Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anne Moone

Wife of Peter Moone.

When Anne Moone appeared before Hopton, he told her husband that her looks were deceptive and that he would rather she would commit adultery with twenty men than disobey the queen and the pope's ordinance. She defied his words. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

When her husband relented, she did too. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

She was allowed to depart to suckle her daughter. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Anne Moone felt troubled at her denial. As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moore and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Hopton and Dunning left without reexamining Anne and Peter Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

 
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John Hopton

(d. 1558)

Bishop of Norwich (1554 - 1558) [DNB]

John Hopton was created bishop of Norwich (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton to be made to recant or to be tried for heresy (1583, p. 1577).

Hopton was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death. 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton, either to be forced to recant, or to be tried for heresy. 1583, p. 1577.

James Abbes was caught and appeared before Dr Hopton. He recanted but when the bishop gave him 40 or 20 pence [Foxe is not sure] he recanted. He was burned in Bury on 2 August 1555. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, pp. 1864-65, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1683.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

William Allen was examined and condemned by the bishop of Norwich. 1570, p. 1883, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Roger Coo was examined by the bishop of Norwich, 12 August, 1555. 1563, pp. 1272-73, 1570, pp. 1883-84, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole were condemned by John Hopton and Dunning and handed over to Sir John Silliard, high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk. 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Roger Bernard was examined and condemned by Hopton. Adam Foster was sent to the Eye prison and then to Norwich to be examined and then condemned by Hopton. 1563, pp. 1527-28, 1570, pp. 2098-99, 1576, pp. 1810-11, 1583, p. 1917.

The second, third and fourth examinations of John Fortune were conducted by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2100-01, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, pp. 1918-19.

Peter and Anne Moone were presented before Hopton (bishop of Norwich) and Dunning (chancellor) during their visitation of Ipswich in 1556. Three articles were presented against Peter Moone and his answers given. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Simon Miller was imprisoned in the bishop's house. He was condemned by Hopton and his chancellor, Michael Dunning. 1563, pp. 1602-03, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

The second examination of Thomas Spurdance was by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2221-22, 1576, pp. 1917-18, 1583, pp. 2024-25.

John Fortune's second and third examinations were conducted by the bishop of Norwich, who condemned him. 1563, pp. 1636-38.

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Carman was examined and condemned by Hopton.1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Alexander Lane was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Robert Miles was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Rose's second examination was before Hopton, W. Woodhouse, Dr Barret and others1570, p. 1978, 1576, pp. 1978-79, 1583, p. 2084.

Thomas Rose's last appearance was before Woodhouse and Hopton. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1980-81, 1583, pp. 2085-86.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

John Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

John Hopton died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

[1563, p. 1707, correctly states that Hopton died before Queen Mary. He died in August 1558.]

 
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Michael Dunning

Chancellor of Norwich (1554 - 1558?) [Fasti; DCL, 1555; Venn]

Michael Dunning is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Dunning made a visitation to Ipswich in 1556. He examined Peter and Anne Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

He interrupted the examination of Peter Moone and his wife to tell Hopton that several prisoners (whom he described as 'heretics and Anabaptists') had been brought from Boxford, Lavenham, and the cloth country.1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Edmund Poole was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Hopton and Dunning left Ipswich without reexamining Anne and Peter Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

After Thomas Spicer was examined and condemned by Dunning he was handed over to Sir John Silliard. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

John Denny was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

A papist brought Simon Miller before Dunning, who spoke with him and then committed him to ward. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

During his examination, Miller's confession was discovered hidden in his shoe. Miller reaffirmed his confession before Dunning. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Crashfield was first examined by Dunning. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Crashfield was again examined by Dunning and Brydges, at which time he was asked to speak with Dr Pore. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2205, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

Crashfield was condemned by Dunning. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

On 23 July 1557 Cicely Ormes was called before Dunning and Brydges, at which time she was condemned. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Ormes wrote to Dunning about her recantation. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Thomas Spurdance was examined before Michael Dunning, chancellor of Norwich. 1563, pp. 1634-36, 1570, pp. 2220-21, 1576, pp. 1916-17, 1583, p. 2024.

Michael Dunning died in Lincolnshire while sitting in a chair. . 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Peter Moone

(d. 1601) (DNB

See J. Webb, 'Peter Moone of Ipswich [d. 1601]. A Tudor Tailor, Poet and Gospeller and his Circle,' Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History, 38 (1993).

