Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. English ecclesiastical affairs 1330-6458. Anti-papal writers59. Quarrel among mendicants and universities60. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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Berwick
Barwicke
NGR: NU 00 0528

Not identified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Mechelen (Malines; Machlinia; Maclines) [Mackline; Macheline]

Flanders, Belgium

Coordinates: 51° 1' 0" N, 4° 28' 0" E

 
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Salisbury
NGR: SU 145 300

A city having separate civil jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Underditch, county of Wilts. 82 miles south-west by west from London. The city comprises the parishes of St Edmund, St Martin and St Thomas, in the jurisdiction of the Sub-Dean, and in the diocese of Salisbury, of which the city is the seat. The cathedral precinct is extra-parochial, and under the jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter. The living of St Edmund is a rectory not in charge; St Martin is a discharged rectory; and St Thomas a perpetual curacy.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Southampton
NGR: SU 425 130

A seaport, borough and market town; a county of itself, locally within the county of Hampshire. 75 miles south west by west from London. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, Holy Rood, St John and St Lawrence, and St Mary, and St Michael. All (except St Mary) in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Winchester. St Mary is a rectory in the precinct of the town and in the peculiar jurisdiction of the rector. All Souls and St John and St Lawrence are discharged rectories; Holy Rood and St Michael are discharged vicarages.

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Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

The reason for the use of this work of reference is that it presents the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take this reference as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Woodstock
NGR: SP 444 163

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally within the Liberty of the City of Oxford, county of Oxford. 8 miles north-north-west from Oxford. A civil parish, but ecclesiastically a chapelry of the rectory of Bladon, Archdeaconry and Diocese of Oxford.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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400 [376]

The Earle of Kent executed. The Q. with child. Syr Rog. Mortimer executed. Wars with Scots.

Scotland: with many other things more: to the great preiudice both of the Realm & discontentation of al the nobles and Barons for þe most part more then the old queene, syr Roger Mortimer, and the Bysh. of Ely. Who in such sorte ruled the rost, þt al the rest of the nobles & barons, cast with thēselues how best they might redresse & remedy the great inconueniences, þt vnto the realme by meanes of thē grew and happened. Wherupon the king & Queene and sir Roger Mortimer, MarginaliaA parliament at Salisbury.caused an other Parliament to be called at Salisbury, where the said syr Koger Mortimer was made Earle of March agaynst all the barons wils, to preuent & disapoynt the foresayd purpose of them, but the Erle Henry of Lancaster with others, woulde not be at the same: MarginaliaEarle Henry of Lancaster refuseth to come to the parliament. wherefore it was layd vnto theyr charges, that they went about to conspire the kinges death.

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And further, for that the king was as well vnder the gouernment of the Erle of Kent his vncle, as the Queene hys mother, and the Earle of March: & for that, they could not doe in all thinges as they listed for the sayd Earle the kinges vncle, who loued the king and the Realme: Enuie began to rise betweene the Earle Mortimer and him, and by Isabell the Queenes practise, he founde the meanes to perswade the king: that the Earle of Kent (to enioy the Crowne as next heyre vnto the king) went about to poyson him. MarginaliaThe Earle of Kent put to death giltles.Wherupon the king geuing light credite, caused his said vncle to be apprehended: & wtout answere making to his accusation & accusers, to be beheaded at Wichester, the third of October and 3. yeare of hys raigne. But þe iust iudgement of God not permitting suche odious crimes in him to be vnpunished nor vndetected, so in fine fell forthe: that Isabell the old Queene the kings mother, was found and vnderstood to be with childe by the sayd Mortimer. MarginaliaThe Queene with childe by sir Roger Mortimer. Complaynt hereof was made to the K. as also the killing of king Edward hys father, and of the conspiracy of hym against the Earle of Kent the kinges vncle before put to death: MarginaliaSir Roger Mortimer Earle of March arrained, condemned and put to execution.Whereupon diuers other articles layd agaynst hym and manifestly read in the court, he was araigned and indighted, and by verdit found gilty: hauing his iudgement as in cases of high treason, and suffered death accordingly at London, where vpon London bridge next vnto Spensers, his head obtayned a place. MarginaliaThe queene put in prison and so kept a long timeThe Queene hys mother also (by good aduise of hys counsell) was restrayned of her libertie, and within a certaine castell not permitted once to come abroad: Vnto whō the king her sonne, once or twise a yeare would resort and visite.

