Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. English ecclesiastical affairs 1330-6458. Anti-papal writers59. Quarrel among mendicants and universities60. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Ely

Elderly chantry priest at Windsor

At dinner at Windsor, Master Ely complained of laymen who meddled with the scriptures and was challenged by Robert Testwood. When Testwood supported the king's supremacy over the church, Ely called him a heretic, refused to have anything more to do with him and reported him to the dean's deputy. A few days later, the act of supremacy was passed and the dean returned, attacking papal supremacy. 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

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Warwick

Of Hadleigh

Warwick had an ear cut off, for seditious talk, during 'the commotion time in king Edwardes dayes' [presumably Kett's rebellion]. He heaped faggots around Rowland Taylor at the stake. He struck Taylor in the face with a faggot. 1563, p. 1079; 1570, p. 1703; 1576, pp. 1453-54; 1583, p. 1527.

 
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Chesterfield

Derbyshire

OS grid ref: SK 385 715

 
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Coventry
Couentry
NGR: SP 340 790

An ancient city and a county of itself, locally in the county of Warwick. 10 miles north-east from Warwick, 18 miles south-east from Birmingham. The city comprises the parishes of St. Michael, Holy Trinity and St. John Baptist, all in the Archdeaconry of Coventry, diocese of Coventry and Lichfield. St. Michael and Holy Trinity are vicarages. St. John is a rectory not in charge, annexed to the headmastership of the free school

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Ely
Ely
NGR: TL 540 800

A city in the Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge. 16 miles north-north-east from Cambridge. The city is exclusively of the liberty of the College, which is extra-parochial, and comprises the parishes of St. Mary and Holy Trinity, in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Dean and Chapter, within the Diocese of Ely, of which it is the seat

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Marlborough
Marlborough, Marlborow, Malbrough
NGR: SU 184 695

A borough and market town, having separate jurisdiction, although locally in the hundred of Selkley, county of Wilts. 27 miles north by east from Salisbury. Marlborough comprises the two parishes of St Mary the Virgin and SS Peter and Paul, within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Consistorial Episcopal court of Salisbury. The living of St Mary is a discharged vicarage, and that of SS Peter and Paul a discharged rectory

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Northampton
NGR: SP 755 605

A borough having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Spelhoe, county of Northampton, of which it is the chief town. 66 miles north-west by north from London. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St Giles, St Peter and St Sepulchre; all in the Archdeaconry of Northampton and Diocese of Peterborough. The livings of St Giles and St Sepulchre are discharged vicarages; All Saints is a vicarage; and St Peter is a rectory with the perpetual curacies of Kingsthorpe and Upton annexed.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Osney

near Oxford, Oxfordshire

OS grid ref: SP 505 065

 
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Warwick

OS grid ref: SP 285 655

Historic county town of Warwickshire

358 [335]

Kenelworth decree against the disherited. Kenelworth yeelded, and againe besieged.

which was both accursed, and a traytor, was not worthy of Christen buriall.

The same yeare also died Walter Cantilupus Byshop of Winchester, after whom succeeded Nicholas of Ely, the kinges Chauncellor.

