Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Denley

(d. 1555)

Gentleman from Maidstone in Kent. Martyr.

John Denley was apprehended. 1563, pp. 1244-45, 1570, p. 1864 , 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

Denley sent a letter to John Symson, Ardeley and others in prison. 1563, p. 1246, 1570, p. 1865, 1576, p. 1597, 1583, p. 1684.

Articles were presented against him which he answered. 1563, pp. 1246-47, 1570, pp. 186566 , 1576, pp. 1597-98, 1583, p. 1684-85.

On 1 July 1555 he appeared at the consistory court of St Paul's and was condemned on 5 July. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1597-8, 1583, p. 1685.

Robert Smith was held in a chamber at Bonner's house while Bonner went to condemn John Denley and John Newman. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Denley sang a psalm at his burning, for which Story rebuked him. He was burned at Uxbridge about 28 July 1555. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Faucet

(d. 1580)

Born in Sedbergh, Yorkshire. [Venn]

John Bland was once tutor to Dr Faucet. 1563, p. 1227, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Faucet stated that he was brought up in the same house and born in the same parish as Bland, and then warned him not to take a stand against the church. Bland dismissed him. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582 1583, 1583, p. 1670.

He took part in Thornden's examination of Bland. 1563, p. 1225, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Bland was given the chance to talk to Faucet in private if he wished. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1583, 1583, p. 1671.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Wright was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, bishop of Dover, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Faucet was judge at the examination of John Lomas, Agnes Snotten, Anne Albright, Joan Sole, and Joan Catmer. 1563, p. 1470, 1570, p. 2032, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1859.

[Note that for the examinations of Hopper, Lawrence, Sterne, Wright, and Cokar, he is listed as 'Rich. Faucet'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Newman

(d. 1555)

Martyr. Pewterer. Of Saffron Walden.

John Newman was apprehended, examined and condemned. 1563, p. 1244-45, 1570, p. 1865, 1576, pp. 1596-97 , 1583, p. 1684.

Articles were brought against him. 1563, pp. 1246-47, 1570, pp. 1865-66, 1576, p. 1597, 1583, p. 1684.

Robert Smith was held in a chamber at Bonner's house while Bonner went to condemn John Denley and John Newman. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

On 1 July 1555 Newman appeared at the consistory court of St Paul's and was condemned 5 July. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1597-8, 1583, p. 1685.

He met with Justice Edmund Tyrrell, shortly before he was burned. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

He was burned at Saffron Walden on 31 August 1555. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686

[or]

He was burned at Uxbridge with John Denley and Patrick Packingham around 28 August 1555. 1563, pp. 1267-68.

John Newman was apprehended in Kent and examined there by Thornden and others at Tenterden. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, pp. 1686-87, p. 1950.

He was brought before Bonner and condemned with Denley and Packingham. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Newman wrote a letter to Thornden about his conduct and doctrine. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

He was examined by Thornden and gave answers. 1570, p. 2134-35, 1576, pp. 1856-57, 1583, p. 1950-51.

John Newman proposed arguments on the sacrament. 1570, p. 2135, 1576, pp. 1857-58, 1583, p. 1951.

He was burned at Saffron Walden. 1570, p. 2135, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1951.

Foxe recounts John Newman's faith and occupation. 1563, pp. 1268-69, 1583, pp. 1687-88. [NB: Foxe calls him Richard in 1563, apparently confusing him with his brother of that name.]

John Newman was examined before Thornden, Collins and others. 1583, pp. 1686-87.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Harpsfield

(1519? - 1575)

Archdeacon of Canterbury; vicar-general of London. Author of the most important contemporary attack on the Acts and Monuments. Younger brother of John Harpsfield [DNB]

Nicholas Harpsfield discussed the sacrament and ceremonies with Thomas Hawkes on 30 June 1554, but soon gave up hope of changing Hawke's opinions. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1590

Harpsfield took depositions regarding John Tooley's heretical speech from the gallows. 1563, p. 1144

He examined Thomas Wattes on 4 May 1555 and he urged Wattes to recant. Wattes refused, telling Harpsfield that his efforts were in vain. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, 1596

Nicholas Harpsfield is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Master Collins (comissary), in Thornden's house. Talk took place between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 21 May Bland appeared in the chapter house before Nicholas Harspfield. 1563, pp. 1221-23, 1570 p. 1846, 1576 p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

George Brodbridge was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August for having refused to say confession to a priest. 1563, p. 1273. The examination is referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Robert Streater was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

James Tutrye was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

John Webbe was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

Harpsfield is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Harpsfield took part in Richard Woodman's fifth and sixth examinations. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-94, 1576, pp. 1890-93, 1583, pp. 1999-2002.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of five martyrs at Canterbury so that they could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Patrick Packingham

(1534? - 1555)

Martyr.

