the hands of some catholics. 1563, p. 1459, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Green wrote a letter to John Philpot which was not delivered. According to Foxe it was either not delivered because Philpot died or because the jailor prevented its delivery. 1563, pp. 1459-60, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, pp. 1852-53.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee [not listed here as Dr] were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Evidence on Green's doctrine was given by Welch. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, pp. 1852-53.

A discussion of scripture and civil law was planned for Bonner and Dr Dale with Green. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A letter regarding Green's treason was sent to Bonner by the privy council on 11 November 1555 but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed by Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, pp. 1851-52.

Chedsey testified against Green, and reported that in the presence of M. Mosley and the lieutenant of the Tower Green had spoken against transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

Welch spoke privately to Bartlett Green as he feared for him. 1563, pp. 1461-62, 1570, p. 2024, 1576, pp. 1744-45, 1583, pp. 1852-53.

Bartlett Green met with John Dee, who was very friendly to him. 1563, p. 1462, 1570, p. 2024, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1853.

Green discussed eucharistic doctrine with Welch. 1563, p. 1463, 1570, p. 2024, 1576, p. 1745, 1583, p. 1853.

Foxe recounts Bonner's charges and Green's answers to the charges. 1563, pp. 1451-54, 1570, pp. 2024-25, 1576, p. 1745, 1583, p. 1853.

Foxe records Green's confession. 1563, p. 1463, 1570, p. 2025, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, pp. 1853-54.

Green was condemned with Thomas Whittle, John Tudson, John Went, Thomas Browne, Isabel Foster, and Joan Lashford. 1570, p. 2025, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, p. 1853.

Feckenham (dean of St Paul's) held discussions with Green. 1563, pp. 1463-64, 1570, pp. 2025-26, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, p. 1854.

Bonner and Pendleton questioned Green. 1563, p. 1464, 1570, p. 2026,, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, pp. 1854-55.

Green wrote a farewell verse in a book of Master Hussey of the Temple 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

Green wrote a farewell verse in a book of William Fleetwood. 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

Green was beaten and scourged by Bonner. He later told Cotten of the Temple about it. 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

Green was burned at Smithfield on 27 January 1556. 1563, p. 1451, 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 2856.

Latin verses were repeated by Green and his fellow sufferers at the stake. 1563, p. 1465, 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

John Careless wrote a letter to Bartlett Green, Thomas Whittle, Joan Warren, Isabel Foster and certain other prisoners in Newgate. 1570, p. 2107, 1576, p. 1818, 1583, pp. 1924-25.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1465-1466, 1570, pp. 2027-28, 1576, pp. 1747-48, 1583, pp. 1855-56.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Christopher Lyster

(d. 1556)

Husbandman. Martyr. Of Dagenham.

Christopher Lyster was delivered to John Kingstone, bachelor of civil law, and then commissory to Gardiner, by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

Articles were brought against him which he answered. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, pp. 2089-90, 1576, pp. 1802-03, 1583, p. 1909.

He was burned at Colchester on 28 April 1556. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hugh Laverock

(1488? - 1556)

Lame old man. Painter. Martyr. Of Barking, Essex.

Hugh Laverock was examined by Bishop Bonner 1 May 1556 for disputing doctrine. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1910.

He was imprisoned in Newgate. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1910.

On 9 May 1556 he appeared in the consistory court of St Paul's and refused to recant. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1910.

On 15 May 1556 he was burned at Stratford-le-Bow with John Apprice. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2090, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1910.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Hamond

(d. 1556)

Tanner. Martyr. Of Colchester.

John Hamond was delivered to John Kingstone, bachelor of civil law, and then commissory to Gardiner, by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1909.

Foxe records the articles against him and his answers. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, pp. 2089-90, 1576, pp. 1802-03, 1583, p. 1909.

He was burned at Colchester on 28 April 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Kingston

Commissary to bishop of London and bachelor of law.

John Hamond, Simon Hamond, Christopher Lyster, John Mace, John Spencer, and Richard Nicholas were delivered to John Kingstone by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1909.

John Kingston wrote a letter to Bonner on 30 August 1557 about the taking of 22 people charged with heresy to London. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576], 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Rose Allin was charged with heresy and delivered to John Kingston and then to Bonner. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2200, 1576, p. 1898, 1583, p. 2007.