The same yeare the king perceiuing, that vnlesse þe Castle of Kenilworth were recouered, and the boldnes of thē restrayned that kept the same: many euils and inconueniences might ensue therupon, to þe preiudice of his kingdom: for that the number increased euery day more & more, wasting and spoyling the country all about. Therfore, he gathered an army and came downe to Warwick, where he a while taryed expecting the meeting and assembling of hys Marqueses and Lordes, with engines and other munition sautable. Who when theyr bondes were furnished and mustred, and al thinges ready, the morow after Midsomer day he displayed hys banner, & began his vyage marching towardes Kenilworth & besieged the same. MarginaliaKenilworth castle besieged of the king. During which siege, by the aduise and counsaile of the king, the Popes Legate, and other noble men 12. persons were chosē which should haue the disposing of those thinges þt pertayned to the state of the Realme, & of those that had lost their landes and inheritaunces: who amongest other thinges, made and established this one prouiso, that was commōly called Kenelworth decree. MarginaliaKenilworth decree against the disherited.That all those which had lost their lādes by attaynder (although yet not attainted) should fyne therfore at the kinges pleasure, and take their lands of him agayn: paying some three yeares, some foure yeares, some two yeares reueneues of the same, according to the quallitie of the cryme & offence committed. All which prouisos or prouisions, were established and confirmed as well by the corporall othe, as by signment of the same with the handes & seales of al the Prelates and clergy of England, there assembled for that purpose by the Popes Legate vpon the feast of all Saints. When these things were thus finished, messengers were sent on the kings behalfe, as wel to those that kept þe castle of Kenilworth, as also to those that were assembled in the Ile of Ely: willing them to come vnder the protection of the Kinges peace, and yeld to the foresayd prouisos established by the twelue commissioners. Who altogether aunswered & sayd: that they would in no wise cōdescend therunto: both for that it was done without theyr consentes not being called vnto it, and also for that the said decree was ouer straight and intollerable. MarginaliaKenilworth decree gaynsayd by diuers. Within shorte space after, great famine and pestilence chaunced amongest them which kept the castle, in so much as they were without all hope of keeping the same: wherefore, soone after the king sending agayne to them to yeld the Castle and take theyr pardōs, they consulting together of their own estate: thus aunswered the kings messengers, if it please the king and his counsaile to permit vs to send our messenger vnto the Lord Symon Mounfort which is beyond the sea: that he may come by a certayne day to the defence of this hys garrison & fort: and that in the meane space, we be not disturbed by the kinges army that hath enuironed vs, til the return of our messēgers: If by the day appoynted he come not, we will yeld vp the same, so that we may be pardoned of life, limme, and moueables.

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MarginaliaKenilworth castle yelded vp to the king before the returne of the messengers out of Fraunce.When the messengers were returned, and had declared to the king their aunswere: he consulting with his Nobles about the matter, agreed to their petitions. And caused the truce to be proclaimed throughout all his campe, after that sufficient hostages were on either side geuē for the performance of the same: whereupon, they set forward theyr messengers, as before was sayd they woulde. But after that many of thē within the Castell being very greeuously vexed with the bloudy flixe and other diseases, in so much that the whole men might not abide the corruption, and anoyaunce of those that were diseased: deliuered vp the Castell before the returne of the messengers againe, and were permitted to goe whether they would to refresh themselues, as men molested with great vexation & miseries. After the rendring vp of the Castell, the king committed the custody therof to hys sonne Edmund, and so with hys host departing from the siege, came vpon Christmaus euens euen to Osney: where, he with great solemnity and triumph kept his Christmas during seuen dayes, and from thence with hys host came to Windsore, from whence after a few dayes he marched towardes Ely: In whiche Iland he besieged those, which were disherited, and sharpely assaulted them.

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The same yeare, Pope Clement the 4. promoted maister Walter Giffard Byshop of Bathe, to be Archbishop of Yorke.

In which yeare also the Church of England began to pay the tenthes of all their reuenues as wel spirituall as temporall, to the king: to continue for 3. yeares space, and this was done by the authoritie Apostolicall.

MarginaliaThe tenthes graunted to the K. by autoritie Apostolicall.Within a while after, the Barons which were yet remayning, gathered themselues together agayne: Amongst whome Iohn Daywile (being a subtile and stoute man of warre) began to haue a name & was well esteemed amongest them: who altogether did what mischiefe they might, and in the moneth of May, they assembled at Chesterfield, MarginaliaA new assembly of the Barrons at Chester field, where they had the ouerthrow. vnder the sayd Iohn Daywile & the Earle Ferarence, vpon whom the kinges souldiours, comming sodenly in the night toke them sleping, and slue many of them. Then the sayd Iohn Daywile quickly arming himselfe came forth: thinking wt more defence both to saue himself and to escape. Who in the way, stroke the Lord Gilbert Humsard such a blow with his dimilance, that he feld both him & his horse to þe ground, & so fled with a few more after him. And thus whilest the poore souldiors fought & were slayn, the Barōs fled away & saued thēselues. Also the Erle Ferarence fled, & hid himself in a Church. But being bewrayed by a womā he was taken forth, and led away prisoner. After this, the king kept a parliament at Northampton, MarginaliaAll the confederates of Symō Moūtfort, with their childrē disherited by the king.where he disherited all those, that tooke any part with the Erle Simon & al their childrē. Where also the Popes Legate Octobonus held a conuocation, MarginaliaSimō Moūtfort and his confederates excommunicated by the Popes Legate.and excōmunicated al such bishops, as had taken any part with Simon, against the king: of whō diuers he sent vp to Rome, to be absoyled of the pope, and farther the said Legate caused to be proclaymed certain decrees, which he himselfe had made: MarginaliaTenths grāted by the pope to the kyng and queene for vij. yeares.And also the new graūt of Pope Clemēt, to the king and Queene, of al the tenthes for seuen yeres to come. And shortly after a taxe also was fined vpon þe country of Norfolke: to the gathering wherof, Walter the byshop of Norwich was appoynted. Ex Scala mundi.