Patrick Packingham was apprehended, examined and condemned. 1563, p. 1244-45, 1570, p. 1864 , 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

Articles were bruoght against him and he gave answers. 1563, pp. 1246-47, 1570, pp. 1865-66 , 1576, pp. 1597-98, 1583, p. 1684-85.

On 1 July 1555 he appeared at the consistory court of St Paul's and was condemned on 5 July. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1597-8, 1583, p. 1685.

He was burned at Saffron Walden on 31 August 1555 ?. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686

[or]

he was burned at Uxbridge with John Denley and John Newman around 28 August 1555. 1563, pp. 1267-68.

[Foxe also refers to him as 'Patrick Pattingham'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Thornden

(d. 1558)

Suffragan Bishop of Dover (1545-1558) [ODNB]

Richard Thornden is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 13 June 1555 John Bland was brought before Thornden. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Bland asked that the bishop of Dover and Master Collins be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 20 June, Bland was reexamined, his articles read by the bishop of Dover and Bland's answers made. 1563, p. 1229.

Bland referred to Thornden's library as a source for texts for any discussion of scripture. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Thornden stated that Bland had preached many heresies. Faucet wais present during this discussion. 1563, p. 1225, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Cyriac Pettit was present during the disputation between Bland and Nicholas Harpsfield on 21 May 1555. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring Bland and Master Collins (comissary) before him, in Thornden's house. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 13 June [1555] Bland was brought before Richard Thornden, Robert Collins and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Thornden asked Bland if he knew of Oecolompadius and Zwingli, to which Bland responded that he had seen 'parte of their doinges'. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1583, 1583, p. 1671.

On 20 June Bland was reexamined and his articles read by Richard Thornden. Bland's answers were made and condemnation given. 1563, pp. 1229-30, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland was condemned by Dover. 1563, p. 1230, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland, Sheterden and Middleton were condemned on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned John Frankesh. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned Humphrey Middleton. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He took part in the last examination of Nicholas Sheterden and condemned him on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

Thornden examined and condemned William Cokar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He examined Richard Colliar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Colliar on either 26 June, 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or16 August 1555 (1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Hopper. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Hopper on 26 June or 26 July 1555 (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 16 July 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned Henry Laurence. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Laurence on 26 June or 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 2 August 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Sterne. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden was referred to by William Sterne as 'Dick of Dover'. 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden examined and condemned Richard Wright. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

George Catmer, Robert Streater, George Brodbridge, Anthony Burwarde and James Tutty, martyrs, were examined by the bishop of Dover. 1563, p. 1273, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

John Web was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

John Newman was apprehended in Kent and examined there by Thornden and others at Tenterden. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, pp. 1686-87, p. 1950.

Newman was brought before Bonner and condemned with Denley and Packingham. Newman wrote a letter to Thornden about his conduct and doctrine. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thornden is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thornden condemned John Philpot of Tenterden, William Hay of Hythe, Thomas Hudson of Selling, Matthew Bradbridge of Tenterden, Thomas Stephens of Biddenden, Nicholas Final of Tenterden, William Lowick of Cranbrooke, and William Prowting of Thornham. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].]

