Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
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Gregory Crow

Fuller. Of Malden, Essex.

Crow was preserved from drowning off the Kentish coast by the miraculous power of his New Testament. (Morse received the account from a relative of Crow dwelling in Leigh, and related it to John Foxe). 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1913.

 
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Sir John Brodish

Parish priest of Mendlesham in Suffolk.

When Sir John Tyrrel persecuted certain parishioners of the town and forced them to flee Mendlesham, he was assisted in this persecution by Sir John Brodish, the parish priest. 1563, p. 1522, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1806, 1583, p. 1912.

 
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Thomas Morse

Merchant. Of Leigh

Thomas Morse provided Foxe with the account of Gregory Crow and of three men also saved at sea. 1570, pp. 2093-94, 1576, pp. 1806-07, 1583, pp. 1913-14.

 
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Leigh [Leigh-on-Sea°]
NGR: TQ 844 865

A parish in the hundred of Rochford, county of Essex. 17.5 miles south-east by south from Chelmsford. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Essex and Diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Maldon
NGR: TL 845 075

A borough, port and market town having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Dengie, county of Essex. 10 miles east from Chelmsford, 38 miles east-north-east from London. The borough comprises the parishes of All Saints, St Peter and St Mary, the first two in the Archdeaconry of Essex, diocese of London, the third a royal peculiar in the jurisdiction of the Dean and Canons of Westminster. The living of All Saints is a vicarage, with which that of St Peter is united. The living of St Mary is a perpetual curacy in the patronage of the Dean and Canons.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1937 [1913]

Queene Mary. A story of Gregory Crow maruelously preserued on the Seas.

MarginaliaAnno 1556. Maye.Besides those that were constrained to do against their conscience, by the helpe of the parishe Priest, whose name was sir Iohn Brodish.

¶ These be the chiefe causes why those aboue named were persecuted.

MarginaliaThe fayth and doctrine of these Confessours.FIrst, they did hold and beleeue the holy word of God, to be the sufficient doctrine vnto their saluation.

Secondly, they denied the Popes vsurped authoritie, and did hold all that church of Antichrist to be Christs aduersaries. And further, refused the abused sacraments, defied the masse and all popish seruice and ceremonies, saying, they robbed God of his honour, & Christ of his death and glory, and would not come at the Church, without it were to the defacying of that they did there.

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Thirdly, they did hold that the ministers of the church by Gods word, might lawfully marry.

Fourthly, they helde the Queene to be as chiefe head, and wicked rulers to bee a great plague sent of God for sinne, &c.

Fiftly, they denied mans free will, and that the Popes Church did erre, and many other in that point with them, rebuking their false confidence in workes, and their false trust in mans righteousnesse. Also when anye rebuked those persecuted for goyng so openly, and talking so freely: their aunswere was, they knowledged, confessed, and beleeued, and therefore they must speake: and that their tribulation was Gods good wyll and prouidence, & that hys iudgements were right, to punish them with other for their sinnes, and that of very faythfulnesse and mercy, God had caused them to be troubled, so that one haire of their heds should not perish before the tyme, but al things should worke vnto the best to them that loue GOD, and that Christ Iesus was their lyfe and onely righteousnes, and that onelye by fayth in hym, and for hys sake, all good thyngs were freely geuen them, also forgiuenesse of sinnes, and lyfe euerlastyng. MarginaliaWitnessed by the faythfull report of Suffolke men.

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Many of these persecuted, were of great substance, and had possessions of theyr owne.

Geue God the praise.

¶ For so much 

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Gregory Crow

These stories of providential rescues on the seas first appear in the 1570 edition and were, as Foxe states, sent to the martyrologist by a merchant named Thomas Morse. These stories are wonderful examples of the continuing belief among protestants, as well as catholics, of belief in providence and of direct divine intervention in human affairs. (For a magisterial discussion of this point, see Alexandra Walsham, Divine Providence in Early Modern England [Oxford: 1999]).

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as we are now in the moneth of May, before we ouerpasse the same, and because the story is not long, and not vnworthy peraduenture of notyng, it shall not grieue the studious Reader, a litle to geue the hearing thereof, whereby to learne to meruaile and muse at the great workes of the Lord. They that go downe (sayeth the Psalme) into the sea, labouryng vpon the water, haue sene the workes of the Lord, and his mighty wonders vpon the deep. Psal. 106. MarginaliaPsalm. 106. &c. The truth whereof may well appeare in this story followyng: which story as it is signified and written to me by relation of the partie himselfe which was doer therof called Thomas Morse, so I thought to purporte the same as followeth.

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¶ A story of one Gregory Crowe, meruailously preserued with hys new Testament vpon the Seas. May. 26.

MarginaliaA story of Gregory Crow maruelously preserued vpon the Sea with his new Testament.VPon Tuesday after Whitsonday, which was the 26. day of May, in this present yeare. 1556. (or els, as hee rather thinketh, in the yeare next before, which was 1555.) a certayne poore man, whose name was Gregory Crowe dwelling in Maulden, went to the Sea, mynding to haue gone into Kent for Fullyng earth, but by the way beyng foule weather, was driuen vpon a Sand, where presently the boate sanke, and was ful of water, so that the mē were forced to hold themselues by the mast of the boate, and all thyngs that would swimme dyd swimme out of her. Amongest which Crowe saw hys Testament in the water, and caught it and put it in hys bosome. MarginaliaCrowes boat broken vpon the sand.Nowe it was ebbyng water, so that within one houre, the boat was dry, but broken, so as they coulde not saue her, but they went themselues vpon the sand (beyng x. myles at the lest from the land) & there made their prayers together, that God would send some ship that way to saue them (beyng two men & one boy in all:) for they might not tary vppon the sand but halfe an houre, but it would be floud. In þe which tyme they found their chest wherin was mony to the sūme of v. pound vj. shillings viij. pence, the which money the man that was with the said Crow (whose name I know not) tooke & gaue it to Crowe who was owner thereof, MarginaliaCrow taketh his Testament and casteth his money away.& he cast it into the sea, saying: if the Lord wil saue our liues he wil prouide vs a liuyng, and so they went vpon þe mast there, hangyng by the armes and legs for the space of ten houres, MarginaliaThe boy beaten with Sea, and drowned.in the which tyme the boy was so weary, & beaten with the sea, that he fell of and was drowned.

