Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Story

(1510? - 1571)

1st Regius Professor of Civil Law. Roman catholic martyr. (DNB)

John Story was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

In the 1563 edition, Foxe claims that Story urged that Elizabeth be executed, maintaining that it was pointless to cut the branches off a tree and not strike at its roots (1563, p. 1004). These passages were never reprinted.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked him to discover what Master G. had said to Doctor Story and others. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

Dr Story was said by Dr Martin to have been the chief procurer of the deaths of John Warren, his wife and daughter, although he was a relative of theirs. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

When John Denley sang a psalm at his burning, Story rebuked him for it. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

John Story is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

The first examination of John Philpot was by Cholmley, Master Roper and John Story and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall on 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89 , 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Story was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was sent to Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless, which referred to Story. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

A chaplain asked Thomas Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Story commanded Green be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story, when he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

At Elizabeth's accession Story was committed to ward but he managed to escape overseas, where he met with the duke of Alva in Antwerp. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend Story and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

In prison, Story refused to agree to the act of supremacy and was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor. 1583, p. 2153.

Foxe refers to his death. 1563, p. 1706.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Wiseman

(1515 - 1558)

JP. Of Felstead. Auditor of Augmentations [Bindoff, Commons]. Described as 'of Caufield' in the Commission of the Peace of May 1555 [PRO SP11/5, no. 6]

Thomas Bowyer was brought before Wiseman of Felstead, who sent him to Colchester Castle and then to Bonner. 1563, p. 1524, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1809, 1583, p. 1916.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lord Richard Rich

(1496? - 1567)

1st Baron Rich (DNB)

Richard Rich was one of the signatories to a letter, dated 9 July 1553, from the Privy Council to Princess Mary, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1658; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

He was present at Thomas Watson's Paul's cross sermon, 20 August 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey, 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Rich was one of the signatories to a letter, dated 27 November 1554, sent from the Privy Council to Bonner, informing the bishop that Mary was pregnant and ordering him to have prayers and Te Deums said throughout the diocese (1563, pp. 1014-15; 1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, pp. 1475-76).

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Master Maynard

Alderman of Colchester

Agnes George said she had been imprisoned in Colchester at the command of Master Maynard because she refused to attend church. 1563, p. 1524; 1570, p. 2096; 1576, p. 1808; 1583, p. 1915.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Gratwick

Prisoner in Newgate.

Henry Adlington went to Newgate to visit a prisoner there called Gratwick, but was apprehended and brought before John Story. 1563, p. 1524, 1570, p. 2096, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1915.

Richard Gratwick wrote a confession of faith and signed a submission agreeing to catholic teaching on the eucharist. 1570, p. 2159, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1974.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Thomas Mildmay

MP (1547, 1553, 1555, 1558, 1559); Sheriff of Essex and Herts (1558 - 1559). Older brother of Sir Walter Mildmay [Bindoff, Commons]

Sir Thomas Mildmay was one of the commissioners who examined Thomas Wattes on 26 April 1555. The commissioners sent Wattes to Bishop Bonner on 27 April to be tried for heresy. 1563, pp. 1162-63 and 1165-66; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, pp. 1594-95

John Derifall was called before Lord Rich and Master Mildmay.1563, p. 1523, 1570, p. 2096, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1914.

[Sir Thomas was described by Bishop Grindal of London in 1564 as 'indifferent in religion' (Hasler, Commons)].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Higbed

(d. 1555)

Gentleman, martyr

Thomas Higbed was denounced to Bonner and detained at Colchester together with Thomas Causton and Henry Wye. Bishop Bonner and John Feckenham came to Colchester to attempt to convert them. When these efforts failed, Causton and Higbed were transported to London. 1563, pp. 1103-4; 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

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Higbed was examined by Bonner on 17 February 1555. 1563, p. 1104; 1570, pp. 1716-17; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

He was examined by Bonner on 18 February 1555. 1563, pp. 1104 and 1108-09; 1570, p. 1717; 1576, pp. 1465-66; 1583, pp. 1539-40. [The date is given as 'xxviii Feb.' in the 1563 edition; this is probably a misprint.]

He was again examined by Bonner on 1 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1104-05; 1570, pp. 1717-18; 1576, p. 1466; 1583, p. 1540.

He was further examined by Bonner on 8 March 1555 1563, p. 1105; 1570, p. 1718; 1576, p. 1466; 1583, p. 1540.

Higbed was examined and condemned by Bonner on 9 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1105-07; 1570, pp. 1718-19; 1576, pp. 1466-68; 1583, pp. 1541-42.