William Goodwin and Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

In his letter to Bonner, Kingston said that Alsey was to deliver 22 people to Bonner for examination. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Lord Darcy of Chiche said to John Kinstone and William Bendelows that the prisoners they held in Canterbury should remain where they were until sent for by Bonner. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Kingston complained to Bonner that he had not been able so far to carry out a visitation on many foundations in Colchester, such as the masters and lazars of Mary Magdalen, the proctor of St Katherine's chapel, the hospital and beadmen of the foundation of Lord H. Marney in Layer-Marney, and the hospital and beadmen of Little Horksley. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

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On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. Kingston was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

A supplication was made against William Mount, his wife and their daughter, Rose, to Lord Darcy of Chiche, who then delivered the supplication to John Kingston. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Kingston took part in the examination of several prisoners in Colchester on 19 October 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Mace

(d. 1556)

Apothecary. Martyr. Of Colchester.

John Mace was delivered to John Kingstone, bachelor of civil law, and then commissory to Gardiner, by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

Articles were brought against him which he answered. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, pp. 2089-90, 1576, pp. 1802-03, 1583, p. 1909.

He was burned at Colchester on 28 April 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Spencer

(d. 1556)

Weaver. Martyr. Of Colchester.

John Spencer was delivered to John Kingstone, bachelor of civil law, and then commissory to Gardiner, by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1909.

Articles were brought against Spencer and he gave answers. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, pp. 2089-90, 1576, pp. 1802-03, 1583, p. 1909.

He was burned at Colchester on 28 April 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Nichols

(d. 1556)

Weaver. Martyr. Of Colchester.

Richard Nichols was delivered to John Kingstone, bachelor of civil law, and then commissory to Gardiner, by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

Articles were brought against him and he gave answers. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, pp. 2089-90, 1576, pp. 1802-03, 1583, p. 1909.

He was burned at Colchester on 28 April 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Drakes

(d. 1556)

Priest. Martyr. Of Thundersley, Essex.

Robert Drakes was made a deacon by Rowland Taylor, at the commandment of Thomas Cranmer. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

In third year of Edward's reign, Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley admitted Drakes to minister the sacraments. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Drakes was presented to the benefice of Thundersley by Lord Rich, at the suit of Master Causton and Master Treheron. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

He was sent up to London by Lord Rich, Tyrrell and others for examination. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

He remained in either the Marshalsea or the King's Bench for around one year, until the death of Gardiner. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Drakes was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [note that 1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

After Gardiner's death some of Drakes' fellow prisoners sent a petition to Heath after he replaced Gardiner as lord chancellor on behalf of them all. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

He was condemned by Bonner on 28 March 1556. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

He was burned 24 April 1556 at Smithfield with William Tyms, Richard Spurge, Thomas Spurge, John Cavel, and George Ambrose. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Drakes was one of the recipients of a letter by John Careless to his condemned brethren in Newgate. 1563, pp. 1449-50, 1570, pp. 2105-06, 1576, pp. 1817-18, 1583, pp. 1923-24.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Roger Grasbroke

Roger Grasbroke was examined in Essex and later submitted. 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Simon Joyne

(d. 1556)

Sawyer. Martyr. Of Colchester.

Simon Joyne was delivered to John Kingstone, bachelor of civil law, and then commissory to Gardiner by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1804, 1583, p. 1909.

Articles were brought against him, which he answered. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, pp. 2089-90, 1576, pp. 1802-03, 1583, p. 1909.

He was burned at Colchester on 28 April 1556. 1563, p. 1518, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1802, 1583, p. 1909.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Tyms

(d. 1556)

Deacon and curate of Hockley in Essex. Martyr.

William Tyms was sent up to London by Lord Rich, Tyrrell and others for examination. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

When Tyms was brought before Tyrrell, he spoke to him for over three hours without witness, although his words were overheard and so reported to Foxe. 1570, p. 2075, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1896.

Tyms was sent before Bonner, who sent him to Gardiner for examination. 1570, p. 2075, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1896.

