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Oppenheim am Rhein [Oppenhime]
 
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Oppenheim am Rhein [Oppenhime]

Mainz-Bingen, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany

Coordinates: 49° 51' 20" N, 8° 21' 37" E

877 [853]

K. Henry. 8. The history of Luther. Luther outlawed by Charles the Emperour.

would haue hym, so they grounded with authority of holy Scripture: otherwise he woulde not consent to doe any thing. For God sayth by his Prophet (sayth he) Trust ye not in Princes, nor in the childrē of men, in whom there is no health. 

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Psalm 146: 3.

Also, Cursed be he that trusteth in man. 
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Jeremiah 17: 5.

And seeing that they did vrge him more vehemently, he auswered: We ought to yeld no more to þe iudgement of men, thē the word of God doth suffer. So they departed, and prayed him to aduise for better answere, and sayd, they would returne after dinner.

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After dinner they returned, exhorting him as before, but in vayne. They prayed him, that at the least he woulde submit his writing to the iudgement of the nexte generall Councell. Luther agreed therunto, but with this conditiō, MarginaliaLuthers cōdition.that they themselues shoulde present the Articles collected out of his bookes to be submitted to the Councell in suche sort, as notwithstanding the sentence awarded by the coūcell, should be authorised by the Scripture, and confirmed with the testimonyes of the same.

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MarginaliaFalse witnesse.They then leauing Luther, departed, and reported to the Archbishop of Triers, that he had promised to submit his writings in certayne articles to the next Councell, & in the meane space he woulde keepe silence, which Luther neuer thought: who neither with admonitions, ne yet manaces could be induced to deny or submit his bookes to the iudgementes of menne (he had so fortified hys cause wyth cleare and manifest authorityes of the Scripture) vnlesse they could proue by sacred scripture, and apparant reasōs to the contrary.

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MarginaliaThe prouidēce of God.It chaunced then by the speciall grace of God, that the Archbishop of Triers sent for Luther, thinking presently to heare him. And when he perceiued otherwise then Peutinger, and the Doctour of Bade had tolde him, he sayde, that he would for no good, but that he had heard himselfe speake: for els he was euen now going to the Emperor, to declare what the Doctors had reported.

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MarginaliaFamiliar talke betweene the archbishop and Luther.Then the Archbishop entreated Luther, and conferred with him very gently, first remouing such as were presēt, as well of the one side as of the other. In this conference Luther concealed nothing from the Archbishop, affirming that it was daūgerous to submit a mtter of so great importaunce to them, who after they had called hym vnder safeconduct, attempting him with new commaundementes, had condemned his opinion, and approued the Popes Bull.

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Moreouer, the Archbishop bidding a frend of his draw nigh required Luther to declare what remedy might bee ministred to helpe this. Luther answered: there was no better remedy then suche as Gamaliel alledged in the fyfte chapter of the Apostles, Marginalia

Luthers prophecie out of Gamaliell.

Act. 5.

as witnesseth S. Luke, saying: If this Councell or this woorke proceede of men, it shall come to nought, but if it be of God, ye can not destroy it. 
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Acts 5: 38-39.

And so he desired that the Emperour might be aduertised to write the same to the Pope, that he knewe certaynely if this his enterprise proceeded not of God, it would be abolished within three, yea within two yeares.

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The Archbishop enquired of him what he would do, if certayne articles were taken out of his bookes, to be submitted to the generall councell. Luther aunswered, so that they be not those, which the counsell of Constance condemned. The Archbyshoppe sayd, I feare they will be the very same: but what then? Luther replyed, MarginaliaLuthers cōstancie.I will not, nor I cannot holde my peace of such, for I am sure by theyr decrees the word of God was condemned: therefore I wyll rather loose head and life, then abandon the manifest word of my Lord God.

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Then the Archbishop seing Luther would in no wise geue ouer the word of God, to the iudgement of men, gētly bade Luther farewell, who at that instaunt prayed the Archbishop to entreat the Emperours maiesty to graunt him gracious leaue to depart. He aunswered, he woulde take order for him, and speedely aduertise hym of the Emperours pleasure.

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Within a small while after, Iohn Eckius the Archbyshops officiall, in the presence of the Emperours Secretary, who had bene Maximilians Chauncellour, sayde vnto Luther in his lodging, by the commaundement of the Emperour: that since he had bene admonished diuersly of the Emperiall maiesty, the Electors, Princes and estates of the Empyre, and that notwithstanding he woulde not returne to vnity and concord, there remained that the Emperour as aduocate of the Catholique fayth should proceed further: MarginaliaLuther sent home from the counsel.and that it was the Emperours ordinaunce that he should within 21. dayes, returne boldly vnder safeconduct, and be safely garded to the place whence he came, so that in the meane while he styrred no commotion amonge the people in his iourney, either in conference, or by preaching.

