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830 [806]

K. Hen. 8. The history, life, and persecution of Ric. Hunne. A description of Lolards Tower.

entrap and bring him within the danger of their own cruell lawes: MarginaliaThe despitefull demeanor of the popes holy catholikes to be noted. and therupon making secret and diligent inquistion, & seeking al corners they could against him, at lēgth they found a means how to accuse him of heresie vnto Richard Fitziames then Bishop of London, and so did: 

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This statement assumes that the clergy only charged Hunne with heresy because of the praemunire suit. The opposite could also be true: that Hunne initiated the suit, as pre-emptive strike, because he suspected that heresy charges might be brought against him.

Who (desirous to satisfie the reuenging and bloudy affection of his chaplaynes) caused thereupon him to be apprehended, MarginaliaRic. Hunne cōmitted to the Lollardes tower.and cōmitted vnto prison within the Lolards Tower at Paules, so that none of his freendes might be suffered to come to hym. Thus Richard Hunne being clapt in the Lolards Tower, shortly after, at the earnest instigation of one Doctour Horsey the Bishops Chauncelour (a man more ready to prefer the Clergies cruell tyrannie, then the truth of Christes Gospel) was brought before the Bishop at his manour of Fulham, the second day of December, in the yeare before mentioned: where within his Chappell he examined him vpon these Articles following, collected against him by the said Horsey and his complices.

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MarginaliaThe Articles obiected against Richard Hunne.First, that he had read, taught, preached, published, and obstinately defended, against the lawes of almighty God: that tythes, or payeng of tythes was neuer ordeined to be due, sauing onely by the couetousnesse of priestes.

2 Item, tht he had read, taught, preached, published, and obstinately defended: tht Bishops and Priestes be the Scribes and Pharisees that did crucifie Christ, and damned him to death.

3 Item, that he had read, taught, preached, &c. that Byshops and Priests be teachers and preachers, but no doers, neyther fulfillers of the law of God, but catching, rauening, and all things taking, and nothing ministring, neither geuing.

4 Item, where and when one Ioanne Baker was detected aud abiured of many great heresies (as it appeareth by her abiuration) the sayd Richard Hunne sayd, published, taught, preached, and obstinately tooke vpon him, sayeng, that he would defend her and her opinions, if it cost him fyue hundred markes.

5 Item, afterwards (where and when the sayd Ioanne Baker after her abiuration, was enioyned open penance according to her demerites) the sayd Richard Hunne saide, published, taught, and obstinately did defend her, sayeng: the Byshop of London and his officers haue done open wrong to the sayde Ioanne Baker, in punishing her for heresie: for her sayengs and opinions be according to the lawes of God: Wherefore the Byshop and hys officers are more woorthie to bee punished for heresie, then she is.

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6 Item, that the sayd Richard Hunne hath in his keeping diuers English bookes, prohibited and damned by the lawe: as the Apocalyps in English, Epistles and Gospels in English, Wickliffes damnable workes, and other bookes conteining infinite errours, in the which he hath bene long time accustomed to reade, teach,aand study dayly. 

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Detailed evidence on this point was presented at Hunne's posthumous trial for heresy; see John Fines, 'The Post-Mortem Condemnation for Heresy of Richard Hunne', EHR 78 (1963), pp. 530-1.

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Particular answeare vnto these seuerall obiections, in the Register I finde none, sauyng that next vnder them, there is written in his name with a contrarye hande, these words folowing: MarginaliaThis aunswere smelleth of forging & crafty packing.As touching these Articles, I haue not spoken them as they be heere layd: Howbeit, vnaduisedly I haue spoken wordes somewhat sounding to the same: for the which I am sory, and aske God mercy, and submit me vnto my Lords charitable and fauourable correction. Which they affirme to be written with Hunnes owne hand: but how likely to truth that is, let the discrete wisedome of the reader indifferently iudge by the whole sequele of this proces. MarginaliaArguments and reasons prouing this aunswere not to be of R. Hunne.And further, if it were his owne act, what occasion then had they so cruelly to murther him as they did? seeing he had already so willingly confessed his fault, and submitted himselfe vnto the charitable and fauourable correction of the Bishop (for the which euen by their owne lawe, in cases of most heynous heresie, he ought to be againe receiued and pardoned, (except perhaps they will account horrible murther, to be but the Bishops fauourable correction. Againe it seemeth they had very few credible witnesses to proue certainely that this was his answeare and handwriting: for the Register, or some other for him (appointed to record the same) hath certified it, as of hearesay from others, and not of his own proper sight and knowledge, as the words noted in the margent of the booke, adioining to the foresaid answeare, plainely do declare, which are these: Hoc fuit scriptum manu propria Richardi Hunne, vt dicitur. Now if he had had any sure ground to stablish this certificate, I doubt not, but he would (in steede of, vt dicitur) haue registred the names of the assistants at the time of his examination, (which he confesseth to be many) as generally they do in all their actes, especially in cases of heresie, as they tearme it. But how scrupulous those good fellowes that spared not so shamelesly to murther him, woulde be to make a lie of him that was already dead, let (as I said) the indifferent iudgement of the godly wise discerne.

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MarginaliaRicharde Hunne sent backe a gaine to Lollardes tower.This examination ended, the Bishop sent him backe againe the same day, vnto the Lolardes tower: and then by the appointment of Doctour Horsey his Chauncelour, he was colourably committed from the custody of Charles Ioseph the Sumner, vnto Iohn Spalding the belringer, a man, by whose simplenes in wit (though otherwise wicked) the subtill Chauncelour thought to bring his diuelish pretended homicide the easlier to passe: which most cruelly he did by his ministers suborned, within two nights then next folowing accomplish: as is plainely proued hereafter by the diligent inquirie and finall verdict of þe Crowner of

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¶ A description of the Lolards tower, where M. Rich. Hunne was first murthered, then by the sayd parties hanged, afterward condemned of heresie, and at last burned in Smythfield.
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This woodcut shows the body of Hunne hanging to the left of the cell, while his killers exit: one of them is depicted blowing out a candle, placed on the stocks, as he leaves. This scene illustrates the belief of many (including Foxe) that Hunne was murdered. The coroner's inquest into Hunne's death (reprinted by Foxe) reported that 'an ende of a wax candel ... we found sticking upon the stockes fayre put out, about seven or eight foote from the place where Hunne was hanged, which candle after our opinion was never put out by him.' (1563, p.391.) CUL copy: this image contains some detail added in ink. The man blowing out the candle wears a blue tunic with yellowy-orange hose. The next man is in black with pink sleeves; the other is in purple. Note that there is considerable bleed through on the right of this image. WREN copy: the outfits are more muted in this copy: Hunne is in blue, with purple hose, but the perpetrators are in dark, charcoal colours, almost blending into the background, making the image appear altogether much more sinister.

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