Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes Wardall

(d. 1556)

Wife of Robert Wardall. Of Ipswich.

Agnes Wardall was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Agnes Wardall was kept abroad from her home for fear of persecution. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

She returned home and learned of Argentine's knowledge of her whereabouts from her maid. Argentine and Butler made a search for her in her house. 1570, pp. 2124-25, 1576, pp. 1846-47, 1583, pp. 1940-41.

Wardall escaped into the fields and hid in a ditch. George Manning discovered where she was and gave her a warning to be still so that his co-searcher, John Bate, did not find her. She remained still and escaped thanks to Manning. 1570, pp. 2124-25, 1576, pp. 1846-47, 1583, pp. 1940-41.

 
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John Steward

John Steward, of Ipswich, was a persecutor of protestants. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

A complaint was made by Williams, Steward and Butler about protestants in Ipswich on 18 May 1556. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler accused 22 parishioners in Ipswich of not taking the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

A complaint was made against several parishioners in Ipswich by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

[Alias Footman]

 
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Matthew Butler

Apothecary. Constable of Ipswich.

Matthew Butler was a persecutor of protestants. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

He is also described as a curious singing man and a fine organist. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

One night when he was on watch at Cornhill, Argentine came to him with news of Agnes Wardall's return to Ipswich. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

Butler and Argentine conspired against Agnes Wardall. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

A complaint was made by Williams, Steward and Butler about protestants in Ipswich on 18 May 1556. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler accused 22 parishioners in Ipswich of not taking the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

A complaint was made against several parishioners in Ipswich by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Philip Ulmes [or Williams]

(fl. 1519 - 1558)

Wealthy merchant of Ipswich. Chamerlain of Ipswich (1550 - 1551). Treasurerr of Ipswich (1557 - 1558). MP for Ipswich 1558. (Bindoff).

Philip Ulmes of Ipswich was a persecutor of protestants. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

A complaint was made by Williams, Steward and Butler about protestants in Ipswich on 18 May 1556. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler accused 22 parishioners in Ipswich of not taking the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

A complaint was made against several parishioners in Ipswich by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

[Alias Footman]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Argentine

(d. 1568)

Doctor of Physic. Persecutor of Protestants. Rector of St Helen with St Clement, Ipswich (1556 - 1568) [DNB]

One night when Matthew Butler was on watch at Cornhill, Argentine came to him with news of Agnes Wardall's return to Ipswich. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

John Butler and Argentine conspired against Agnes Wardall. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

Foxe recounts Argentine's early days in Ipswich under Henry VIII and Edward VI. 1570, p. 2125, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1941.

He was made a priest after the death of his wife. 1570, p. 2125, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1941.

He persecuted protestants under Mary. Late in Mary's reign he moved to London, where he returned to protestantism. 1570, p. 2125, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1941.

[Alias Sexten.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Wardall

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich.

Robert Wardall's wife Agnes was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Wardall had a stumped foot. He was forced into becoming a sailor because of persecution. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

He fled Ipswich for fear of persecution.1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Son of Agnes Wardall the elder. Husband of Ages Wardall.]

1964 [1940]

Q. Mary. Palmer, Gwin, Askine, Martyrs. The story of Agnes Wardall.

MarginaliaAnno 1556. Iuly.Palmer. Alter the Epithetons, and I will subscribe.

Ieffrey. Subscribe and qualifie the matter with thine own pen. So he subscribed. MarginaliaThe Popish Sentence read against Palmer.Whereupon D. Ieffrey proceded to read the Popish sentence of his cruell condemnation, and so was he deliuered to the charge of the secular power, & was burned the same day in the after noone, about fiue of the clocke.

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Within one houre before they went to the place of execution, Palmer in the presence of many people, MarginaliaPalmer comforteth his two fellowe Martyrs going to theyr death.comforted his fellowes with these wordes. Brethren (sayth he) be of good chere in the Lord and faint not. Remember þe words of our Sauiour Christ, where he sayth: Happy are you whē men reuile you and persecute you for righteousnesse sake. Reioyce and be glad, for great is your reward in heauen. Feare not them that kill the body, and be not able to touch the soule. God is faythfull, and will not suffer vs to be tempted further, then we shall be able to beare it. Wee shall not ende our lyues in the fire, but make a change for a better lyfe. Yea for coales, we shall receiue pearles. For Gods holy spirite certifieth our spirit, that he hath euen now prepared for vs a sweet supper in heauen for his sake which suffered first for vs.

