Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. English ecclesiastical affairs 1330-6458. Anti-papal writers59. Quarrel among mendicants and universities60. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Fulham

west London

OS grid ref: TQ 241 761

 
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Naples (Neapolis)

[Neaples]

Campania, Italy

Coordinates: 40° 50' 0" N, 14° 15' 0" E

Capital city of the historic kingdom of Naples

 
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Northampton
NGR: SP 755 605

A borough having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Spelhoe, county of Northampton, of which it is the chief town. 66 miles north-west by north from London. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St Giles, St Peter and St Sepulchre; all in the Archdeaconry of Northampton and Diocese of Peterborough. The livings of St Giles and St Sepulchre are discharged vicarages; All Saints is a vicarage; and St Peter is a rectory with the perpetual curacies of Kingsthorpe and Upton annexed.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

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Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Tewkesbury
NGR: SO 893 325

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the lower division of the hundred of Tewkesbury, county of Gloucester. 10 miles north-north-east from Gloucester. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Gloucester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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350 [327]

K. Henry. 3. The reuenge of God vpon Pope Jnnocent. Iewes burned at Northampton.

in the spirit of humilitie and loue, that thou shouldest correct thy manifolde errors. But thou wyth a proud eye and disdainful hart hast despised my wholesome admonitions. Woe to thee that despisest, shalt not thou also be despised? And so the Bishop departing from the Pope, stroken as is said on the side, left him for half dead, and so lying in sorow & lamentation. Wherupon his chamberlains being amased hearing these things, came rūning to the pope to know what him ailed. To whome the Pope much troubled and vexed in his spirit, sayd: that great terrors in his slepe, vehemently disturbed and molested him in such sorte, that he thought he should neuer recouer it, nor be restored to himselfe againe. Oh (sayeth he) howe sore is my side, and howe egerly it vexeth me, as being runne through with a speare. MarginaliaThe Pope disquieted in his minde.Neither did the Pope eate or drinke all that day, but faining himself to be sicke of a burning ague, kept in. And yet the indignation of the irefull hand of God (sayth the story) so left him not.

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For after these wholesome admonitions geuen to hym by the seruaunt of God: MarginaliaThe reuenge of God vpon pope Innocent.the Pope not regarding them, but all set vpon warre, suppression of his enemies, and secular affaires, gaue his minde wholy vnto them. And yet all his labors, counsailes, & expences bestowed vpon them, could neuer prosper after that day, in that he wēt about. For the Pope the same time hauing warre with the Apulians, MarginaliaThe Popes army vanquished and confoundedall his army fighting vnder þe Popes nephew their captaine, were slaine & confounded the number of many thousands. Whose lamentable slaughter al þe countrey of the Romains did much bewaile. The Pope not yet quiet in his minde, directeth his iorney towarde Naples, although sore vexed in his side like a man sicke of a plurisie, or smitten rather wt a speare. Neither could any phisicke of his Cardinals help him. For Robert of Lincolne (sayth the story) did not spare him. And hee that woulde not heare him gently correcting him, being aliue, his stripes did he feele whē he was dead. So that hee neuer after that enioyed any luckie or prosperous day, till time of his death: nor yet any prosperous or quiet night vntill the morning. MarginaliaThe death of Pope Innocent. 4. Anno. 1255.And so continued he vnto his death, which shortly after ensued, he being at Naples. An. 1255. or as N Triuet recordeth. An. 1254. And thus haue ye the whole discourse betweene Robert Grosted & Pope Innocent.

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MarginaliaA note to the reader concerning the appearing of dead men.¶ In the which story is to be noted (gentle reader) that although in the storie of Cestrensis, of Mathewe Paris. and of Flor. hist. it is expresly testified and reported, that the Pope was smitten with the staffe of Robert the foresaid Byshop of Lincolne: yet thou must wisely vnderstand, that how so euer Gods hand dealeth heere in this world in punishing his enemies, or how so euer the Image of things not sene but phantasied, offer themselues to the secrete cogitation of man (his senses being a slepe) by the operation or permission of God, woorking after some spirituall influence in our imaginations: certaine it is, that no dead man materially can euer rise againe or appeare before the iudgement day, to any man with his staffe or without his staffe, to woorke any feate, after he haue once departed this life.