Higbed was sent to Newgate and was later taken, together with William Hunter, to Brentwood. He was detained there with Hunter, before being sent to execution at nearby Horndon-on-Hill, Essex. Higbed comforted William Hunter's mother. He was executed on 26 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1107-08; 1570, pp. 1715 and 1719-20; 1576, pp. 1464 and 1468; 1583, pp. 1538 and 1542.

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[Foxe sometimes refers to him as 'Higbee'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Felsed [Felsted]
NGR: TL 675 204

A parish in the hundred of Hinckford, county of Essex. 4 miles east-south-east from Great Dunmow. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Middlesex, diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Greenstead [EastGreenstead]
NGR: TQ 394 385

A borough and parish in the hundred of East Grinstead, rape of Pevensey, county of Sussex. 19.75 miles north from Lewes, 29.5 miles south by east from London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Lewes, Diocese of Chichester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Harford (Hertford)
NGR: TL 325 128

A borough and market town, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Hertford, of which it is the chief town. 21 miles north of London, Hertford comprises the united parishes of All Saints and St John, and the liberties of Little Amwell and Brickenden within the parish of All Saints, together with the united parishes of St Andrew, St Mary and St Nicholas, all in the Archdeaconry of Huntingdon and diocese of Lincoln. The living of All Saints is a vicarage with that of St John annexed. The living of St Andrew is a rectory with the vicarages of St Mary and St Nicholas annexed.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hodsdon (Hoddesdon)
NGR: TL 366 085

A market town and chapelry, partly in the parish of Great Amwell, but chiefly in that of Broxbourne, in the hundred and county of Hertford. 17 miles north by east from London. A chapelry in the parish of Amwell, but subject to the vicarage of Broxbourne, which is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Middlesex, diocese of London.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Much Dunmowe [Great Dunmow]
NGR: TL 615 225

A parish and former market town in the hundred of Dunmow, county of Essex. 12.5 miles north-north-west from Chelmsford. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Middlesex, diocese of London, in the patronage of the Bishop of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Rettington [Rettenden]
NGR: TQ 766 981

A parish in the hundred of Chelmsford, county of Essex. 4.5 miles north-north-west from Rayleigh. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Essex, diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Shepping Ongar [Chipping Ongar]
NGR: TL 555 033

A market town and parish in the hundred of Ongar, county of Essex. 12 miles west by south from Chelmsford. The living is a discharged rectory in the Archdeaconry of Essex and diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stanford le Hoxe [Stanford le Hope]
NGR: TQ 683 822

A parish in the hundred of Barstable, county of Essex. 1.5 miles south-east by south from Horndon on the Hill. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Essex, diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Waltham Crosse

Not identified.


Waltham Cross - Herts - NGR: TL 355 004
Waltham's Cross - Essex - NGR: TL 695 305

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
White Nottle [White Notley]
NGR: TL 783 183

A parish in the hundred of Witham, county of Essex. 3.5 miles north-west from Witham. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Colchester and diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1939 [1915]

Queene Mary. The burning of xiij. Martyrs together at Stratford the Bowe.

MarginaliaAnno 1556. May.Rome, he beyng but xiiij. yeares of age, tooke an othe agaynst the same, which othe (he sayd) he intended to keepe by the grace of God.

MarginaliaAunswere to he 6. article.To the vj. they all aunswered affirmatiuely: sauyng Iohn Routh, and Wil. Halywel, who both refused to answer, because they knew not what they meant by this article. But the two women added, that they refused to bee reconciled to the fayth and religion that was then vsed in the Realme of England. And Laurence Pernam added, that he neuer refused to bee reconciled and brought to the vnitie of the catholike church of Christ.

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MarginaliaAunswere to the 7. Article.To the vij. Article they all aunswered affirmatiuely: but Wil. Halywell denied that euer he called the Masse Idolatry and abhomination. And Henry Wye affirmyng the Article to be true: yet he confessed hys infirmitye, that he went to hys parish church and receyued, before he was put in prison.

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MarginaliaTo the 8. article heir answeares.To the viij. Article, Edmund Hurst, Rafe Iackson & George Searles aunswered affirmatiuely: Henry Wye sayd he was brought before certaine Iustices of Peace in Essex, conceryng one Higbed 

Commentary  *  Close

This Thomas Higbed, the martyr, who was burned in Essex on 26 March 1555.

