Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Collas de Loutre

Of St Peter's Port, Guernsey.

Collas de Loutre was a woman who went with Vincent Gosset to retrieve a stolen cup from Perotine Massey. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

 
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Guillemine Guilbert

(d. 1556)

Sister of Perotine Massey and daughter of Katherine Cauches. Martyr. Of S Pierre Port, Guernsey. [Ogier, pp. 57 - 58]

Guillemine Gilbert was imprisoned with her sister and mother because of the stolen cup brought to their house by Vincent Gosset. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

She was burned at the stake with her sister and mother. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2129, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1945.

 
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Jaques Amy

(died after 1576)

Dean of Guernsey (deprived in 1558), curé of St Saviour, Guernsey (1547 - 1572). [D. M. Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1996), p. .69, 75.]

Jaques Amy examined and condemned Perotine Massey, Katherine Cauches and Guillemine Gilbert. 1563, pp. 1542-43, 1570, pp. 2127-28, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

He was later forced to beg pardon for his involvement in the deaths of Perotine Massey, Katherine Cauches and Guillemine Gilbert. He was imprisoned and disposessed of his livings. 1563, pp. 1544-45, 1570, pp. 2130-31, 1576, pp. 1851-52, 1583, pp. 1945-46.

 
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Katherine Cauches

(d. 1556)

Of S Pierre Port, Guernsey. [Ogier, pp. 57-58]

Mother of Perontine Massey and Guillemine Gilbert. Martyr.

Katherine Cauches was imprisoned with her two daughters because of the stolen cup brought to their house by Vincent Gosset. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

She was burned at the stake with her two daughters on 18 July 1556. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2129, 1576, p. 1851, 1583, p. 1945.

[Foxe spells her name 'Cawches'.]

 
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Massey

(1556 - 1556)

Baby son of Perotine Massey. Of St Peter's Port, Guernsey.

[Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1996), pp. 53, 57.]

He was born in the flames as his mother was dying. He was saved by W. House but thrust back into the flames at the insistence of Helier Gosselin, the bailiff. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2128, 1576, p. 1851, 1583, p. 1945.

 
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Nicholas Cary ('the Elder')

Constable of S Pierre Port, Guernsey, and jurat. [Ogier, p. 69]

Nicholas Cary informed the king's justices of a theft on the island. He assembled the justices to examine Vincent Gosset, the perpetrator. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

He reported that he found the stolen cup in the house of Perotine Massey. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

He took part in the examination and condemnation of Perotine Massey, Katherine Cauches and Guillemine Gilbert. 1563, pp. 1542-43, 1570, pp. 2127-28, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

He was later forced to beg pardon for his involvement in the deaths of Perotine Massey, Katherine Cauches and Guillemine Gilbert. 1570, pp. 2130-31, 1576, pp. 1851-52, 1583, pp. 1945-46.

 
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Nicholas le Conronney

Gentleman. Of S Pierre Port, Guernsey.

On 27 May 1556 Vincent Gosset went to the house of Nicholas le Conronney at around 10pm. and stole a silver cup. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

Perotine Massey told Conronney about the stolen cup. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

[Referred to as 'Collas Conron' in 1563 throughout.]

 
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Perotine Massey

(d. 1556)

Daughter of Katherine Cauches. Martyr. Of S Pierre Port, Guernsey.

[Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1996), pp. 57-58.]

Perotine Massey lived with her mother, Katherine Cauches, and her sister, Guillemine Gilbert. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

Vincent Gosset took a stolen silver cup to her in the hope of receiving money from her against it. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

Thomas Effart testified that Massey informed the cup's owner, Nicholas le Conronney, of the cup's theft and Gosset was then apprehended. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

Massey was imprisoned with her sister and mother because of the stolen cup brought to their house by Vincent Gosset. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

Massey was found not guilty of theft but retained for not going to church. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

Her case was put before Jaques Amy, the dean of Guernsey. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

A letter was sent from the Helier Gosselin (bailiff), lieutenant and jurats of S Pierre Port to Jaques Amy regarding the three accused women. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127-28, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

Foxe states that on 14 July 1556 Perotine Massey was examined before Hellier Gosselin, in the presence of Richard Devike, Pierre Martin, Nicholas Cary, John Blundel, Nicholas de Lisle, John Le Marchant, John le Fevre, Pierre Bonamy, Nicholas Martin, John de la March (jurats), and Jaques Amy. 1563, p. 1543, 1570, p. 2128, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, pp. 1943-44.