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With these and such lyke wordes, he did not only comfort the hartes of his sillie brethren that were with hym appoynted as sheepe to be slaine, but also wrested out plētifull teares from the eyes of many that heard him. And as they were singyng a Psalme, came the shiriffe Sir Richard Abridges, and the Bailiffes of the Towne, wyth a great company of harnessed and weaponed men to conduct them to the fire. MarginaliaPalmer, Gwin, Askine, brought to the place of slaughter.When they were come to the place where they should suffer, they fell all three to the ground, and Palmer with an audible voyce pronounced the xxxj. Psalme, but the other two made their prayers secretly to almighty God.

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And as Palmer began to arise, there came behind him two popish priests, exhortyng him yet to recant and saue his soule. Palmer answered and sayd: MarginaliaThe words of Palmer to the Popish Priests.Away, away, tempt me no longer. Away I say from me all ye that worke iniquitie, for the Lord hath heard the voice of my teares. And so forthwith they put of their raiment, and went to þe stake and kissed it. And when they were bound to the post, Palmer sayd: Good people pray for vs, that we may perseuer to the ende. And for Christes sake, beware of Popish teachers, for they deceiue you.

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As he spake this, a seruant of one of the Bailifs, threw a fagot at his face, that the bloud gushed out in diuers places. For the which fact, the Shiriffe reuiled hym, callyng hym cruell tormentor, and with hys walkyng staffe  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 218, line 17 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'walkyng staffe' in the text to 'goyng-staff'.} The Edition of 1570 (p. 2123) has altered goyng-staffe into "walking-staff." Jewel, however, makes use of it: "So Nazianzen saith xxx, going by a staff as old men used to do." (Defense of Apol. pt. vi. p. 912, edit. P. S., orvol. vi. p. 230, ed. Oxford.)

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brake hys hed, that the bloud likewyse ran about his eares. Whē the fire was kindled and began to take holde vppon their bodies, they lift their hands towards heauen, and quietly and cheerefully as though they had felt no smart, they cried: MarginaliaThe words of these Martyrs at their death.Lord Iesu strength vs, Lord Iesu assist vs, Lord Iesu receiue our soules. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of the three godly Saintes.And so they continued without any

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woodcut [View a larger version]

Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
A confusing reuse of a woodcut which has no heading and does not tally with the sidenote. It is placed in the account of Julins Palmer who is illustrated with another reused cut in 1570, p. 2124 (see below). The burnyng of Iulius Palmer, Martyr at Newbury Small cut (a) 1570, p. 2124. Julius, or Julins Palmer (Foxe used variants of his name) was only illustrated in 1570, and then with a small cut of repeating use (see Thomas Tomkyns). Julius Palmer was a fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, which made his case of special interest to Foxe, who gained additional information about Palmer after his initial entry. These facts might have had some bearing on the illustration being limited to the second edition.

struglyng, holding vp their handes, and knockyng their hartes, and calling vpon Iesu vntill they had ended their mortall lyues.

MarginaliaA notable spectacle in the Martyrdome of Iulins Palmer.Among other thyngs this is also to be noted, that after their three heds by force of the ragyng and deuouryng flames of fire were fallen together in a plumpe  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 218, line 7 from the bottom

Late editions of Foxe corrupt this into "lump;" but those of 1576 and 1597 (p. 1760) read as now given. It means a "group or mass of anything," see Halliwell's Dict. of Archaic words, and Nares's Glos. As used by Foxe, its meaning seems rather to differ from that in the instances adduced by Nares.

or cluster, which was meruailous to behold, and that they all were iudged already to haue geuen vp the ghost, sodainly Palmer, as a man waked out of sleep, mooued his tongue and iawes, and was heard to pronounce this word Iesu. So beyng resolued into ashes, he yelded to God as ioyfull a soule (confirmed with the sweete promises of Christ) as any one that euer was called beside to suffer for his blessed name. God graunt vs all to be mooued with the lyke spirite, workyng in our hartes constantly to stand in defence and confession of Christes holy Gospell, to the ende, Amen.

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¶ De Martyrio Palmeri hexasticon. MarginaliaEpitaphium in Palmerum.


Palmerus flammas Christi pro dogmate passus,
Impositum pondus, ceu bona palma tulit.
Non retrocessit, sed contra audentior iuit,
Illæsam retinens, fortis in igne fidem.
Propterea in cœlum nunc Palmifer iste receptus,
Iusticiæ Palmam non pereuntis habet.

