Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. English ecclesiastical affairs 1330-6458. Anti-papal writers59. Quarrel among mendicants and universities60. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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Lewes

A Welshman. Guard.

One day in July [year not filled in in text], a Welshman called Lewes (described as one of the guard) entered the shop where Wilmot was apprentice. Lewes was asked what the news at court was, to which he responded that Crome had appeared before the council and was to appear at Paul's Cross. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

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Wilmot told Lewes that he was sorry to hear the news of Dr Crome. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

Lewes told Wilmot that there had been troubles since the Bible was translated into English, that Crome was a heretic and then falsely accused Cromwell of biblical translation. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Foxe recounts Wilmot's conversation with Lewes. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Wilmot told Lewes that Crome preached nothing but the truth. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

A young servant of Daubney spoke to Lewes about what he had heard about the charges against Thomas Fairfax and Richard Wilmot. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

 
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Kingston

nr Lewes, East Sussex

OS grid ref: TQ 395 085

 
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Lewes
Lewes, Lewys
NGR: TQ 416 095

A borough, chiefly in the hundred and rape of Lewes, county of Sussex, of which it is the chief town. 7 miles north-east by east from Brighton. The borough comprises four parishes; St. Michael' s, which is a discharged rectory; St. Anne's and All Saints, which are the same; and St. John's under the Castle, which is a rectory. All are in the Archdeaconry of Lewes and Diocese of Chichester. The precinct of the castle is extra-parochial

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Rochester
NGR: TQ 730 686

An ancient city, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent. 8.5 miles north from Maidstone. The city is the seat of the bishopric, and comprises the parishes of St Nicholas and St Margaret, both in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Rochester. St Margaret's is a vicarage in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter, and St Nicholas is a vicarage in the patronage of the bishop.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Tonbridge
Tunbridge
NGR: TQ 585 460

A parish in the lowey of Tonbridge, lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent. 14 miles west-south-west from Maidstone. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Rochester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Winchester (Winton; Wenta; Wenton)

Hampshire

OS grid ref: SU 485 295

Historic capital of Wessex; former capital of England; county town of Hampshire; cathedral city

355 [332]

The letter of the Barons to the K. The kings answere. The battaile of Lewes.

many more, of whom he committed some to the Lord Nicolas of Hauersam to be kept in the same Castle well defēsed: some he led away with him, and some he sent to diuers Castels, and appointed Simon Mounfort to be cast into Windsore Castell. And all these things, as touching the taking of Northampton, were done on the Sabboth day in passion weeke, being the thyrd of Aprill, in the yeare of our Lord. 1264. And the king went forward euen to Notingham, burning and wasting the manners of the Lords and others his enemies, and there he gathered together his nobles, and greatly increased hys number.

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When this ill lucke was tolde of them that there were run away to the Earle Simon, whiche was comming towardes Northampton wt a great hoste: he was in a great rage, & yet was not discouraged. MarginaliaEarle Simon Mountfort fayneth him selfe sicke.But immediatly going to London, caused a chariot to be made him after the maner of lytters or couches, wherein he might ride as though he were sicke: for he fayned himselfe to be feeble and weake, whereas he was in deede a stout and valiaunt warriour. And there gathered to him other noble men that were cōfederate with him, Earles and Barōs, euery one bringing with them their seuerall armies. And preparing their ingynes of woode, MarginaliaRochester besieged of the Barons.they went to besiege Rochester, for the Earle of Worcester in the kynges behalfe, kept both the towne and castell. When they had gotten the first gate and the bridge, they were partly wounded and compelled to retire, and there that valiant knight Roger de la Bourne was wounded and very il handled: And whilest they continued siege there a while, it was told them that the kyng was comming toward London with a mighty host. And they sayd one to an other: if the king at hys cōming should take London, we shall be shut in as it were in a straight corner. Let vs therefore returne to London that we may keep in safety both the place and the people. Therefore appointing certaine persons to keepe the siege, they returned to London. At the length when the king came, they went forth with the Citizens to meete him, not with floures and palmes in their handes, but swordes and speares. MarginaliaThe Kyng shunneth London.The K. shunned them, and after he had the Castell of Kingston, which was the Erle of Glocesters, he went from thence to Rochester: where after he had killed a few, he brake þe siege, and from thence the king went to Tunbridge. And the towne and Castell now being geuen vp to him, he tooke there the Countesse of Glocester, & put her into an Abbey, not to be kept in hold, but to goe at libertye whether she would: And he left for the custody of the Castell and City a great part of his hoast to the number of aboue xx. picked out ensignes, for that it was commonly said that the Earle of Glocester would come out of hād to assault them. Which being done, he continued on his iourney to Winchester, where he receiued to peace, the seamen of the hauē townes. And three dayes after vpon the sonday following he came to the towne of Lewes, and was receaued into the Abbey, and his sonne Edward into the Castell. Then the Barons sent letters to the king the 12. day of May, the tenor wherof followeth.

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MarginaliaThe letter of the Lords to the kyng.TO theyr most excellent Lord Henry by the grace of God king of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitania: hys Barons and other his faythfull subiectes, being willing to keep their othe and fidelitie to God and him, send greeting and due obedidience with honour and reuerence. Whereas by many experimentes it is manifest, that some of your graces assistaunces haue reported to your maiesty many lyes of vs, working mischiefe, as much as in them lyeth, not onely agaynst vs, but agaynst you also and your whole Realme: Be it knowne to your highnes, that we haue bene alwayes willing to defend the health and sauegarde of your person with all our power and fealty due to your grace: purposing to vexe to the vttermost of our power and estate not onely our ill willers, but also your enemies, and the enemies of your whole Realme. If it be your good pleasure geue no credite to thē, we shall be alwayes found your faithfull. And we the Earle of Leiceister and Gilbert of Clare at request of the other, for vs & them haue put to our seales.