Author of STC 18055-6 and 20661-3.

See also A. G. Dickens, Notes and Queries (1954), p. 513.

Presented before Hopton (bishop of Norwich) and Dunning (chancellor) during their visitation of Ipswich in 1556. Three articles were presented against him and his answers given. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

After questioning by Hopton, he relented. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Moone felt troubled because of his denial. He contemplated suicide. As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Hopton and Dunning left without reexamining Moone and his wife. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Moone was the source for the story of Agnes Wardall. 1570, pp. 2124-25, 1576, pp. 1846-47, 1583, pp. 1940-41.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Smart

(by 1507 - 1560)

Of Ipswich. MP for Ipswich (1545, 1555). Bailiff (1547 - 1548, 1551 - 1552, 1558 - 1559), JP (1547 - 1548, 1551 - 1553, 1554 - 1555, 1557 - 1560). (Bindoff)

Smart was Foxe's source for the account of Peter Moone and Agnes Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Smart denounced Agnes Moone to Hopton. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Sir Henry Doyle, the sheriff of Ipswich, was offended by Driver's and Gouch's psalm singing at their execution. He asked the bailiffs to ask them to be silent. Richard Smart, one of the bailiffs, bade them do so to no avail. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

 
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Boxford
NGR: SU 424 714

A parish in the hundred of Faircross, county of Berks. 4.5 miles north-west by north from Newbury. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Berks, diocese of Salisbury.

There is also a Boxford in Suffolk, [TL 959 408] but this is more likely in context.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Lanham [Langham]
NGR: TL 980 690

A parish in the hundred of Blackbourn, county of Suffolk. 3.5 miles east by south from Ixworth. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1966 [1942]

Queene Mary. The trouble and persecution of Peter Moone and his wyfe.
MarginaliaAnno 1556. Iuly.¶ The trouble of Peter Moone and his Wife, and of other Godly Protestantes at Byshop Hoptons visitation in Ipswich. 
Commentary  *  Close
Peter Moon

This account was introduced in the 1570 edition and was unchanged in subsequent editions. As Foxe records in a marginal note, his source for this account was Peter Moon himself. Peter Moon was the author of a number of protestant polemical works written at the outset of Edward VI's reign: A short treatyse of certayne thinges abused in the popish church (Ipswich: 1548), STC 18055; A plaister for a galled horse (London, 1548), STC 20622 and A corosyfe to be layd harde unto the hartes of all faythfull professors of Christes gospels (London: 1548?), STC 20661. On Moon see J. Webb, 'Peter Moone of Ipswich (d. 1601). A Tudor Poet and Gospeller and his Circle,' Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History, 38 (1993), pp. 35-55.

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IN the yeare of our Lord God. 1556. The sceane or visitation, being kept before Whitsontide, in the Towne of Ipswich in Suffolcke, by Doctour Hopton being then Byshop of Norwich, and Myles Dunninges, being then his Cauncellour, diuers and sondry godly Protestantes, through the accusation of euill men, where sore troubled & presented before him: MarginaliaPeter Moone accused to B. Hopton.among whom were accused one Peter Moone a Taylor, and Anne his wife: for theyr disobedience to the law, in not shewing theyr readinesse to come to the Church, and to be partaker of such Romish obseruances as at that time were vsed. 

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There was more to Moon's arrest than this. Along with John Ramsey (see 1576, p. 1981; 1583, p. 2090), Christopher Goodman and William West, Moon had been sent to the Tower in the summer of 1554 for leading a conspiracy against Mary (APC V, pp. 65 and 70 as well as Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Mary I, 1553-58, ed. C. S. Knighton [London: 1998], p. 358). Moon was released on a bond of £200 and a promise to confess publicly his offense in his parish church. Moon must have already been regarded with considerable suspicion by the authorities.

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And first the sayd Peter Moone was commaunded to come before the Bishop, Marginalia3. Articles obiected to Peter Moone.where he was examined of three sondry Articles, to wit: 1. Whether the pope was supreme head: 2. Whether King Philip and Queene Mary were right inheritors to the crowne. 3. And whether in the Sacrament of the aulter was the very body of Christ substācially and really there present.