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And when the water was gone agayne, and the sande dry, Crowe said to his man, It were best for vs to take downe our mastes, and when the floud commeth we will sit vpon them, and so it may please GOD to bryng vs to some ship that may take vs vp. Which thing they did, and so at x. of the clocke in the night of the same Tuesday, the floud did beare vp the mast whereupon they sate.

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MarginaliaCrowes man dead vpon the Maste.And vpon the Wednesday in the night, the man dyed, beyng ouercome with hunger and watchyng. MarginaliaGregory Crow driuen vpon the Seas sitting vpon a Maste.So there was none left but this Crow, who driuyng vp & downe in the sea, callyng vpon God as he could, and myght not sleepe for feare that the sea would haue beaten him of.

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So at length I my selfe (sayth Thomas Morse) being laden to Antwarpe with my Crayer, goyng from Lee vpon Friday, hauyng within my Crayer  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 149, line 10

A small ship with one mast; see Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic words; Todd's Johnson. In Adelung's "Glossarium mediæ et inf. Latinitatis" we read, under Craiera, "navis piratica. Gall. olim Craier, Créer et Croyer." See Shakspeare, Cymb. Act iv. sc. 2; ... and Hall's Chronicle, p. 866, edit. 1809.

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of Mariners and merchants, to the number of 46. persons, and so comming to the Foreland, the wynde was not very good, MarginaliaGods prouidence to be noted.so that I was constrained to go somewhat out of my way, beyng in the after noone about 6. of the clock where at the last we saw a thing a far of, appearing vnto vs like a small Boye, that fishermen do vse to lay with their hookes.

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When we saw it, some sayd, let vs haue some fish, And I sayd to him that was at the helme: keepe your course away, for we shall but hinder the fisherman, and haue no fish neither, and so at my commaundement he did. But at length he at þe helme standing higher then all we did, said: Me thinke Maister, it is a man. MarginaliaGod a maruelous helper in tyme of neede.But yet they being in doubt that it was but a Fishers Boy, returned the ship from him agayne to keepe their course.

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Crow beholding the shipp to turne from him, being then in vtter dispayre, & ready now to perish with watchching, famine, and moreouer miserabllye beaten with the Seas, at last tooke his Marryners cap from his head, and holding vp the same with his arme, as high as he coulde, thought by shaking it as well as he might, to geue them some token of better sight.

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Whereupon the Styreman more sensibly perceiuing a thing to moue, aduertised vs agayne, declaring how he did see playnly a mans arme: and with that we all beheld hym well, and so came to hym, and tooke him vp. And as soone as we had had him in our ship, he began to put hys hand in his bosome: and one asked him if he had money there. No sayd he, I haue a booke here, I think it be wet: & so drew out his Testament which we then dryed. MarginaliaCrow with the Testament preserued on the Sea.But the Sea had so beaten him, þt his eyes, nose, & mouth, was almost closed with salt, that the heate of his face, and the weather had made. So we made a fire and shifted him wt dry clothes, and gaue him Aqua composita to drinke, and such meate as was in the ship, and then let him sleepe.

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The next day when we awaked him about viij. of the clocke in the morning, and his bloud began somewhat to appeare in his flesh (for whē we tooke him vp his flesh was euē as though it had bene sodden, or as a drowned mans is) and then we talked with him of all the matter before rehearsed. And so sayling to Antwerp, the Marchaunts which sawe the thing published the same in Antwerpe, & because it was wonderful, the people there both men and women came to the ship to see hym many of them, Some gaue hym a petycoate, and some a shyrt, some hosen, and some money, (alwayes noting how he cast away his money, and kept his booke.

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And many of the women wept when they heard and sawe hym. And Maister Gouernour of the English nation there, had hym before hym, and talked with hym of all the matter: and pitieng hys case commaunded the Officer of the English house to goe with hym to the free oste houses amongst the English merchaunts, and I with them, MarginaliaThe summe of his money cast into the Sea restored him agayne.and at three houses there was giuen him vj. pound x. shillyngs. And so from thence hee went with me to Roane, where the people also came to hym to see hym, meruailing at the great workes of God.

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And thus much concerning this poore man with hys new Testament preserued in the sea (which testament the Popes clergy condemneth on the land) ye haue heard as I receiued by the relation of the partie aboue named, who was the doer thereof, and yet alyue dwellyng in Lee, well knowen to all merchants of London. In which story this by the way vnderstand good Reader (which rightly may be supposed) that if this poore man thus found & preserued in the sea with a new Testament in his bosome, had had in stead of that a pixe wt a consecrated hoste about hym, no doubt it had bene rong ere this tyme, all christendom ouer for a miracle, so far as the Pope hath any land. But to let the Pope wt his false miracles go, let vs returne againe to our matter begun, & adioine another history of much lyke condition, testified likewise by the information of the sayd Tho. Morse aboue mētioned, to þe intent to make known the worthy acts of the almighty, that he may be magnified

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