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She was condemned as a heretic on 17 or 27 of July 1556. 1563, p. 1543, 1570, p. 2128, 1576, p. 1850, 1583, p. 1944.

She was first strangled but the rope broke. She gave birth in the flames. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2128, 1576, p. 1851, 1583, p. 1945.

Her child was initially saved by W. House but the bailiff insisted that the baby boy be thrust back into the flames. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2128, 1576, p. 1851, 1583, p. 1945.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Effart

(d. 1580)

Jurat (1558 - 1580). Of S Pierre Port, Guernsey. [Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1996), p. 57.]

Thomas Effart testified that Perotine Massey informed Nicholas le Conronney that Vincent Gosset had come to her with a silver cup stolen from Conronney's house. 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

He begged pardon for the jurats and Dean, Jaques Amy, as well as all the inhabitants of Guernsey for the actions taken against Massey, Gilbert and Cauches. 1570, pp. 2130-31, 1576, pp. 1851-52, 1583, pp. 1945-46.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Vincent Gosset

Female, burglar. Of St Peter's Port, Guernsey.

On 27 May 1556 Vincent Gosset went to the house of Nicholas le Conronney at around 10pm and stole a silver cup. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

She took the stolen silver cup to Perotine Massey, asking her to lend her sixpence against it. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

Gosset was apprehended, examined and confessed to taking the goblet. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

She was found guilty and sentenced to be whipped, her ear to be nailed to the pillory, and then to be banished from the island. 1563, p. 1542, 1570, p. 2127, 1576, p. 1849, 1583, p. 1943.

 
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Guernsey, Channel Islands

In the sixteenth century a Deanery in the diocese of Winchester.

St Peter's Port: Main town in the middle of the east coast of the island

St Saviour: Parish in the south-west of the island, three miles west-by-south from St Peter's Port, embracing the villages of Mont Sant and Perelles.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1967 [1943]

Queene Mary. The story of 3. Garnesey women martyred by the Papistes.

MarginaliaTestified and recorded by Peter Moone. MarginaliaAnno 1556. Iuly.incounter with the ghostly enemyes, the world, the fleshe, and the Deuill. And boldely to stande to the confession of Christ, and of his Gospel, saying with the Apostles: Whether it be right in the sight of god, that we should obey you more then God, iudge ye.

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¶ A tragicall, lamentable, and pitifull Hystory, full of most cruell and tyranicall Murther, done by the pretensed Catholiques,  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 226, fn 2

"Wretched Papists," Edit. 1563, p. *1541. -ED.

vpon three woman and an Infant: to wit, the mother, her two daughters, and the childe, in the Isle of Garnesey, for Christes true Religion, the yeare of our Lord. 1556. Iuly. 18. 
Commentary  *  Close
The Guernsey Martyrs

Almost from the moment it was printed, the veracity of Foxe's account of this horrible episode was challenged. The reader seeking to understand both this episode, and the context in which it occurred, can do no better than consult D. M. Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk: 1996), esp. pp. 55-83.

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Foxe's basic account of this tragedy first appeared in the 1563 edition. It was based on the petition of Mathieu Cauches (the brother of Catherine Cauches) made to the privy council asking for the punishment of those who burned his sister and his nieces (see Cal. of State Papers Domestic Add. VI, p. 484). Someone on the privy council, probably William Cecil, supplied Foxe with a copy of this document.

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In 1567, the catholic polemicist Thomas Harding printed a brief but stinging attack on Foxe's account of the incident, which accused Foxe of lying and the three women who were executed as being immoral criminals who received a deserved punishment (Thomas Harding, The Reiondre to Mr Jewels replie against the sacrifice of the Masse [Louvain: 1567], STC 12761, fos. 184r-185v).

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In the 1570 edition, Foxe responded to this, first by adding additional documentation, which confirmed the accuracy of his first account. (It also enabled him to add the names of the martyred women and of Jacques Amy). Most of this documentation sprang from the successful efforts of Thomas Effart, a Guernsey jurat (one of twelve people who, under the baliff, formed Guernsey's royal court, which administered the internal affairs of the island) to secure a pardon for JacquesAmy and the other officials responsible for the burnings, and from the pardon itself. In response to Harding's claims that Massy was unmarried and her son illegitimate, Foxe obtained testimony from a Huguenot minister living in London who had conducted Massy's marriage. (This, by the way, is a good example of the ways in which catholic attacks on the first edition spurred Foxe on to greater research). Foxe then added a direct rebuttal of Harding's arguments.