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MarginaliaThe birth of prince Edward.This yeare, Prince Edward was borne at Woodstock who in processe of tyme and yeares grew, to be a most valiaunt prince, and was before he dyed, accompted throughout the world the follower of chiualry.

MarginaliaThe expedition of king Edward into Scotland.After this, the king prepared an other army into Scotland in the yeare prefixed. But first he sūmoned king Dauid of Scotland, who had (in the last truce 4. yeares to cōtinue as you heard, his father then liuing) maryed the Lady Iane, sister to the king: termed Iane make peace, to doe his homage to the king but that he refused. Wherupon, not forgetting there withall the scoffing rymes, whiche dayly from that tyme of truce the Scots had in theyr mouthes: he did somuch that with an army well furnished, he entred Scotland by the riuer of Twede, for the Scottes had then the possession of þe town of Barwick: the Scottish Gigges & rimes were these. MarginaliaThe Scottish rimes.Long beards hartles, Paynted hoodes witles, Gay coates graceles, Makes England thriftles, To be short, MarginaliaK. Edward wasteth and destroyeth the realme of Scotlande.the king wasted the land, burnt, destroyed, & took townes and castels with small resistance or none: and the space of 6. monthes together did in that land what hym listed without any battaile offered to him. For the Kyng of Scots was but a child & not aboue they age of 15. yeares and wanted good captaines that should haue defended the realme: in so muche þt they were all fayne sauing those that kept in holdes for theyr defence to take the forrest of Godworth, & there kept to themselues so long as the king remained in Scotland: Who at length when he had sufficiētly wasted, and spoyled, & brent the same, returned toward Barwicke, MarginaliaBarwicke besieged and yeelded vp to the king. about the which he bent his siege, vowing not to remoue the same, till he had gotten the towne.

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The Scots that kept the same, after a certayn tyme and many assaultes made, were contented vpon certayne conditions to haue deliuered vp the towne: But that the King refused, vnles that all conditions set apart, they woulde wt bag and bagage depart. Whereupon they condescended to the king, that if by a certayne tyme they were not by the king of Scottes rescued, they would render vp the towne and with bag and bagage depart: & and so the time expired frustrate of all hope & rescue, at the day appointed they did. MarginaliaThe K. entreth the towne of Barwicke & appointeth the captaine therof.The king then entred the towne and taried there the space of 12. dayes: who after he had appointed sir Edward Bailew Captayn ouer the towne and leauing also behind himother Knightes, Squires, and Souldiors as well to keep the same as other holdes the king had conquered in Scotland and fronters therof: He returned with his people towardes London, permitting euery man to depart and go what way them liked.

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MarginaliaSir Rob. de Artois a noble man of Fraunce inciteth the K. to prosecute his title in Fraunce.Then sir Robert de Artoys, a Noble man of Fraunce, and which descended of the bloud royall, being in Englād with the king: ceased not oftentimes to aduertise the kyng and put him in memory of his good & right title to the inheritaunce of the crowne of Fraunce. 