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Joan Bradbridge, Walter Apelbye of Maidstone, Petronyll, his wife, Edmund Allin of Frittenden, Katherine,his wife, Joan Mannings, wife of Maidstone, Elizabeth, a blind maiden were all examined by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Edward Benden petitioned the wealthy men of Staplehurst to write to Thornden, bishop of Dover, asking that his wife, Alice Benden, be released. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Benden told Thornden that his wife was being manipulated by her brother, Roger Hall, who gave her money, comforted her, and persuaded her not to attend mass. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Benden told Thornden that she would not be shriven by her parish priest if sent home. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden released her, telling her to go to church 'when thou wilt'. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden sent Alice Benden to 'Monday's Hole' prison. Her brother had great difficulty in finding where she was imprisoned but eventually found her five weeks after she had been moved. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

On 25 March 1557 Alice Benden was called before Thornden, who asked her to relent. She refused, telling him that his treatment of her was not of God. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent her to Westgate, where she was cleaned up, but her skin was so poor and her body so weak, that she could hardly walk and her skin peeled away. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She remained at Westgate until the end of April, when she was brought before Thornden and condemned. She was then sent to the Castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Joan Bradbridge had two children, Patience and Charity. She asked Thornden to protect them after her death but he refused. 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden was taken with a palsy whilst watching a game of bowls at Bourne. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Thornden died in the pulpit after giving pardon and remission of sins to his congregation. 1563, p. 1705.

[Referred to as 'Thorton' and 'Dick of Dover'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Collins

Commissary of Canterbury diocese. [BCL 1522 Foster

Foxe states that Collins was the cardinal's factor before coming to England 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Robert Collins demanded that Bland return the following day but Bland did not appear, due to urgent business. Bland wrote a letter regarding this. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Robert Collins, in Thornden's house. Foxe reports the talk between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

Around 28 June Bland returned to Collins, where he proceeded against Bland before Master Cockes of Sturray and Markes the apparitor. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland remained in the castle of Canterbury until 2 March, when he was taken to the chapter house of Christ Church (Canterbury), to the suffragen of Canterbury, Master Collins, Master Mylles and others, then to Master Oxenden, Master Petit, Master Webbe and Master Hardes (these were all justices). 1563, p. 1224, 1570, p. 1848, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1669.

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Bland and Collins argued over abiding by the laws of the realm and of the sacrament. 1563, pp. 1224-25, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, pp. 1582-83, 1583, pp. 1669-70.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden, 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

John Newman was examined before Thornden, Collins and others. 1583, pp. 1686-87.

Richard Wright was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, bishop of Dover, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Collins took part in the examination of John Lomas, Agnes Snotten, Anne Albright, Joan Sole, and Joan Catmer. 1563, p. 1470, 1570, p. 2032, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1859.

John Newman was examined by Thornden and others, among whom was Robert Collins. 1570, pp. 2134-35, 1576, pp. 1856-57, 1583, pp. 1950-51.

Talk took place between Sir John Baker, Collins and Edmund Allin. 1570, pp. 2165-66, 1576, pp. 1870-71, 1583, pp. 1979-80.

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Saffron Walden
NGR: TL 540 385

A parish and town having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Uttlesford, county of Essex. 27 miles north-north west from Chelmsford, 42 miles north-north east from London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Colchester, Diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1974 [1950]

Queene Mary. Exa. of Thomas More, Iohn Iackson, and Iohn Newman.

MarginaliaAnno 1556. Iuly.nall lyfe. For they be they that testifie of me.

Cooke. This is a wise proofe, quoth hee.

Iackson. It is so, quoth I? What say you then to these wordes that the Prophet Dauid sayd? What soeuer hee be that feareth the Lord, he will shewe him the way that hee hathe chosen: his soule shall dwell at ease, and his seede shall possesse the land The secretes of the Lorde are amonge them that feare hym, and he sheweth them his couenaunt. &c.

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Cooke. Well, quoth he, you shall bee ridde shortly one way or other.

Iackson. Thē I said to him: my life lyeth not in mans handes: therefore no man shall do more vnto me then god will suffer him.

Cooke, No quoth he? Thou art a stubborne & naughty fellow.

Iackson. You cannot iudge of me, quoth I, excepte you did see some euill by me.

Cooke. No, quoth he? MarginaliaAlthough they call you Papists, yet they iudge you not to death.Why may not I iudge thee, as well as thou, and thy fellowes iudge vs, and call vs Papistes?

Iackson. Why, quoth I? that is no iudgement, but Christ sayth: If you refuse me, and receiue not my worde, you haue one that iudgeth you. The word that I haue spokē vnto you now, shall iudge you in the last day.

Cooke. I pray thee tell me, who is the head of the congregation?

MarginaliaHead of the Church.Iackson. I aunswered, and sayd: Christ is the head.