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MarginaliaPeter Moone graunteth to the Bishops articles thorough infirmitye.Vnto the which, the sayde Peter being timerous and weake, fearing more the face of man then the heauy wrath of God, affirmed, and in maner graunted vnto the demaūdes. Whereupon the Bishop being in good hope, that although he had not come to the Church, nor receiued theyr Sacrament of the Aultar, nor bene ready to doe his duetye as the law had commaunded: yet there shewing his mind sayd, that he liked well the man: for such as haue bene (sayd he) earnest in euill thinges, will also be earnest in that that is good and godly, if once they be wonne.

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Thus as this Spirituall father was commending his carnall child, and rather preferring him to hell fire, thē vnto the sincere word and commaundementes of GOD, it chaunced amongest many others in the chamber, was one of the portmen of the same towne named MarginaliaCommendation of Smart of Ipswich.Smart,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 223, line 31

For "Smart" the Editions of 1570, 1576 read "Sharpe," both in the text and in the margin.

 
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Richard Smart, a baliff of Ipswich and an MP, will be mentioned again by Foxe as having interrupted the prayers of the martyr Alexander Gouch at the stake.

an earnest member of theyr Romish law, doing of a very conscience that he did, who after the death of Queene Mary lyued not many yeares, MarginaliaRich. Smart of Ipswich repenteth his Popery at his death.but rendred his life in godly repentaunce, protesting that if God should suffer him to liue, he woulde neuer be the man he had bene before, what lawes so euer should come agayne: so that before the time of hys sicknes he frequenting earnestly the Sermons in the same Towne by diuers godly learned, woulde weepe as it had bene a childe, being notwithstanding of courage as stout a manne as any was in Ipswich. Such is the maruellous mercy of God, in calling to his kingdome, whom, & when he pleaseth.

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This portman aforesayd, perceiuing the Bishop thus, as it were, at an end with the sayd Moone, and so he lyke to be discharged, sayd vnto the Bishop: MarginaliaSmart accuseth Moones wyfe.my Lord, in deed I haue a good hope in the man, and that he will be conformable: but my Lord, he hath a perrillous woman to his wife. For I will tell you my Lorde, she neuer came to Churche yet, since the Queenes reigne, except it were at Euensong, or when shee was Churched. And not then vntill Masse were done. Wherfore your good Lordship might do a good deed to cause her to come before you, and to see if ye coulde do any good. And therefore I beseech your good Lordshyp to commaund him to pray her to come before your Lordshippe.

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At the which words Moone was somewhat styrred in that he sayde, commaunde him to pray her to come before your Lordship. And he sayd vnto him, vnder my Lordes correction I speake, I am as able to cōmaund her to come before my Lorde, as ye are to commaund the worst boy in your house. Yea my Lord, sayd the other, I cry your Lordship mercy: I haue informed your Lordship with an vntroth, if this be so. But if he be so able as he saith, he might haue commaunded her to haue come to Church in all thys time, if it had pleased him. MarginaliaPeter Moone commaunded to bring his wyfe before the Bishop.Well sayde the Bishop, looke ye come before me agayne at afternoone, and bring your wife with you: I will talke with her.

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As my Lordes dinner at that time was seruing vppe, Moone departed and taryed not to take parte thereof hauing such an hard breakefast geuen him before to digest. At afternoone Moone delayed and wayted his time, bethinking whē he might most conueniently come, especially whē his accuser & his wiues shoulde not haue bene there. And accordinge to the commaundement came with his wife, which was not so secretly, but his accuser had knowledge thereof, and came with all expedition in such poste speede, that in a maner he was windlesse entring into the bishops chamber.

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The Bishoppe hearing that Moone and his wife were

come, MarginaliaMoone and his wyfe brought before the Bishop.called for them, and sayd to Moone: is this your wife Moone? Yea my Lord, sayd he. O good Lord (sayd the Bishop) how a man may be deceiued in a woman. I promise you a man would take her for as honest a woman, by all outward appearaunce, as can be. Why my Lorde, sayde Moones wife, I trust there is none that can charge me wt any dishonesty, as cōcerning my body, I defy all þe worlde in that respect.