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of three women with a young Infant, burned in the Isle of Garnesey. MarginaliaIuly. 18.AMong all and singular Historyes touched in this Booke before, as there be many pitifull, diuers lamentable, some Horrible and Tragicall: so is there none almost either in cruelty to be compared 

Commentary  *  Close

This is a rare example of the language of a passage being less restrained in the 1570 edition than in the 1563 edition; this is another result of Foxe responding to Harding.

or so farre of from all compassion and sense of humanity, as this merciles fact of the Papistes, done in the Isle of Garnsey, vpon three women and an infant, whose names be these as folow.

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Katherine Cawches. the Mother.
Guillemine Gilbert. the daughter.
Perotine Massey. the other daughter.
An Infant. the sonne of Perotine.

But before I come to the purpose of this story, it shall be necessary, for the better explayning of the matter, to begin first with the circumstances, whereupon the first Originall and occasion did rise of this tragicall cruelty. The case was this.

The xxvij. day of May. an. 1556. in the Isle of Garnsey, which is a member of England, in a towne there called S. Peters port, was a noughty woman named Vincent Gosset, who being euill disposed, went (the day aforesaid) to the house of one Nicholas le Conronney, dwelling in the towne of the sayd S. Peters Porte, about ten of the clocke at night, MarginaliaThe first occasion of the trouble of these women.and there taking the key of the house (lying vnder the doore) entred into a Chamber towarde the street, where she espying a Cup of Siluer within a Cupbord, tooke it away, and so conueied her selfe out of þt house agayne. Who immediately after this fact done (whether by counsell or by what occasiō else, I haue not to say) brought the sayd Cup to one Perotine Massey, an honest woman, dwelling in the sayd towne, desiring her to lend her vj. d. vpon the same.

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Perotine seing the cup or goblet, & suspecting (as truth was) the same to be stollen, answered that she woulde not take it: yet neuerthelesse, hauing knowledge of the owner theerof, tooke it, to restore it agayne to whom it did apperteyn, and to the end she should not cary it to another, gaue her thē presently vj. d. Where moreouer is to be noted, that Thomas Essart sayth and testifieth, 

Commentary  *  Close

This passage, added in 1570, is a good example of Foxe finding information which cleared the three executed women in Effart's attempt to secure a pardon for the officials who condemned them. In the 1563 edition, Foxe merely said that Conronney suspected Gosset; he did not say that Massy informed on Gosset to Conronney.

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that knowledge was geuen by the sayde Perotine to Conronney touching the stealing of his piece, who eftsoones vpō the misliking therof attached the sayd Vincent Gosset, of the trespasse. Who being apprehended and examined vpon the same, immediatly confessed the fact, desiring to haue one sent wyth her (which was Collas de Loutre) with vj. d. to fetch agayne the goblet, where it was: And so did.

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The next day folowing, the kinges officers being informed of the premises by one MarginaliaNicholas Cary Constable, occuser.Nicholas Cary of the sayde towne Constable, assembled the Iustices there to inquire and examine further, as well vpon that facte of Vincent Gosset, as vpon other griefes and things there amisse. So that after declaration made by the officers and Constable before the Iustice, for that the sayd Constable did report to haue founde certayne vessell of Pewter in the house of the foresayd Perotine Massey (who then dwelt with her mother Katherine Cauches, & her Sister Guillemine Guilbert) the which vessell did beare no marke, and especially for that there was a Peuter dishe, whereof the name was scraped out, theyr bodyes vpon the same were attached, MarginaliaKatherine with her two daughters, imprisoned in the Castel.& put in prison, & theyr moueable goodes taken by inuētory. Within a few daies after these things this done & past, these 3. sely 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., innocent.

women abiding thus in durance in the castle, made theyr supplication to the Iustices to haue iustice ministred vnto them, videlicet: If they had offended the law, then to let them haue the law: if not, beseeching to graunt them the benefite of Subiects. &c. Which supplication put vp, thereupon were they appoynted to come to theyr answere the fift day of Iune, in the yeare aforesayd. Vppon

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which day, after straight examining of the matter, and the honest aunswering of the cause by the sayde good woman, MarginaliaKatherine with her two daughters, stand to the iudgement of their neighbours.at the last they submitted them to the report of their neighbours, that they were no theeues, nor euill disposed persons, but liued truely and honestly, as became Christian women to do, the false and vntrue report of theyr accusers notwithstanding.