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MarginaliaDissention betwene the arch. of Cant. and the Church of Lincolne.After the death of this Robert Grosted bishop of Lincolne, great dissention fel betwene the Archb. of Cant. Boniface, and the canons of the said church of Lincolne, about the right of geuing prebendships, and about the reuenues of the said church, in time of the bishops see being now vacant. Which right & power the Archbishop claimed to him selfe, but the canons of that Church (maintaining the contrary side) stood against him, MarginaliaExcommunication abused.and for the same were excommunicated of the Archbishop. Amōg whom, one M. Wolf resisting the Archb. to the face, in the name of all the other canons, made vp his appeale to Rome, MarginaliaAppellation made to Rome. where much money on both sides was spent. At length, after this Grosted, was elected MarginaliaHenry Lexintō B. of Lincolne.Henry Lexinton in the see of Lincolne.

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About which time, the wicked Iewes 

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Persecution of Jews

These brief accounts of Jewish activities in the thirteenth century were strategically placed to make a polemical point about the superstitions of the Roman Church. As examined in Sharon Achinstein, 'John Foxe and the Jews', Renaissance Quarterly, 54:1 (2001), pp. 86-120, the tale of a Jew falling into a privy in Tewkesbury on a Sabbath day was a direct parallel to the subsequent story of Walter Gray, Archbishop of York, taken from Flores Historiarum II, pp. 406, 408-9. Grey died when he over-fasted and Foxe describes this, in parallel to the Jews of the time, as the result of the inanity of blind superstition by both Christians and Jews. For the most part Foxe concentrates here on Jewish ceremony as an example of their superstition. Various instances of blood libel are noted, such as in the story of Hugh of Lincoln taken from Walter of Guisborough, p. 185, and the Jews of Norwich taken from Matthew Paris, Chronica Maiora III, p. 305-6, and Ranulf Higden, Polychronicon VIII, p. 249. The account from Flores Historiarum II, pp. 381, 397, 407, on the removal of the Jews from France and Henry III charging the Jews 8,000 marks whether they left the kingdom or not further emphasised the characteristics of Jews as greedy and as having a destabilising influence in both kingdoms. The story of the Jews in Northampton, who planned to burn the city of London at Lent, was taken from Eulogium III, p. 120.

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Matthew Phillpott
University of Sheffield

at Lincolne had cruelly crucified, whipped, & tormented a certaine child named Hugo of 9. yeres of age. An. 1255. in the month of August. Ex Gualt. Gisburn. At length the childe being sought & found by þe mother, being cast in a pit. 32. of those abhominable Iewes were put to executiō. Wherof Mathew Paris. reciteth a long storie. MarginaliaA childe crucified of the Iews at Lincolne. The same or like fact was also intended by þe like Iewes at Norwich 20. yeres before vpon a certaine childe, whom they had first circumcised, & deteined a whole yere in custodie, intending to crucifie him, for the which the Iewes were sent vp to the tower of Lōdon, of whom 18. were hanged, & the rest remained long in prison. Ex Cestrens. lib. 7. MarginaliaEx Nic. Triuet. Ex Cestrens. li 7 cap. 34. Of this wicked Iewish people I find also in the boke of Flor. hist. that about this yere of our Lord 1255. they began first to be expelled out of Fraunce, MarginaliaEx Flor. hist. The Iewes expulsed out of Fraunce. by the commaundement of the French king, being then in Palestina, warring against the Turkes: By the occasion that it was obiected then by the Turke against him and other MarginaliaA childe circumcised of the Iewes, and kept a whole yeare to be crucified.Christian princes, for the reteining the Iewes amōgst thē which did crucify our sauiour, and warring agaynst them which did not crucifye him. Ex Flor. Hist Of these Iewes moreouer king Henry the same yere 1255. exacted to be geuen vnto him 8000. markes in paine of hanging. Who being much agreued therwith, & complayning that the king went about their destruction, desired leaue to be geuen thē of the king, that they might depart the realm, neuer to returne agayne. MarginaliaThe Iewes aske leaue to depart the realme of England. But the king committed the doing of that matter vnto Earle Richard his brother, to enforce them to pay þe mony whether they would or no. Moreouer of the same Iewes mention is made in the story intituled Eulogiū. Of the Iewes in Northhampton, who had amōg thē selues prepared wilde fire, to burn the city of Londō. MarginaliaEx Eulogio. Iewes burned at Northampton.For the which diuers of thē were takē, & burned in the time of Lent, in the said city of Northhamptō, which was 2. yeres before, about the yere of our Lord. 1253. Ex Eulogio. And for so much as mention here is made of the Iewes, I cannot omit what some English storyes write of a certaine Iew: who not long after this time about the yeare of our Lord. 1257. MarginaliaA Iewe fallen into a priuey, wold not be taken out for keeping his Sabboth dayfell into a priuy at Tuekesbury vpon a Sabboth day which for the great reuerence he had to his holy Sabboth, would not suffer himselfe to be plucked out. And so Lord Richarde Earle of Glocester, hearing thereof, would not suffer him to be drawne out on sonday for reuerence of the holy day. And thus the wretched superstitious Iew remaining there till Monday, was found dead in the dong.