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These letters being read and heard, there was a counsell called, and the king writ back to them, and specially to the two Earles of Leicester and Glocester, in maner and forme following.

MarginaliaThe answer of the king to the LordsHEnry by the grace of God king of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Aquitanie. &c. To Simon Mountfort, and Gilbert de Clare, and their confederates. For as much as by the warre & generall disquietnes by your meanes raised vp in our whole realme, and also the burninges and other hurtfull enormities, it appeareth manifestly that you keepe not your fidelitie to vs ward, nor care any thing for our health or safety: And for that ye haue inorderlygreued our nobles, and other our faythfull subiectes, sticking faythfully and constantly to vs (as you haue certified vs) we accounting their losse as our owne, and their enemies as ours. And seing these my aforesayd faithfull subiects for the keeping of their fidelitie, do assist vs manfully and faythfully agaynst your vnfaithfulnes, we therefore care not for your fidelitie or loue, but defie you as our and their enemies. Witnes my selfe at lewes the day & yeare abouesayd

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MarginaliaThe letter of Richard K. of Almaine and prince Edward to the Barons.Also Richard king of Almaine, and Lord Edward the sonne of king Henry writ also to the Barons in this wise. Richard by the the grace of God, king of the Romaynes alwayes Augustus, and Edward the eldest sonne of the noble king of England, & al the other Barons and nobles constantly and faythfully in hart & deede cleauing to the foresayd king of England: to Simon Mountfort, and Gilbert de Clare and to all and singuler other their adherents in their conspiracie. By your letters whiche you sent to our Lord the noble king of England we haue vnderstanding that you defie vs, although before any such word, your defiaunce towardes vs was apparant inough by your cruell persecution in burning our possessions and spoyling our goodes: we therefore geue you to witte, that we all and euery one of vs, as your enemies, doe defie you all as our open enemies. And farther that we will not cease, where soeuer it shall lye in our power, to the vttermost of our force and might, to subuert your persons and all that you haue. As touching that you laye to our charge, that we geue neyther faythfull nor good counsell to our Lord the king, you say not the truth. And if your Lord Simon Mountfort, or Gilbert de Clare, will affirme the same in our Lord the kinges court: we are ready to get safeconduit for you to come to the sayd Court to try, and declare the truth of our innocency and the falsehood of you both, as forsworne traytors, by some man equall with you in nobilitie and stocke. All we, are contayned with the seales of the aforesayd Lordes, the Lord Richard, and the Lord Edward. Dated the day aforesayd.

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MarginaliaThe battaile of Lewes betwene the king and the Barons beginneth.Both which letters beyng read, they drew neare to the king for they were not farre distant from the place whiche is called Lewes. 

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Battle of Lewes

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

And for that there wanted to the Kinges store prouision for their horses, it was cōmanded them, on tewsday to go forth to seeke for hay and prouender. Which when they were gone forth, were preuented most of them, of their enemies and killed: but the residue returning, saw their enemies comming very early, on þe Wednesday morning, and making outcries stirred vp the king, & his hoste to arme themselues. Then the Barons comming to the full playne descended there, and girding & trimming their horses made fit their harnies to them. And there the Earle Simon made the Earle of Glocester, and Kobert Deuer, and many other new knightes: Which being done, he deuided and distincted his host into foure seueral battails. And he appointed noble men to guide & gouern euery battaile. And ouer þe first battayle were ordayned Captaines, Henry Mountfort the eldest sonne of the Earle Simon & Guido his brother, Lord Iohn de Bruch the yonger, & Lord Humfry de Boun. Ouer the second battaile, Lord Gilbert Clare Earle of Glocester, Lord Iohn the sonne of Lord S. Iohn and Lord William of Mouncherisi. And ouer the third, in whiche the Londiners were at their request, the Lord Nicholas Segraue was assigned. Which required also very instauntly, that they might haue þe first stroke in the battayle, at the aduentnre come what come woulde. But ouer the fourth battayle, the Earle himselfe was captayne with the Lord Thomas of Pilnestone. In þe meane season came forth the kinges host, preparing themselues to the field in three battayles: of whiche Edward the kynges sonne led the first, with the Earle of Warwicke and Valence the kings brother: and the secōd the king of Almaine guided, with hys sonne Henry: but the king with hys nobles guided the third. And the fourth legion the king appoynted not, by reason that he had left many of hys chiefe souldiours behinde him, to keepe the Castell and towne of Tunebridge agaynst the Earle of Glocester. And the most part of the kinges army were but young men, for the king thought not that his Barōs had bene come so nigh hand. Theyr armies being on both sides set in aray & order, they exhorted one an other on eyther party to fight valiantly: & after they buckled together, the battaile was great & many horsemen were ouerthrown euen in a moment. But by and by Edward the kings sonne with his band, as a fierce young gentlemen, & valiant knight fell vpon his enemies with such force, that he compelled them to recule backe a great way: so that the hinmost (thinking by reason of their geuing backe, that the foremost were slayne) ran many away of them, and taking water to passe ouer, were almost threescore souldiours drowned, & a few of thē being slaine, all the rest fled. Straight way the Londiners whiche had asked the first fight, knowing not howe the battaile went

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tooke
Ff.iiij.
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