Cooke, But who is the head in earth?

Iackson. I sayd: Christ had members here in yearth.

Cooke. Who are they, quoth he?

Iackson. They, quoth I, that are ruled by the worde of God.

Cooke. You are a good fellow, quoth he.

Iackson. I am that I am quoth I.

Cooke. Then he sayd to my keeper, haue him to prison agayne.

Iackson. I am contented with that, quoth I: and so we departed. I aunswered no further in this matter, because I thought he shoulde not haue my bloud in a corner. But I hope in the liuing God, that when the time shall come before the congregation, I shall shake theyr building on an other maner of fashion. MarginaliaThe buildinges of the Papistes be but daubed walles.For they build but vpon sande and their walles be daubed with vntempered morter, and therefore they cannot stand long.

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Therefore good brothers and sisters, be of good cheare for I trust in my God, I, and my other prison fellowes shall goe ioyfully before you, praysing God most hartily, þt we are coūted worthy to be witnesses of his truth, I pray you accept my simple aunswere at this time, commyttyng you vnto God.

Of this Iohn Iackson, besides this his foresayde aunsweres and examination before Doctor Cooke one of the Commissioners, no more as yet came vnto our handes. 

Commentary  *  Close

This is flatly disingenuous. Foxe had a number of letters to Jackson which revealed that Jackson was opposed to predestination and held other opinions which Foxe regarded as heretical (see BL, Additional MS 19400, fos. 62r-63r and ECL MS 260, fos. 27r, 239r-v and 244r-245v.

Partly because of Foxe's reticence we do not know whether Jackson survived Mary's reign or not.

¶ The examination of Iohn Newman Martyr, which is to be referred to his story before, pag. 1683. 
Commentary  *  Close
Examination of John Newman

This material was only introduced in the 1570 edition and considerably out of chronological order, indicating that Foxe obtained these documents while the edition was being printed. Interestingly, Foxe never tried to integrate these materials with his earlier narrative of Newman's martyrdom until the 1583 edition and this attempt was bungled, creating a confusing repetition of documents.

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Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 243, bottom

This account of John Newman has been given before; he was burned August 31st, 1555, and therefore it seems wholly out of place here.

MarginaliaReferre this to the pag. 1683.IOhn Newman was first apprehended in Kente, dwelling in the towne of Maydestone, and there was examined before D. Thornton 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe earlier claimed that Newman and John Denley was arrested in Essex when they were intercepted by Sir John Tyrell when the two were carrying a letter to the martyr John Simpson. If that account is correct, the question arises: when was Newman examined by Thornden whose jurisdiction was in Kent, not Essex? One possible explanation was that Newman had been arrested in Kent before his final arrest in Essex and had been released; possibly because he had recanted. If this is the case, Foxe may well not have wanted to mention this initial recantation.

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Suffragan,  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 243, fn 3

This suffragan bishop is called "Thornden" by some writers. See Wharton's Observations on Strype's Memorials of Cranmer, p. 257. - ED.

and others, at Tenterden. From thence he was brought to Boner, and there condemned with M. Denley and Pachyngham, and burned at Saffron Walden, as is before storyed. But because his examinations and aunsweres before the Suffragan came not then to my handes, I thought here in this place to bestow them, rather then they shuld vtterly be suppressed. And first what his aunswere was, by writing to the sayd Suffragan, after his apprehension, you shall heare by the tenour of his owne wordes as follow.

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MarginaliaThe copye of Iohn Newmans wordes in writing to D. Thornton.IT may please you to vnderstande, that for the space of all the time of king Edwardes raigne, we were dilligently instructed with continuall sermons made by such men whose faythe, wysedome, learning, and vertuous liuing, was commended vnto all men, vnder the kinges hande and seale, and vnder the handes of the whole Counsell. These men taught dilligently a long tyme, perswading vs by the allegations of Gods word, that there was no transubstantiation, nor corporall presence in the sacrament. Their doctrine was not beleued of vs sodainly, but by their cōtinuall preaching: and also by our continuall prayer vnto god that we might neuer be deceiued, but if it were true that GOD would incline our hartes vnto it: and if it were not true, that wee might neuer beleue it.

