Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. English ecclesiastical affairs 1330-6458. Anti-papal writers59. Quarrel among mendicants and universities60. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bannockburn

nr Stirling [Estriuallin], Scotland

OS grid ref: NS 816 917

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Blacklow Hill [Blakelow]

Leek Wootton, Warwickshire

OS grid ref: SP 287 675

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Dunstable

Bedfordshire

OS grid ref: TL 015 215

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Kings Langley

Hertfordshire

OS grid ref: TL 075 025

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Oxford

OS grid ref: SP 515 065

County town of Oxfordshire; university town

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
St Albans
S. Albones, Saint Albons
NGR: TL 155 075

Borough, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the Hundred of Cashio, Hertfordshire. 12.5 miles west-by-south from Hertford; 20 miles north-west-by-north from London. The town comprises the parish of St Alban, or the Abbey parish, and part of the parish of St Michael and St Peter, in the archdeaconry of St Albans, diocese of London

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
St Albans (Verulamium) [S. Albanes; S. Albons]

Hertfordshire

OS grid ref: TL 155 075

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Windsor
NGR: SU 967 768

A borough, market town and parish having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Ripplesmere, county of Berkshire. 20 mile east by north from Reading, 22.5 miles west by south from London. The castle, built by Henry I, occupies more than 12 acres of ground, comprising upper, lower and middle wards. A principal royal residence in Tudor times. The living [of the town] is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire, Diocese of Salisbury.

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
392 [369]

K. Edward 2. Peter Gaueston beheaded. Warre betweene England and Scotland.

being out of their handes, they afterward might seeke, and should not finde it.

MarginaliaPeter Gaueston beheaded.Briefly, in such sort he perswaded þe hearers, that forthwith he was brought out, and by common agreement beheaded in a place called Blakelow, whiche place in other storyes I finde to be called Gaueshed, but that name (as I thinke was deriued vpon this occasion, afterwarde. And thus he, that before had called the Earle of Warwicke the blacke dog of Ardeine, was thus by the sayd dog worowed as ye haue heard. &c. His carkas, the Dominicke Fryers of Oxford had in their Monastery interred the space of two yeares: MarginaliaThe corpes of Peter Gaueston buryed in the kinges Manor of Langley.but after that, the king caused the sayd carkas to be taken vpp and buryed within hys owne Mannour of Langley.

[Back to Top]

After this, great disturbance began to rise betwene the king and the Lords: 

Commentary  *  Close
The Despensers and the death of Edward II

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

who hauing their power lying about Dunstable, sent stout messenge vnto the king at London, to haue their former actes confirmed. Gilbert Earle of Gloucester the kinges nephew (who neyther did holde agaynst the king nor yet agaynst the Nobles) with the Byshops and Prelates of the Realme: went betweene both parties with great dilligēce, to make vnitie. At which time also came 2. Cardinals from Rome, with letters sent vnto them from the Pope. The Nobles aunswered to the message of the Cardinals, lying then at Saint Albans: that as touching themselues they shoulde be at all times welcome to them: MarginaliaThe Nobles of England cared not for the popes letters.But as touching their letters (forasmuche as they were men vnlettered, and onely brought vp in warre and feates of armes) therefore they cared not for seing the same. Then message was sent againe, that they would graunt at least but to speake with the popes legates, which purposely came for the intent to set quyet and vnitie in the Realme. MarginaliaThe Popes Legates not admitted of the Nobles of England.They aunswered agayne, that they had bishops both godly and learned, by whose counsayle they would be led only and not by any straungers, who knewe not the true cause of ther commotion. And therefore they sayd precisely, that they would no foreiners or alians to be doers in theyr busines, and affayres pertaining the realme. Yet notwithkāding, through the mediation of the Archbishop, and of the Erle of Gloucester: the matter at length was so takē vp, þt the Barons should restore to the king, or his attourny of S. Albans, all the treasure, horses, and iewels of the foresayd Gaueston taken at Newcastle, and so there requestes should be graunted. And so was the matter at time composed.

[Back to Top]