He remained in the King's Bench for around one year, until the death of Gardiner. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

In a letter Tyms wrote to 'God's faithful servants', he named his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench as Robert Ferrar, Rowland Taylor, John Philpot, John Bradford and five other Sussex men. 1570, p. 2082, 1576, p. 1795, 1583, p. 1902.

After Gardiner's death some of his fellow prisoners sent a petition to Heath, after he replaced Gardiner as lord chancellor, on behalf of all of them. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, pp. 1788-9, 1583, p. 1895.

Tyms was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [note that 1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

On 23 March he appeared with Drakes before Bonner. 1570, p. 2076, 1570, p. 1790, 1583, p. 1896.

Articles against him were read in the consistory of St Paul's and he was then condemned by Bonner. 1570, p. 2077, 1576, p. 1791, 1583, pp. 1896-97.

Tyms was burned around 24 April 1556 at Smithfield. 1563, p. 1506, 1570, p. 2077, 1576, pp. 1791-92, 1583, p. 1604.

John Careless told Thomas Martyn that he had sent articles to Tyms, his bedfellow in the King's Bench, who had been burned the day before. 1563, p. 1532.

Letters. 1563, p. 1513, 1570, pp. 2077-82, 1576, pp. 1792-96, 1583, pp. 1898-1900.

Tyms was one of the recipients of a letter by John Careless to his condemned brethren in Newgate. 1563, pp. 1449-50, 1570, pp. 2105-06, 1576, pp. 1817-18, 1583, pp. 1923-24.

John Careless wrote a letter to William Tyms. 1570, pp. 2107-08, 1576, pp. 1818-19, 1583, pp. 1925-26.

William Tyms wrote a letter to unnamed recipients. 1583, p. 2142.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Dagenham
NGR: TQ 485 845

A parish in the hundred of Becontree, county of Essex. 3.5 miles south by west from Romford. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Essex, Diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1933 [1909]

Queene Mary. Sixe Martyrs burned at Colchester.

MarginaliaAnno 1556. May.godly prayer, whiche if any be disposed to peruse, it is extant in the old booke of Acts, to be found, pag. 1515.

The death and Martyrdome of sixe constant professours of Christ, burned at Colchester, for the testimonie of the Gospell, the 28. day of Aprill. 
Commentary  *  Close
Christopher Lister and Five Other Martyrs

The entire account of these martyrs first appeared in the 1563 edition; there were no changes to it in subsequent editions. All of this material came from official records, probably from a court book of Bishop Bonner's which is now lost.

MarginaliaAprill. 28. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of 6. men at Colchester.NOt long after the death of Robert Drakes, William Tymmes, and the other Essex Martyrs, executed in Smithfielde, as is aboue specified, followed in the same order likewise of martyrdome, at one like fire in the town of Colchester (where the most parte of them did inhabite) sixe other blessed Martyrs, whose names be these:

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Christopher Lyster, of Dagneham, Husbandman.
Iohn Mace, of Colchester, Apothecarie. 

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John Mace was a figure of some prominence in Colchester; he had been sergeant-at-arms of the city until the end of Edward's reign. He was also the brother-in-law of Thomas Dybney, a Colchester alderman who was brought before the privy council in May 1556 and forced publicly to recant his religious convictions.

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Joan Dybney, Thomas Dybney's daughter-in-law, was harassed for her protestant beliefs in Mary's reign and fled into exile (Laquita M. Higgs, Godliness and Governance in Tudor Colchester [Ann Arbor, MI: 1998] pp. 170-71 and 1563, p. 1678). Joan Dybney was also the mother, by a previous marriage, of Thomas Firefanne who would be one of 22 protestants arrested in Colchester and brought to London for trial (Higgs, Godliness and Governance, pp. 224-25).

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Iohn Spenser of Colchester, Weauer.
Symon Ioyne, Sawyer.
Richard Nichols, of Colchester, Weauer. 
Commentary  *  Close

Nichols was one of the protestant prisoners in Newgate, led by William Tyms, whom Henry Hart, the leader of the freewillers, tried to convert. Nichols joined the other prisoners in denouncing Hart. (See ECL 260, fo. 87r-v; also see 1563, p. 1530. For a discussion of the episode see Thomas Freeman, 'Dissenters from a DissentingChurch: The Challenge of the Freewillers, 1550-1558' in Peter Marshall and Alec Ryrie,eds., The Beginnings of English Protestantism [Cambridge: 2002], pp. 140-41).