Iustus vt Palma florebit.

¶ A memorable storie of one Agnes Wardall in the Towne of Ipswich, pursued for the true fayth of Christes Gospell. 
Commentary  *  Close
Agnes Wardall

This entire account was first introduced in the 1570 edition and was unchanged in subsequent editions. As Foxe reveals in a marginal note, at the end of this story, Foxe reveals that the source for this account was Peter Moon, whose account of his own ordeals follows this one.

MarginaliaIuly. A notable story of Agnes Wardall of Ipswich.ABout the sayd moneth of Iuly, in this present yere, 1556. there was one Rich. Argentine D. of Phisike, otherwise called Rich. Sexten, with certaine other dwellyng in the Towne of Ipswich, not many in number, but in heart and purpose mightily bent to impugne & impeach the growyng of Christes Gospell, & the fauourers of the same. MarginaliaD. Argentine Schoolemaster, Wat. Butler Constable, Phil. Vlmes, Edm. Leach, Iohn Steward, persecutors.In the number of whome were Phillip Vlmes, Edmond Leach, Iohn Steward, and Mathew Butler Apothecarie, 

Commentary  *  Close

Phillip Ulmes is almost certainly Phillip Williams. In 1556, Williams, Steward and Butler sent a petition to the royal commissioners, denouncing protestants in Ipswich and urging that they be prosecuted (1576, p. 1981; 1583, pp. 2089-90).

a curious singyng man, a fine player of the Organes, a perfect papist, and a diligent promooter of good men.  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 219, line 20

It may be remarked here, to avoid apparent inconsistency, that by "promoter" in this case is meant "an informer:" see Nares's Glossary in voc.

This Butler beyng then Constable in the Towne of Ipswich, as he was in his watch by night vppon Cornehill, commeth to hym Doct. Argentine in great hast, geuyng hym intelligence of one Agnes Wardall, beyng thē lately come home to her house in Ipswich. Wherupon immediately, such a way was contriued betweene them, that the sayd Agnes Wardall forthwith should bee apprehended: but God in whose prouidence the direction of all thynges consisteth, by whose disposition they haue their operation, so graciously prouided for his seruaunt, & so preuented their malignaunt deuises, that they came to no great effect in workyng, although on the contrary part there wanted no good will, as here consequently you shall further vnderstand.

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This Agnes Wardall was a womā that liued in gods feare, 

Commentary  *  Close

Agnes Wardall was a member of the parish of St Clement's in Ipswich which contained a striking number of protestants (see 1576, p. 1981; 1583, p. 2090). Richard Agentine was the rector of St Clement's, so he would certainly have known the Wardalls and his persecution of them may well have been personal.

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and was at defiance with their Romish trash, desiring rather with hard fare and euill lodging to be abroad, then to be at home in her house, and among the tentes of the vngodly: her husband  
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For Agnes's husband, Robert Wardall, see 1576, p. 1981 and 1583, p. 2090).

also beyng a man liuyng in the feare of God, and for the testimony of his conscience being also hunted, by force of the law was constrained to auoyd his house, MarginaliaRobert Wardall driuen by persecution to serue in a shippe.and got into a Crare 
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A small trading vessel.

with an honest man, seruyng as a sailer, a facultie not before of hym frequented, nor he a man nimble for that trade, because God had geuen hym an impediment by reason of a stumped foote, vnfit to climbe to top and yard: yet so it pleased God to enable hym with his strength, that he was strong and lustie to doe good seruice, as they can well witnesse that were of his company.

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The sayd Agnes Wardall chaunced on a day to come home to see her poore house and children, which was vnder the guiding of a yong maid, and beyng espied, newes was borne to Doct. Argentine, who hauyng knowledge thereof as is aforesayd, went spedily vnto the Apothecary 

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I.e., Matthew Butler.

the Constable aforesayd, and informed hym what a notable cure was to bee brought on Wardals wyfe in the apprehendyng of her. MarginaliaAgnes Wardall persecuted by D. Argentine and his mates.Which was more lyke to speede then misse, had not the mighty prouidence of God wrought cōtrary to their expectation.

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This beyng known to the Constable, the watch was charged spedily, and ech company sent to his place. And Argentine and Butler tooke vnto them a good number, & forth they go vnto the house of this poore woman to laye hands vpon her, and beset the house on the foreside & back side, lying open in the fieldes, and other some were set to

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