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We wayed that they laboured with Gods word, and we as-

ked the aduise of our frendes: neyther could wee finde that they preached false doctrine. We considered also, as wee did learne, that the kinges Grace and his Counsell, and the most part of al the whole realme, beleued as they taught, because no man preached the contrary. Also we knowe that the preachers were commaunded by the king and the lawes of the Realme, to preach vnto vs such doctrine, as was to the authoritie of Gods word, agreable and no other. And by their dilligent setting forthe of it, by the kinges commaundemente, and the whole consent of the whole Counsell, and by the authoritie of the Parliament, we embrased it, and receiued it, as a very infallible trueth taught vnto vs, for the space of vii. yeares. Wherefore, vntill such time as our consciences are otherwise taught and instructed by Gods word we cannot with safegard of our consciences, take it, as manye suppose at this time. And we trust in God that the Queenes mercifull highnesse, neither yet her most honourable Counsell will in a matter of fayth vse compulsion, nor violence, because faythe is the gift of God, and commeth not of man, neyther of mannes lawes, neyther at such time as men require it, but at such time as God geueth it.

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¶ The examination and answeres of Iohn Newman Martyr, before D. Thornton and others.

MarginaliaThe examination and aunsweres of Iohn Newman: which is to be referred to the pag. 1683.FIrst, one of the Doctours, or one of the Benche, eyther the Archdeacon, or Fauced, or some other, whose name Iohn Newman doth not expresse, beginneth asking in this wise.

Doctor. How say ye to this? This is my body whiche is geuen for you.

Newman. It is a figuratiue speach, one thing spoken, and an other ment, as Christ sayth: I am a vine, I am a dore, I am a stone, &c. Is hee therefore a materiall stone, a vine, or a dore?

Doct. This is no figuratiue speache. For he sayth: This is my body which is geuen for you, & so sayth he not of the stone vyne, or dore: but that is a figuratiue speach.

New. Christ sayth, MarginaliaThis cup is the new Testament, is a figuratiue speache.this cup is the new Testament in my bloud. If ye will haue it so meant, then let them take and eate the Cup.

Doct. Nay, that is not so meant, so it is a common phrase of speache among our selues: we say to our friende, drinke a cup of drinke, and yet we meane hee shoulde drinke the drinke in the cup.

New. Why if we will haue the one so vnderstoode, ye must so vnderstande the other.

Doct. Nay, it is a common vse of speach, to say drynke a cup of Ale, or Beere? And therefore it is no figuratiue speache.

New. The often vsing of a thing doth not make that thing otherwise then it is: MarginaliaWhat is a figuratiue speache? but where soeuer one thing is spoken and an other ment, it is a figuratiue speach.

Doct. Well, we will not stand here about. Howe say ye by the reall presence? Is not christes naturall body there that was borne of the virgine Mary?

New. No, I do not so beleue, neither can I so beleeue: for the soule of man doth not feede vpon naturall thinges, as the body doth.

Doct. Why, how then doth he feede?

New. I thinke the soule of manne dothe feede as the Aungelles in heauen, whose feedyng is onely the pleasue, ioye felicitie, and delectation that they haue of God: & so the soule of man doth feede and eate, through fayth, the body of Christ.

MarginaliaCollins reasoneth with Newman.Colens. Yea, but if the body doe not feede vppon naturall thinges, the soule cannot continue with the body: therefore the body must needes feede vppon naturall thinges, that both may liue together.

New. I graunt it to be true: but yet the soule dothe liue otherwise then the bodye, whiche doth pearysh: therefore naturall thinges do but feede the body onely. I pray you what did Iudas receiue at the supper.

Colens. Mary, Iudas did receaue the very body of Chryst but it was to hys damnation. MarginaliaWhether Iudas receiued the body of Christ, or no?

Newman. Why? was the Deuill entred into him before. Then he hadde both the Deuill and Chryst in hym at one tyme.

Colens. Nay, the deuill did enter into him afterwade.

New. Yea, and before too what doe ye thinke? had hee but one Deuill. Nay I think he had rather a legion of deuils at the latter end.

Colens. Well, put case it be so, what say you to that?

New. Mary, if Christe and the Deuill were both in Iudas at once, I pray you how did they two agree together?

Colens. Wee graunt they were bothe in Iudas at that tyme: for Chryst may bee where the Deuill is, if he will,

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