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Nay (quoth the Bishop) I meane not as concerning the dishonesty of thy bodye: MarginaliaB. Hopton preferreth 20. men committing adultery, before one woman transgressing The Popes ordinaunces.but thou hadst bene better to haue geuen the vse of thy body vnto xx. sundry men, thē to doe as thou hast done. For thou hast done as much as in thee lyeth, to plucke the King and the Queenes maiesties out of theyr royal seates, through thy disobedience, in shewing thy selfe an open enemy vnto Gods lawes, & theyr proceedinges.

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Then began the Bishop to examine the said Moone agayne, with the aforesayd Articles, and his wife also. And hearing her husband relēt, did also affirme the same, whiche turned vnto either of them no small trouble of minde afterwarde, but yet neither were they like thus to escape, but that in the meane time Dunning the Bishops Chaūcellour came vp in great haste, and brought newes to the Bishop, that there were such a number of hereticks come, of which some came from Boxford, some from Lauham, & about from the Cloth Country, that it would make a man out of his wittes to heare them, and there are amōg them both heretickes and Anabaptistes, sayd he. And thus Doctour Dunning with his blostering wordes interrupting Moones examination, went downe agayne as the deuill had driuen him, to keepe his styrre among them, & to take order what should be done with them.

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The Bishop beginning to bewaile the stateof the coūtrey, in that it was so infected with such a number of heretickes and rehearsing partlye theyr opinions to these that were at that time in the chāber, Moones wife had a young childe, whiche shee her selfe nursed, and the childe beyng brought into the yeard vnder the Bishops chamber cried, so that she heard it, and then sayde: My Lorde, I trust ye haue done with me. My childe cryeth beneath, I must goe geue my childe sucke, with such like wordes. MarginaliaMoones childe a parte of Gods prouidence in their deliuerance from further trouble.And the Byshop being, as it were, out of minde to talke with them any more, sayd: goe your way, I will talke with you in the morning: looke ye be here agayn in the morning: with this they both departed.

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And beneath the stone Hall of the same house, the Chauncellour Dunning being very busy about his bloudy busines, espyed Moone and his wife comming, & must needes passe by the place where he stood, and sayde: Nay soft, I must talke with you both: for ye are as euill as any that are here to day. To whom Moones wife aunswered: My Lorde hath had vs in examination, and therefore yee shall haue nought to doe with vs. Nay, quoth he, ye shall not so escape, I must talk with you also. Vnto whō Moon answered: MarginaliaMoones aunswere to the Bishops Chaūcellour.In the presence of the more, the lesse hath no power: My Lord hath taken order with vs, and therfore we are as his Lordship hath appoynted, and must repayre before him agayne to morow. MarginaliaMoone and his wyfe escaped from the Bishop and his Chauncellour.At the which he let them go, al though he was earnestly procured by the party aboue specified, to haue shewed his quality, which was nothing els but tyranny.

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So departed Moone and his wife without hurt of body: but afterward when they with Peter the Apostle beheld the face of Christ, MarginaliaMoone and his wyfe confounded in conscience for their denyall.they were sore wounded in consciences, ashamed of theyr doings, and also at the doore of desperation. In so muche, that when the sayde Moone came home to his house, & entring into a parlour alone by himselfe, considering his estate, and saw where a sword of hys did hang agaynst a wall, was earnestlye allured by the enemy Sathan to haue taken it downe, MarginaliaMoone seeketh to kill himselfe, but by Gods mercifull prouidence was preserued.and there with to haue slayne himselfe: but God, who casteth not away the penitent sinner repenting his fall with hart, defended hys vnworthy seruaunt from that temptation, and hath (I trust) left him to the amendement of life by the assistaunce of his holy spirit and to make him one amōg the elect that shalbe saued.

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The morow they both remayned and kept house with no small griefe of conscience wayting and looking wyth feare, when to be sent for to the Bishop, rather then offering theyr diligence to keepe the Bishops appoyntment, but God so wrought, that when the time drew neare that they feared calling forth, MarginaliaGods prouidence in sending away the Bishop.the bels rong for the bishops departure out of the towne. 

Commentary  *  Close

Bishop Hopton seems to have left Ipswich in considerable haste. Was he troubled by the resistance he encountered during his visitation?

For the which they were not only glad, but also many a good hart in Ipswich reioised and gaue thankes to God. God for his mercy graunt, that our sinne neuer deserue to prouoke Gods ire, that the lyke dayes come agayne. And if it so do, God make then, with all other weakelinges, stronge and worthy souldiours to

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