his late maister, and therevpon he was committed to Colchester Castell, and from thence sent to London to the Bishop to be further examined. Wil. Hallywell affirmed the like confession as Henry Wye did, onely Higbed excepted. Iohn Derifall said he was called before the Lord Rich, and Maister Mildmay of Chelmesford, and was by them sent to Boner Bish. of London, to be further by hym examined, Tho. Bowyer sayd he was brought before one M. Wiseman of Felsed, & by hym was sent to Colchester castle, and from thēce was caried to Boner bishop of London, to be by hym further examined. Lion Cawch sayd that he was sent to come before the Kyng and Queenes Maiesties Commissioners, and there before them appearyng three tymes, was sent to Boner bishop of London, to be by hym further examined. Henry Adlington sayd, that he commyng to Newgate to speake with one Gratwike there beyng prisoner for the testimony of Iesu Christ, was apprehended and brought before D. Story, and by hym sent to Boner bish. of London, to be by hym further examined. Iohn Routh sayd, that he was conuented before the Earle of Oxford, and by hym sent to the castle of Colchester: & from thence conueyed to Boner B. of London, to bee by hym further examined. Laurence Pernam sayd, that he was committed to Harford prison, because he would not go to church, and from thence sent to Boner B. of London, to be by him further examined. Agnes George sayd, that she was com-

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mitted to prison in Colchester, at the commaundement of one M. Maynard an Alderman of the towne, because she would not go to church, and from thence was sent to Boner B. of London to be by hym further examined. Elizabeth pepper sayd, she was apprehended by two Constables and an Alderman, for that shee woulde not come to church, and by them was sent to Boner B. of London, to be by hym further examined.

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MarginaliaTo the 9. article their aunsweres.To the ix. Article, they all beleued the premisses to bee true, aboue by them confessed, and that they were of the dioces and iurisdiction of London. But Elizabeth Pepper added that she was of the towne of Colchester.

And Agnes George added that she was of the Parish of Barefold. 

Commentary  *  Close

Berechurch, Colchester.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 153, fn 1

Query Bardfield (Great and Little). - ED.

And Lyon Cawche added that he was then of the Citie of London, by reason that he was at that present a merchant there.

MarginaliaHenry Wye.Henry Wye Brewer, was of the parish of Stantford le Hoxe, and of 32. yeres of age.

MarginaliaW. Halliwell.William Hallywell was a Smith of the Parishe of Waltham Holle crosse, and of the age of 24. yeres or theraboutes.

MarginaliaRafe Iackson.Rafe Iackson was a seruingman of Shepping Onger, and of the age of 24. yeares.

MarginaliaLaurence Pernam.Laurence Parnam was a Smith of Hodsdon, within the parish of Amwell, in the County of Hartford, & of the age of 22. yeres.

MarginaliaIohn Derifall.Iohn Derifall was a Labourer of the parish of Rettington in Essex, and of the age of 50. yeres.

MarginaliaEdmund Hurst.Edmund Hurst was a Labourer of the parish of S. Iames in Colchester, and of the age of fiftye yeares and aboue.

MarginaliaThomas Bowyer.Thomas Bowyer was a Weauer of Much Dunnemow, and of the age of 36. yeares.

MarginaliaGeorge Searles.George Searles was a Tailor betwene 20. & 21. yeres of age, of the parish of White Nottle, where he was taken and caried to the Lord Rich, who sent hym to Colchester castle, with a commaundement that no friend he had shuld speake with hym. There he lay 6. weekes, and was sent vp to London, where he was sometyme in the Bishops colehouse, sometyme in Lollards Tower, and last of all in Newgate. He was apprehēded in Lent about a fortnight before Easter in the place aforesayd.

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MarginaliaLion Cauch.Lyon Cawch was a Broker borne in Flaunders, and then resident at his taking in the citie of London, & of the age of 28. yeares, or thereaboutes.

MarginaliaHenry Adlington.Henry Adlington was a Sawyer, and of Greenested in the county of Sussex, and of the age of 30. yeares.

The burnyng of xiij. persones at Stratford the Bowe neare London, whereof the two women went in among them to the stake vntyed.

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Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
The largest multiple burning to be depicted was of a group of individuals nearly all of whom came from Essex, the county preeminent for its godliness in Foxe's estimation. The thirteen are accurately represented, with the men in groups of four and three bound to the three stakes, and the two women shown unattached as described. It is an unusually animated scene, which the tree and embanked enclosure indicate as taking place in a rural setting. At the back and sides people peer over the surrounding bank and two men on the right seem about to throw themselves towards the outstretched hands of those already chained to the stake, surrounded by the towering pile of faggots. In front the two women joining the men are saying last farewells in the face of the pikeman. There is a sense of hubbub, with the onlookers of both sexes praying and reaching towards the unlit pyre. The two married women, aged 26 and about 30 (the latter reportedly pregnant) are shown making their way into the pile of faggots, seemingly an extrapolation from the statement that when the men were bound to the stakes they were 'loose in the midst without any stake'. The illustrator seems to have tried to show something of the age differential of the group (three of whom were 50 and the rest in their twenties or thirties): the face of the man praying (front right, above attendant putting on fuel) is distinctly lined and careworn as compared with those behind him.

Iohn
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