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So the cause being thus debated, after the inquirye made by the kinges Officers, they were founde by theyr said neighbors not guilty of that they were charged wyth, MarginaliaThe three women quit of theft and dishonestye.but had liued alwayes as honest women among them: sauing onely that to the commaundementes of holy church, they had not bene obedient. &c. Vpon this triall, & verdit of the neighbours, it was in fine adiudged, firste that the sayd Vincent Gosset, being atteinted of fellonye and condemned for the same should be whipped, and after her eare being nailed to the pillory, should so be banished out of the Isle without further punishment. And as touching the other three women, MarginaliaNew trouble against the three women, for not comming to the Church.the Mother with her two daughters, for theyr not comming to the Church, they were returned prisoners agayn into the Castle the first of Iuly. And thus farre concerning the true discourse of this matter, with all the circumstaunces and appurtenaunce of the same in euery poynt as the case stoode, according to the faythfull tenour and testimony of the Garnesey menne written with theyr owne handes both in Frenche and English tongue. 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe added this passage in 1570; it was a response to Harding's attack and was intended to remind his readers and his critics that this account was based on documentary sources.

Wherein you see what false surmised matter was pretended agaynst these women, and nothing proued, and howe by the attestation of theyr neighbours they were fully clered of that facte, and should by the temporall Courte haue bene dismissed, had not the spirituall Clergy men picking matter of religion agaynst them, exercised such extremitye in persecuting these miserable prisoners, that in no case they could escape theyr bloudye handes, till at length they had brought them (as you shall heare) to theyr finall ende. For after the time of this declaration aboue mentioned made by the neighbours, whereby they were purged of al other thinges, & being then known of theyr not comming to the Church, the Bailiefes Lieutenaunt and the Iustice, thinking the matter not to perteyne to them, but to the Clergy, forthwith wrote theyr letters or Mandate vnder theyr signes to the deane, whose name was MarginaliaIaques Amye Deane of Garnesey persecutor.Iaques Amy, and Curates of the sayd Isle: The contentes wherof here foloweth.

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¶ A Letter sent from the Bailieffes Lieutenaunt, and Iurates of Saynt Peters Port, to the Deane and Curates of the Isle of Garnesey.

MarginaliaA letter of the Bayliffes to the Deane of Garnesey.MAyster Deane and Iustices in your Court and iurisdiction, after all amiable recommendations, pleaseth you to know that we are informed by the deposition of certayn honest men, past before vs in maner of an inquiry: in the which inquiry Katherine Cawches and her two daughters haue submitted themselues in a certayne matter criminall. Wherein we be informed that they haue bene disobedient to the commaundementes, and ordinances of the Church, in contēning and forsaking the masse and the ordinances of the same, agaynst the will and commaundement of our souereigne Lord the king and the Queene. Wher of we send you the sayd matter, for as much as the matter is spirituall, to the end you may proceed therein after your good discretions, and as brieflye as you can possible, and also that it perteined to your office, recommēding you to God, the which geue you grace to do that perteineth to right and iustice. Written the first day of the moneth of Iuly, the yeare of our Lord. 1556.

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After these letters, and information thus addressed to Iaques Amy Deane, and to other of the Clergy, the sayde women were agayne commensed before the Iustice aforesaid with his assistances. In the presence of whom they being examined of theyr fayth, concerning the ordinances of the Romish church, made their aunswere that they would obey and keepe the ordinaunces of the king & Queene, & the cōmaundementes of the church, notwithstanding that they had sayd and done the contrary in the time of K. Edward the 6. in shewing obedience to his ordinaunces and commaundementes before. After which aunswere taken, they were returned againe to prison, vntill the other had an answere of their letter frō the deane & his cōplices. During which time, the Deane & curates gaue their information touching the sayd women, and deliuered the same to the Bailiefe and Iurates, MarginaliaRash information geuen, before the cause was heard.cōdemning and reputing them for hereticks, the women neither hearing of any information, neither yet being euer examined at any time before of theyr fayth and religion. Wherupon when the said Bailife & Iurates vnderstood that the sayd Deane & Curates had not examined the women of theyr fayth, would not sitte in

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