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And to note the blinde superstitiō of that time, not only among the Iewes, but also among the christians, to omit diuers other storyes as of Walter Gray, Archbish. of Yorke, MarginaliaSuperstitious fasting noted in Watler arch. of Yorke.who comming vp to the Parliamēt at Londō. an. 1255. wt vnordinate fasting, did so ouercharge nature, & pyned himselfe, & (as the story mētioneth) did so drye vp hys braine: that he losing therby all appetite of stomack, going to Fulham, there within 3. dayes died, as in the compiler of Flor. Hist. is both storyed and reprehended. MarginaliaEx Flo. hist. Let this also be adioyned, which the forenamed author, and in the same yere is recorded of one named Peter Chaceporce, who diyng in Fraūce, an. 1255. MarginaliaSuperstition in seeking saluation by wronge meanes.left in bequest of his testamēt 600. marks for lands to be purchased to the house of Mertō for God to be serued there perpetually pro anima eius, & omnium fideliū. i. for his soules health, and all faythfull soules. As who would say, Christian fayth were not the ordinary meanes sufficient to saluation of faythfull soules, without the quire seruice of the Monkes of Merton.

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Ye haue heard it often complained before, how þe vsurped power of the Pope hath violētly and presumptuously encroched vpon the Church of England, MarginaliaThe Pope iniurious to the Church of England. in geuing & conferring benefices and prebends to his Italians and strangers, to the great damage and ruine of Christes flock manifold waies. 

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Papal oppression and Alexander IV

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

This violent iniury & oppression of þe Pope, as by no lawfull and gentle meanes could be reformed: so by occasion & meanes inordinate about this time, it began somwhat to be brideled. The matter whereof was this, as it is in the collector of Flor. Hist. recited. In the dayes of the raigne of this king 44. The Byshop of London named Fulco, had geuen a certaine prebende in the Church of S. Paul, to one master Rustandus þe Popes messenger heere in Englande. Who entring into the profession of the graie friers, & shortly after dying on the other side of the sea: the Pope immediatly conferred the sayd prebend to one of his specials, a like straunger, as þe other was before. MarginaliaA prebendship of pauls giuen both of the Pope and of the king at one time to two seuerall persons.About the same instant it befel, that the bishop also of London deceased, wherby the byshoprick now vacant fell into the kings handes. Who hearing of the death of þe forenamed Rustandus, gaue the sayd prebendship (geuen of the Pope before) to one Iohn Crakehale his vnder treasurer. Who with all solemnitie tooke his installation, vnknowing as yet that it was bestowed of the Pope before. It was not lōg after as time grew, but this being noised at Rome, forthwith commeth downe a certaine Proctor named Iohn Gras wyth the Popes embulled letters, to receaue the collation of the benefice by his commission procuratory, geuen by þe Pope: wherin Iohn Crakehale had bene already installed, as is aforesaide, by the kings donation. This matter comming in trauise before Boniface Archbishop of Cant. MarginaliaThe Popes donation preferred before the kinges.hee inquiring and searching which donation was the first, finding the popes graunt to be the former, gaue sentence with him against the king: so that in conclusion, the Romane clearke had the aduauntage of the benefice, although the other had long enioyed the possession therof before. Thus the popes man being preferred, and the Englishman excluded, after the partie had bene inuested & stalled after the vse and maner, hee as thinking to be in sure possession of his place, attempted with the rest to enter the Chapter house, but was not permitted so to do: wherupon the popes clerke geuing place to force and number, went toward the archbishop to

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complaine.
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