Shortly vpon the same, Isabell the Queene was deliuered of a fayre child at Windsore, whō Lewes the French kings sonne (the Queenes brother, with other Frenchmē there present) would to be called by the name of the French king: but the English Lordes were contrary, willing him to be called by the name of Edward hys father. At the birth of whiche Edward, great reioysing was through all the land, and especially the king his father so much ioyed therat: that he begon dayly more and more to forget the sorowe and remembrance of Gauestons death, and was after that more agreable to the will of his Nobles.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaAnno. 1312.Thus peace and concord betwene them began to be in a good towardnes: which more and more might haue ben confirmed in wearing out of time, had not Sathan the author and sower of discord, styrred vp hys instruments MarginaliaThe kyng ruled by foreine counsayle. (certain Frenchmen, Titiuyllars, and makebates about the kyng MarginaliaMakebates about the kyng.) which ceased not in carping and deprauing the Nobles, to inflame the kinges hatred & grudge agaynst them. By the exciting of whom, the old quarrels being renued a fresh, the king in his Parliament called vpon the same: began to charge the foresayd Barons and Nobles with sedion and rebellion, & for slaying Peter Gaueston. Neither were the nobles lesse stout agayne in defending theyr cause declaring that they in so doing had deserued rather thanke and fauour with the king then any displeasure, in vanquishing such a publique enemy of the Realme, who not onely had spoyled and wasted the kinges substaunce, but also raysed much disturbance in the realme. And for asmuch as they had begon with the matter to theyr so great labours & expenses: they wold proceed further, they sayd, not ceasing til they saw an end therof. To be short, great threates there were on both parts, and a fowle matter like to haue followed. MarginaliaMediation for making peace.But agayne through the dilligent mediation of the Queene, the Prelates, and the foresayd Earle of Gloucester: the matter was taken vp and brought to reconcilemēt vpon these conditions, that the Lords and Barons openly in Westminster hall shold humble themselues before the king, and aske pardon there of their doinges, and euerye man there to receaue a letter of the kings pardon, for their indemnitie, and assuraunce. MarginaliaThe king reconciled againe with his nobles. And so passed ouer that yeare, within the whiche yeare died Robert Winchelsey Archbishop of Canterbury. In whose roome, Thomas Cobhamwas elected by the king and church of Canterbury to succeede: but the Pope, cassating that election, placed Walter Reynald Bishop of worceter.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaAnno. 1313. What discord doth in a common weale.In the meane tyme, the Scots hearing this ciuill discord in the Realme, began to be busie, and to rebell of new through the meanes of Robert Bruis: MarginaliaThe Scottes rebel against the realme of England. who beyng chased out of Scotlād, by king Edward the first, as is aboue premised, into Norway, was now returned again into Scotlād: where he demeaned him in such sort to þe Lords there: that in short processe he was agayne made kyng of the Realme: And warred so strongly vppon them that tooke the kinges part: that he wanne from them many Castels and strong holds, and inuaded the borders of Englād. The K. hearing this, assembleth a great power, and by water entreth the Realm of Scotland. Agaynst whō he encountred Robert de Bruys with hys Scots at Estriuallin, where was fought a strong battayle: in the end wherof, the Englishmē were discomfited, MarginaliaEnglish men ouercome by the Scottes. & so egerly pursued by the Scots, that many of the Noble men were slayne, as the Earle of Gloucester, Syr Robert Clifford, Syr Edmund Maule with other Lords to the number of 42. & knights and Barons 227. besides men of name, which were taken prisoners: of common souldiours 10. thousād, or after the Scotish story 50. thousand slayne, After which time, sir Robert Bruis reigned as king of Scotland.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaPope Clement neuer sate in the sea of RomeAbout which time and in which yeare, dyed Pope Clement, who keeping in the realme of Fraunce, neuer came to the sea of Rome: after whose death the Papacie stoode voyde two yeares.

MarginaliaAnn. 1314.The Scots after this exalted with pride and fiercenes inuaded the realme of Englād so sore killing & destroying man, and woman, and child: that they came wyning & wasting the Northpartes as farre as to Yorke. MarginaliaMiserable death and famine in England.Besides thys, such dearth of victuals, and penury of all things so oppressed the whole land, suche moraine of sheepe and Oxen: as men were fayne to eate horseflesh, dogges, cattes, myse, and what els they coulde get. Moreouer, suche a price of corne followed withall, þt the king hardly had bread, for þe sustentation of his own houshold. Moreouer some there were þt stall children and did eate them, and many for lacke of victuall dyed. And yet all this amended not the king of hys euill liuing.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaA description of an horrible famine in the realm of England.The cause and origene of this great dearth was, partly the warres and dissention betwene them and the Scottes: wherby a great part of þe land was wasted. But the chiefest cause was, the vntemperate season of the yeare, which contrary to the common course, was so moyst wt aboundaunce of rayne: that the graine layd in the earth could haue no ripyng by heate of the sunne, nor grow to any nourishment. Wherby, they that had to eat, could not be satisfied with saturitie, but eftsoones were as hungry agayne. MarginaliaEx Chron. Tho. Wals. in vita Eduardi. 2.They that had nothing, were driuen to steale and rob: the riche were constrayned to auoyde and diminish theyr housholdes: the poore for famine died. And not so much for the want of vitayle which could not be gotten, as þe vnwholesomnes of þe same when it was taken, so consumed the people: that the quicke were not sufficient to bury the dead. For the corruption of the meates, by reasō of vnseasonablenes of the groūd, was so infectious: that many dyed of the flixe, many of hote feuers, diuers of the pestilence. And not onely the bodyes of men thereby were infected, but also the beastes by the putrifaction of the hearbs and grasse fel in as great a morain: so farforth, as the eating of flesh was suspect & thought cōtagious. A quarter of corne and salt, from the moneth of Iune to September grew from 30. s. vnto 40. s. The flesh of horses was then precious to the poore. Many were driuen to steale fat dogges and to eate them: some were sayde in secret corners to eate their owne children. Some would steale other mens children to kill them and eate them priuily. The prisoners and theeues that were in bandes, such as newly were brought in vnto them, for hunger fell vpon them, and tearing them in peeces did eate them halfe aliue Briefly, this extreme penury had extincted and consumed (as it was thought) the greatest part of the people of the land: had not the king by the statute of the Londiners geuē forth commaundement through all his land, that no corne shoulde at that tyme be turned to the making of drinke. Such a Lord is God, thus able to do where he is disposed to strike. And yet we miserable creatures, in our wealth and aboundaunce will not surcease dayly to prouoke hys terrible maiesty.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe Scottes driuen out of Ireland.But let vs returne to the order agayne of our story. After the Scottes had thus plagued miserably (as ye haue heard) the Realme of England: they inuaded also Ireland where they kept and cōtinued warre the space of 4. yeares. But in fine, the Irishmen (by ayd sent to them from England) quitte themselues so well: that they vanquished the

[Back to Top]
Scots
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield