Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. English ecclesiastical affairs 1330-6458. Anti-papal writers59. Quarrel among mendicants and universities60. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bristol
Bristoll, Brystoll, Bristow, Bristowe
NGR: ST 590 730

A city and county of itself, between the counties of Gloucester and Somerset. 34 miles south-west by south from Gloucester, 12 miles north-west from Bath. Bristol is the seat of a diocese, established in 1542. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Augustine, Christ Church, St. Owen, St. John Baptist, St. Leonard, St. Mary le Port, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Michael, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Werburgh, St. Stephen and St. Thomas. Also the Temple parish, and parts of St. James, St. Paul, St. Philip and St. Jacob. All are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the bishop. Christ Church, St. John Baptist, St. Mary le Port, St. Michael, St. Peter, St. Stephen and St. Werburgh are discharged rectories. St. Leonard, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Nicholas, The Temple, St. Philip and St. Jacob are discharged vicarages. St. James and St. Thomas are perpetual curacies, the latter annexed to the vicarage of Bedminster, Archdeaconry of Bath, Diocese of Bath and Wells.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Calais

[Calyce; Calice; Calis; Callis]

Pas-de-Calais, France

Coordinates: 50° 56' 53" N, 1° 51' 23" E

 
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Canterbury
Cant., Canterb., Canterbury, Caunterbury, Caunterburye,
NGR: TR 150 580

An ancient city and county of itself, having separate jurisdiction. Locally in the hundred of Bridge and Petham, lathe of St. Augustine, eastern division of the county of Kent. 26 miles south-east by east from Rochester. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Alphege, St. Andrew, St. George, The Holy Cross, St. Margaret, St. Martin, St. Mary Bredman, St. Mary Bredin, St. Mary Magdalene, St. Mary Northgate, St. Mildred, St. Peter and St. Paul, all in the Diocese of Canterbury, and with the exception of St. Alphege and St. Martin within the Archdeaconry of Canterbury. The living of All Saints is a rectory with St. Mary in the Castle and St. Mildred attached; St. Alphege is a rectory exempt, united with the vicarage of St. Mary Northgate; St. Andrew is a rectory with St. Mary Bredman annexed; St. George is a rectory with St. Mary Magdalene annexed; St. Martin's is a rectory exempt with St. Paul's annexed; St. Peter's is a rectory with Holy Cross annexed; St. Mary Bredin is a vicarage; and St. Margaret's is a donative in the patronage of the Archdeacon

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Chichester
Chichester
NGR: SU 862 053

A city having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Box and Stockbridge, rape of Chichester, county of Sussex. 62 miles south-west by south from London. Chichester is the seat of the diocese, and comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Andrew, St. Martin, St. Olave, St. Pancras, St. Peter the Great, St. Peter the Less, St. Bartholomew without and the Cathedral Precinct. The livings, with the exception of All Saints, are all in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter. The living of All Saints is a discharged rectory, as are St. Andrew, St. Martin, St. Olave, St. Peter the Less, St. Bartholomew and St. Pancras. St. Peter the Great is a discharged vicarage

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Hull (Kingston-upon-Hull)

East Riding of Yorkshire

OS grid ref: TA 095 295

 
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Lincoln
NGR: SK 975 715

A city and county of itself, locally in the county of Lincoln, of which it is the chief town. Seat of the Bishopric of Lincoln. 132 miles north by west from London. Lincoln formerly contained 52 parish churches, of which 34 were destroyed prior to the reign of Edward VI. It comprises the parishes of St Benedict, St Botolph, St John Newport, St Margaret in the Close, St Mark, St Martin, St Mary Wigford, St Mary Magdalene, St Michael on the Mount, St Nicholas Newport, St Paul in the Bail, St Peter at Arches, St Peter in eastgate, St Peter at Gowte, and St Swithin; all in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Lincoln. Of which St Mary Magdalene, St Paul in the Bail and St .Peter at Arches are discharged rectories; St Mary Wigford is a discharged vicarage; St John Newport is a vicarage not in charge; and the remainder are perpetual curacies.

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Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

 
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Oxford

OS grid ref: SP 515 065

County town of Oxfordshire; university town

 
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Woodstock
NGR: SP 444 163

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally within the Liberty of the City of Oxford, county of Oxford. 8 miles north-north-west from Oxford. A civil parish, but ecclesiastically a chapelry of the rectory of Bladon, Archdeaconry and Diocese of Oxford.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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417 [393]

K. Edward. 3. A great commotion in Oxford. The Popes messengers hanged.

gies graūted by popes to the Friers, to intermedle in matters of Parish churches: As to heare confessiōs, to preach and teach, with power thereto annexed to gather for theyr labor, to bury within their houses, and to receiue impropriations, &c. because it were long here to describe the full circumstances therof, also because the sayd contention dyd endure a long time not onely in fraūce but also came ouer to englād: The whole discourse therof more ample (Christ willing) shalbe declared in the beginning of the next booke folowing, when we come to the story of Armachanus.

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About what time & yere, this brawle was in the Vniniuersity of Paris betwene the Friers and Prelats there, as hath bene declared: the like contētion happened also in the vniuersity of Oxford MarginaliaA seditious commotion betweene the townes men and the scholers in the vniuersitie of Oxforde. in the yeare aboue prefixed. 1354. saue onely that the strife amōg the maisters of Paris as it rose vpon Frierly ceremonies, so it went no farther, then brawling wordes and matter of excōmunication: but this tumult rising of a dronken cause, proceeded further vnto bloudy stripes. The first originall wherof began in a tauerne, betwene a scholer & the good man of the house. Who falling together in altercatiō, grew to such heat of words, that the student (contrarius hospitij) poured the wine vpon the head of the host and brake his head with the quart pot. Vpon this occasion geuen, eftsoones parts began to be taken betwene townes men & the scholers. In somuch that a grieuous sedition & conflict folowed vpō the same: wherin many of the townes men were wounded, & to the number of 20. slayn. Diuers also of the scolers grieuously hurt. The space of 2. dayes this hurly burly continued. Vpon the second day, certain religious and deuout persōs ordeined a solemne processiō general, to pray for peace. MarginaliaProcession for peace. Yet notwithstanding, all þt procession as holy as it was, it would not bring peace. MarginaliaThe holie procession would bring no peace. In the which procession (the skirmish stil waxing hoat) one of the studentes being hardly pursued by the townesmen, for succour in his flight, came running to the Priest or Frier, which caried about (as the maner was) the pixe: thinking to finde refuge at the presēce of the transubstātiated God of the aultar there caried & inboxed. Notwithstanding, the God there not presēt, or els not seing him, or els peraduēture being a sleepe: the scholer foūd there small helpe. MarginaliaTransubstātiation will not helpe in time of need For the townesmen in the heate of the chase, forgetting belike the vertue of the popes transubstnūtiation, folowed him so hard, that in the presēce of the pixe they brake his head, & woūded him greuously. This done, at length some peace or truce for that day was taken. The next morow folowing, other townesmē in the villagies about, ioyning with the townesmē of Oxford: confederated together in great force and power to set vpon the studētes there, and so did, hauing a black flag borne before thē, and so inuaded the Vniuersity men. Wherupō, the scholers being ouermatched & compelled to flee into their haules and hostles, were so pursued by theyr enemies, that 20. of the doores of their haules and chambers were broke open, & many of them wounded, and (as it is sayd) slain and throwen into priuies: their books with kniues and bils cut all in pieces, and much of theyr goods caried away. MarginaliaA conquest of the scholers of Oxforde. And thus the studentes of that Vniuersity being conquered by the townesmen of Oxford, and of the country about, departed & left the vniuersity. So that for a time, the scholes there, and all schole acts did vtterly cease from all exercise of study, except onely Mertō Colledge haule, with a few other remayning behinde. MarginaliaThe vniuersitie of Oxford dissolued for a tyme.

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This being done the 12. day of February, the Queene at the same time being at Woodstock, was brought to bed, and purified on the first Sonday in Lent with great solēnity of Iusting: About which time, the Bishop of Lincoln their Diocesane hearing of this excessiue outrage, sendeth his inhibition to all Parsons and Priestes, forbidding thē throughout all Oxford, none to celebrate Masse or any diuine seruice in the presence of any lay persō within the said Towne of Oxford, interdicting withal the whole Town. MarginaliaThe towne of Oxford interdicted. Which interdiction endured the space of a whole yere and more.