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Iohn Hamond, of Colchester, Tanner. 
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In 1530, John Hammond had been forced to recant his religious covictions (Laquita Higgs, Godliness and Governance in Tudor Colchester [Ann Arbor, MI: 1998], pp. 111 and 172).

MarginaliaRoger Grasbroke.With these sixe was also ioyned an other, whose name was Roger Grasbroke, but he afterwarde submitted him selfe. These aboue named, the Byshoppe, because he (as it semeth by the short processe recorded by his register) waxed now weary, made a very quicke dispatch. For soone after that, they were deliuered vnto one MarginaliaIohn Kingston B. Boners Cōmissary in Essex.Iohn Kingstone, Bacheler of Ciuil law, and then Commissarye to the Bishop, by the Earle of Oxford & other Commissioners (as appeareth by a bil endented,made betwene the Commissioners and the said Commissary, for the receit of the MarginaliaThese Martyrs were deliuered by the Earle of Oxford to the Commissary, & by the Commissary sent to the Bishop.sayd prisoners, dated the 28. day of Marche, Anno regni regis & Reginæ Philippi & Mariæ secundo & tertio: 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative
Foxe text Latin

Anno regni Regis & Reginae, Philippi & Mariae, secundo & tertio.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Cattley-Pratt 1877, viii, 86)

in the second and third year of the king and queen, Philip and Mary

which is the yere of our Lord 1556.) and by him sent vp vnto hys Lord and Maister, the Bishop caused them to be broughte vnto hys house at Fulham: Where in the open Churche, iudicially were ministred vnto them þe same Articles that were propounded vnto Bartlet Grene and others, mentioned before. To the whych they made their seuerall answeres, agreeing altogether in one truthe, as by the summe and effect thereof heere ensuing, more plainly appeareth.

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MarginaliaTheir answeres to the Bishops articles.1 To the first article they al consented and agreed: Iohn Spenser adding further thereto, MarginaliaThe Church of Rome no part of Christes Catholicke church.that the churche malignant, which is the Church of Rome) is no parte of Christes Catholike church: and that he neither hath, nor dothe beleeue the doctrine and religion, taughte and set foorth in the sayd Romish and maligant church.

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Marginalia2. Sacramentes.2 To the second they aunswered: that they beleeued that in the true Catholike church of Christe, there be but two sacraments: that is to say, the sacrament of Baptisme, and the sacrament of the body and bloud of Christ.

MarginaliaProfession of Baptisme.3 To the third article they al agreed, confessing that they were Baptised in the Faith and beliefe of the Catholicke church, and that their Godfathers and Godmothers had professed and promised for them as is contained in þe same Article.

4 To the fourth they answered: that they alwaies were and yet then did cōtinue in the faith and profession, wherin they were baptised: Richarde Nichols adding also: that he had more plainely learned the truth of his profession by the doctrine set forth in king Edward the 6. his daies, and thereupon he had builded his faithe, and would cōtinue in the same to hys liues ende, God assisting him.

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MarginaliaTo deny the beggerly vsages of the Popes Church is not to deny the Catholicke fayth of Christ.5 To the fifth they answeared, that they neither swarued nor went away from the Catholicke faith of Christ. How beit they confessed, that within the time articulate (and before they hadde misliked, and earnestly spoken against the sacrifice of the Masse, and against the sacrament of the altare, affirming that they woulde not come to heare or bee partakers therof, because they hadde and then did beleeue, that they were set foorth and vsed contrary to Gods woord and glory. And moreouer they did graunt that they hadde spoken against the vsurped authoritye of the B. of Rome, as an oppressor of Christes Church and Gospell, MarginaliaThe pope ought to haue no authoritye in England.and that he ought not to haue any authoritye in Englande. For all which sayings they were no whit sorie, but rather reioyced and were glad.

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6 To the sixt they answered, that they neuer refused, nor yet then presently did refuse to be reconciled to the vnitye of Christes Catholicke church, but they said they had, and then did, and so euer woulde heereafter vtterlye refuse to come to the MarginaliaThe Church of Rome to be abhorred.churche of Rome, or to acknowledge the authority of the seat hereof, but did vtterly abhorre the same, for putting downe the booke of God the Bible, and setting vp the Babylonicall Masse, wyth all other of Antichristes marchaundise.