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Edward III and Philip VI

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

This sir Robert, for a certayne displeasure that Phillip the French king tooke agaynst hym for a certayn plea which by hym was moued before the king: was fayne for the safegard of hys life to flee the Realme of Fraunce, and so came to the kinges Court. MarginaliaThe king deliberateth with his councell cōcerning the title of Fraunce.King Edward was not vnwilling at all to heare thereof, but took delight oftentimes to reason and debate that matter with him concerning his right, title, and inheritance to the crowne of France. But yet notwtstanding, he thought it not good to make any attempt therunto without aduised and circūspect counsaile, for that it contayned matter of no small, but most difficult importaunce: neyther yet he tooke it to deserue the fame eyther of wisedome or prowes to let so good a title dye, or so fit oportunitie to passe. Wherefore he calling together certayne of his counsayle, vsed their deliberate aduises touching the seriousnes of this matter. In fine, it was by them thought good, þt the king should send certayne Embassadours ouer to the Earle of Heynault, MarginaliaEmbassadors are sent to the Earle of Heynalt concerning the title. whose daughter he had maryed, as wel to heare hys aduise and counsell herein: as also of what friendes and ayde, by him & his meanes in this so great an expeditiō to be begon in the Empire, to him might be procured. The king hereunto cōdescendeth, & appointeth for this Embassage þe byshop of Lincolne with 2. other Barenets, and 2. Doctors: who in such speedy wise made theyr voyage, that in shorte space they returned agayne to the king with this answere MarginaliaThe Embassadours returne with answere frō the Erle that pleaseth the kyng.That not onely the Earle hys counsaile & aduise, should be herein prest to the king of England theyr maister, but also the whole coūtry of Heynault. And further for that to such an expedition as appertained he sayd, the prouince of Heynault was but a small matter to make accōpt of: he woulde procure for the king greater ayde & friendship in the Empire, as the Duke of Brabant his cousin Germaine, and a puissant Prince, the Duke of Guerles, the Archbishop of Colayne, the Marques of Iuliers. &c. which are all good men of warre, and able to make 10. thousand fighting men sayth he. Which aunswere well liked the king, and made him ioyous therof. MarginaliaK. Philip of France heareth of the kings purpose, and stayeth his viage of the Croisie.But this counsaile of the king as secret as it was, came to Phillip the French kinges eares: wherupon, he stayd the voiage of the Crosie whiche then he had in hand, sending forth countermaundes to stay the same, til he knew farther the purpose of the king of England.

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The king hereupon himselfe taketh shipping accompanyed as to a king appertained, and when he had consulted with all the foresayd Lords of the Empire in this matter and vnderstood theyr fidelitie: he made hys repayre to the Emperour at whose handes he was well intertayned & honorable receaued, whō the Emp. appointed to be his Liefetenant generall, MarginaliaK. Edwrrd assigned lieftenant Generall of the Empyre. hauing thereby more authoritie both to will & commaund such as for this his expedition he trusted vnto, and had made conuention with. This hearing Phillip, prepared his army and rigged hys nauy, that so soone as the K should enter into the dominiō of Fraunce, they also might enter into Englād, requiting like for like.

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The king of England, after the feast of S. Iohn Baptist, according to his purpose, prepared all thinges ready to such an expeditiō, MarginaliaThe first viage of kyng Edward into Fraunce.cōducting his army & gathering a greater strength in the Empire, as before to him was promised vsing the Emperours authoritie therein, as his lieftenant general, howbeit at the charge altogether of the K. of England. The French king as soone as king Edward, had landed his army at Mackline iu Flauders, and hearing of the defiance, which the king and other Noble men of the Empire had sent vnto him: Sent certaine ships lying ready therunto, and wayting for such oportunitie vppon the cost of England, did so much that vpon a Sonday, whilest the townes men were at the Church little looking for any such matter, entred the hauen of Southampton, MarginaliaSouthampton burnt of the French men.tooke the towne and spoyled the same, defloured maydens, enforced wiues, brent, kild, tooke captiues, and caryed away riche spoyles and great booties to theyr ships, and so agayn departed into Fraunce. Further, as the king of Englād had allied himselfe with the noble men of the Empire, and had the friendly fauour of the Emperour also therunto: so the French king made the like league and aliance with Dauid the king of Scots, whom the king had so hardly delt with all in Scotland (as partly before you had) and kept the most part of Scotland vnder hys subiection: Binding the

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