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The king also sēt thether his Iustices to examine and enquire of the matter. Before whom diuers lay men & of the clergy were indicted. And foure of þe chiefe burgeses of the sayd towne were indicted, & by the kinges commaundement sent to the tower of London, were there imprisoned. At length through much labor of the nobles, the king so tooke vp the matter, that sending his writings vnto all Shiriffes in England, offered pardō to all & singular stu-dents of that Vniuersity, (wheresoeuer dispersed) for that transgression, Whereby the Vniuersity in short time was replenished againe as before. Moreouer was graunted to the Vicechauncellor or Commissary (as they terme him) of the towne and Vniuersity of Oxford, MarginaliaGraunted to the Commissary of Oxford to haue the assise of bread and ale and other priuilegies aboue the Maior of the towne.to haue the assise of bread, ale, wine, and all other victuals, the Maior of the sayd town being excluded. Also was graūted and decreed, that þe commōs of Oxford should geue to the vniuersity of Oxford 200. pound sterling in part of satisfaction for theyr excesses: reserued notwithstanding to euery one of the students his seuerall action agaynst any seuerall person of þe townesmen. &c.

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About the yeare of our Lord. 1354. The king with the consent of his counsell, reuoked home agayne out of flaūders the staple of Wolle, with all things thereunto appertayning, & stablished the same in sondry places within the realme, namely in Westminster. Canterbury, Chichester, Bristow, Lincolne, and in Hulle. Which Staple after an. 1362. was translated ouer into Calice.

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Of Simon Islip Archbishop of Canterb. mentioned a litle before, pag. 363. I read in the said author aboue specified, that he by his letters patent directed to al parsons & vicars within his prouince: MarginaliaAn holsome decree of a good Archb. not to abstaine from bodely labour vpon certaine holy dayes.straitly charged them & theyr Parishioners vnder payne of excōmunication, not to abstaine frō bodely labor, vpō certaine Saints dayes, which before were wont to be hallowed & consecrated to vnthrifty idlenes. Item, that to Priests should be geuen no more for their yearely stipend, but 3. pound 6. s. 8. pence, whiche made diuers of them to robbe and steale. &c. an. 1362. The next yeare following, which was 1363. the foresayd Kyng Edward kept his Parliament at London in the month of October: MarginaliaA parliament. wherin was prohibited, no gold nor siluer to be worne in kniues, girdles, brooches, ringes, or in any other ornament belonging to the body, except the wearer might dispend 10, poūd by yeare. Itē, that none should weare either silks or costly furres, except such as might dispēd 100 pound by yeare. Also that Marchaunt venterers should not export ouer any marchaūdise out of the realme, or seek for wines in other country: wherby other nations should be constrayned rather to seeke to vs. &c. But none of thys did take any great effect.

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After this Simon Islip as is aboue recorded, folowed Simon Langham, then W. Wittelesey, after whome next in the place succeeded Simon Sudbury. MarginaliaSimon Sudbury Archb. of Cant.

Much about the same time, the Nunnes of S. Bridgits order began first. MarginaliaThe Nuns of S. Bridges order. About which time also was builded the Queenes Colledge in Oxford, by Queene Philippe of England, wife to king Edward the third Circa annum domini. 1360.

Moreouer in the time of this Pope Innocent, Fryer Iohn Lyle Bishop of Ely, moued with certaine iniuries (as he thought) done to him by the Lady Blanche, MarginaliaThis Ladye Blanch was Duchesse of Lancaster. made his complaynt to the Pope. Who sending down his curse to the Bishop of Lincolne, and other Prelates to be executed vpon the aduersaries of the Bishoppe of Ely: commaunded them, that if they did know any of the sayd aduersaries dead and buried (that notwithstanding) they should cause the same to be taken vp: MarginaliaDead men excommunicated by the Pope. which also they performed accordingly, of whom some had bene of the Kings counsell. Wherefore the king being displeased and not vnworthely, did trouble and molest agayn the sayd Prelats. This comming to the Popes hearing, certayne were directed downe from the court of Rome, in the behalf of the foresayd Bishop of Elye: who meeting, with the Byshop of Rochester the kinges treasurer, deliuered vnto him being armed, letters from the Bishop of Rome, the tenour wherof was not known. Which done, they incontinent auoyded away. But certayne of the kinges seruaunts pursuing, did ouertake them: of whom some they imprisoned, some they brought to the iustices, and so were condemned to be hanged. MarginaliaThe Popes messengers hanged. Wherein may appeare what reuerence the Popes letters in this kinges dayes had in this realme of England. Ex Chro. Walsing. This Pope Innocēt ordeined the feast of the holy speare, and of the holy nayles. MarginaliaThe feast of the speare and of the holy nailes.And here to make an end of this fourth booke, now remayneth after our order and custome before begunne, to prosecute the race of the Archbishops of Canterbury, in this foresayd fourth booke conteined, beginning where before we left, pag. 170. at Lancfrancus. 

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Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

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