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7 To the seuenth article, the effect therof they all graun-

ted. And Symonde Ioyne declared further, MarginaliaAgainst the Popes trumpery.that the cause of hys refusing to be partaker of theyr trumperie, was for that the commandements of God were there broken, and Christes ordinaunces chaunged and put oute, and the B. of Romes ordinances in steade thereof put in. MarginaliaAgaynst transubstātiation.Moreouer, as touching the sacrament of Christes body, Christopher Lister affirmed that in the sayde Sacrament there is the substance of breade and wine, as well after the woordes of consecration as before, and that there is not in the same the very body and bloud of Christ really, substātially, and truely, but onely Sacramentally and spiritually by Faith in the faithfull receiuers, and that the MarginaliaAgainst the Masse.Masse is not propiciatorie, for the quicke or for the dead, but meere Idolatrie and abhomination.

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8 To the eight they sayde, that they were sent to Colchester prison by the king and Queenes Commissioners, because they would not come to theyr parish Churches, and by them sent vnto the bishop of London, to be therof further examined.

9 To the ninth they al generally agreed, that that which they had saide in the premisses was true, & that they were of the Diocesse of London.

These aunsweres thus made, the Bishop did dismisse them for that present vntill the after noone. At which time hauing firste their articles and aunsweres red vnto them againe, and they standing most firmly vnto theyr Christian profession, they were by diuers waies and meanes assaied and tried if they would reuoke the same their professed faith, and returne to the vnitie of Antichristes church.

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The burning of the foresayde sixe men at Colchester. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Christopher Lister, Iohn Mace, Iohn Spencer, Symon Ioyne, Richard Nicols, Iohn Hamond, at Colchester. Anno. 1556. Aprill. 28.

woodcut [View a larger version]

Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
Reuse of the illustration that had served the six of Canterbury in 1555.

MarginaliaSentence geuen agaynst them by B. Boner.Which thing when they refused, the bishop stoutly pronounced the sentence of cōdemnation against them, committing them vnto the temporall power. Who vppon the receit of the king and Quenes wryt, 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., the writ authorizing the execution of the heretics. It was illegal for an execution for heresy to proceed without such a writ.

sent them vnto Colchester, where the 28. day of Aprill, most chearefully they ended theyr liues to the glory of Gods holy name, and the great incouragement of others.

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Hugh Lauerocke an olde lame man, Iohn Apprice a blide man, Martyrs, burned at Stratford the Bowe. 
Commentary  *  Close
Hugh Laverock and John Apprice

With the exception of a brief description of the burning of Laverock and Apprice which was added in the 1570 edition, the account of these martyrs first appeared in the 1563 edition and it remained unchanged. It was based entirely on official records, probably a court book of Bishop Bonner's which is now lost - except for the description of the burning of Laverock and Apprice, which probably came from an eyewitness.

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MarginaliaMay. 15. Two burned together at one stake, Hugh Lauerrocke an olde lame man, and Iohn Apprice a blynd man.IN the discourse of thys parcell or parte of Hystorie, I knowe not, whether more to maruaile at the greate and vnsearchable mercies of God (wyth whome there is no respecte in degrees of parsones, but he choseth as well the poore, lame, and blinde, as the rich, mighty, and healthful, to sette foorth hys glory) or els to note the vnreasonable or rather vnnaturall doings of these vnmerciful catholickes 

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Note that in the 1570 edition, this passage was toned down considerably; in the 1563 edition, Foxe denounced Bonner and his clerics as 'most cruel papists' and 'horseleeches'.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 140, fn 1

"The greedy and unsatiable tyranny of the most cruel papists, and, rather, bloody horseleeches; I mean Bonner and his complices." See Edit. 1563, p. 1519. - ED.

(I meane B. Boner, and his complices) in whome was so little fauour or mercye to all sortes and kindes of men, that also they spared neither impotente age, neither lame, nor blinde, as may well appeare by these poore creatures, whose names and stories heere vnder followe.

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Hugh
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