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After this, in the yeare of our Lord. 1267. MarginaliaAnno. 1247. The castle of Kenilworth again besieged. King Henry besieged agayne the Castell of Kenelworth, from the 7. day before the first day of Iuly, vntil the beginning of December: whether came Octobonus þe Popes Legate, by whose intreaty Henry Hastinges deliuered the same vnto the K. which stoutly had defended the same and resisted the kyng, hauing pardon graunted both for him and hys, of his lyfe, landes, goodes, and cattels. In which tyme also the Barons agayne assembled, with Iohn Dayuile in the Ile of Axioline, MarginaliaAn other assembly of the Barons at Axioline and discomforture of them. & so proceeded till they came to Lincolne: Which also they tooke, and spoyled the Iewes, and slue many of them: MarginaliaThe Iewes spoyled and slain at Lincolne.And entring their Sinagoge teare and rent the book of their law, and burnt the same, and all other writinges & obligations which they could come by. Which thing when the king heard, he sent thither hys sonne prince Edward: but as soone as they heard that, they fled into þe Ile of Ely, and fortified the same with Bulwarkes as strongly as they might, MarginaliaThe Barons fortefied the Ileland of Elye. at euery entraunce into the same. This was in the month of Aprill when Edward the kinges sonne came thither. Who for the great aboundaunce of waters in the same, could by no meanes enter the Iland, til at length by the counsayle of the inhabitauntes of that prouince, he caused with a number of workmen great trenches and ditches to be made, somewhat to conuey away the water: And so long vsed the Counsayle of them, in making bridges with planks and hurdles, til at last they entred the Iland. MarginaliaThe Ile of Ely assaulted and entred by prince Edward. Who as soone as they were entred, the Barons fled to London, where they were of the Londiners well entertayned. The rest which were in the Iland, yelded themselues (amongest whom was Roger Wake, Simō the yonger, and Peches) sauing their liues and members. After this, both the King and Edward his sonne, came to Londō with a great power, MarginaliaThe king kept out of London. 40. dayes by the Barons and Citizens.but yet were kept out of the city, by the Barons and Citizens, for the space of 40. dayes. And Octobonus the Legate (who for feare was fled into the Tower) they narowly layd for, that he shoulde not escape. At length by the intreaty of the Earle of Gloucester and other Earles that were his friendes, both the Barons and Cittizens were pardoned, and admitted to the kinges fauour. And 4. Byshops and 8. other noble men were chosen, such as were at Couentry first nominated: that they should order and dispose all matters betweene the King and suche as had lost theyr inheritaunce, as also the forme of theyr peace and raunsome. MarginaliaA peace cōcluded betweene the Barons and the kyng.And proclamation was made vppon the feast of all Sainctes, of perfect peace and record throughout al the Realme.

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The 52. yeare of this king Henries raigue 8. daies after the feast of S. Martin, he held a parliament at Marlberge in the yeare of our Lord aboue recited: MarginaliaThe statutes of Marleberge.where by the aduise of wise and discrete men, & with all the consentes of the nobles, he ordeined and enacted diuers good and profitable statutes for the reformation and bettering of the state of the realme & execution of common iustice, which are called the statutes of Marleberge.

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MarginaliaA conuocation holden at London by Octobonus the popes legat.The same yeare vpon S. Gregoryes day, Octobonus the Legate called a Councell at London, where were fiue

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