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Luther hearing this, aunswered very modestly, & christianly: euen as it hath pleased God, so is it come to passe, the name of the Lord be blessed. He sayde further, he thanked most humbly the Emperors maiesty, and all the Princes and estates of the Empyre, that they had geuen to hym benigne and gracious audience, and graunted safe conduct to come and returne. Finally he sayd, he desired none other of them, then a reformation, according to the sacred word of God, and consonancy of holy Scriptures, which effectually in his hart he desired: Otherwise he was prest to suffer all chaūces for the Emperiall maiesty, as life and death, goodes, fame, and reproch, reseruing nothing to himselfe, but the onely word of God, which he would constantly confesse, to the latter end, humbly recommending hym to the Emperours maiesty, and to all the Princes and other estates of the sacred Empyre.

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MarginaliaLuthers departure from Wormes.The morow after, which was the 26. day of Aprill, after he had taken his leaue of such as supported him, and other his beneuolent frends, that often times visited hym, and had broken hys fast, at tenne of the clocke he departed from Wormes, accompanyed with such as repayred thyther with him, hauing space of time limited vnto him, (as is sayd) for 21. dayes, and no more. 

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Luther had twenty-one days to reurn home. During that time he was protected by the Imperial safe conduct; after that period he was at the mercy of the local authorities.

The Emperours Heralde Casper Sturme, folowed and ouertooke him at Oppenhime, being commaunded by the Emperour to cōduct him safely home.

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¶ The vsuall prayer of Martin Luther.

COnfirme (O God) in vs that thou hast wrought, and perfect the worke that thou hast begunne in vs, to thy glory. So be it. Ex histor. Phil. Melancth. Ex Sledano. Ex Parali. Abb. Vrsperge. &cex Casp. Peucero.

MArtin Luther thus being 

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Foxe's account of all the events below, down to and including Henry VIII's attack on Luther, is drawn from Sleidan's Commentaries. (See Johannes Sleidan, A famouse cronicle of our time, called Sleidanes Commentaries, translated John Daus [London, 1560], STC 19848, fos. 31v-34v.

dismissed of the Emperour, according to the promise of his safeconduct made (as you haue heard) departed from Wormes toward his countrey the 26: of Aprill, accompanied with the Emperours Heraulde, and the rest of his company, hauing onely xxi. dayes to him graunted for his returne, and no more. 
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Luther had twenty-one days to reurn home. During that time he was protected by the Imperial safe conduct; after that period he was at the mercy of the local authorities.

In the which meane space of his returne, MarginaliaLuther in his iourney wryteth to the Emperour and nobles of Germany.hee writeth to the Emperour, and to other nobles of the Empyre repeating briefely to them the whole action and order of things there done, desiring of them, theyr lawfull good will and fauour, which as he hath alwayes stand neede of, so now he moste earnestly craueth, especially in this, that hys cause whiche is not his but the cause of the whole church vniuersall, may be hearde with indifferency and equitye, and may be decised by the rule and authority of holy Scripture: signifying moreouer, that when so euer they shall please to send for him, he shall bee ready at theyr commaundement, at any time or place, vppon theyr promise of safety, to appeare. &c.

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MarginaliaThe doctors of Paris condemne the bookes of Luther.During the time of these doinges, the Doctours and Schoolmen of Paris, were not behinde with theyr partes, but to shew theyr cunning, condemned the bookes of Luther, extracting out of the same, especially out of hys booke De Captiuitate Babilonica, certayne Articles as touching the Sacramentes, lawes and decrees of the Church equalitye of workes, vowes, contrition, absolution, satisfaction, Purgatory, free will, priuiledges of holy Church, coūcelles, punishment of heretiques, Philosophye, Schole diuinity, with other more. MarginaliaPhilip Melancton answereth the Parisians.Vnto whom Philip Melancton maketh aunsweare, and also Luther himselfe, albeit pleasantly and iestingly.

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MarginaliaLuther outlawed by the Emperour.It was not long after this, but Charles the new Emperour, to purchase fauor with the Pope (because hee was not yet confirmed in his Empyre) prouideth and directeth out a solemne writ of outlawry agaynst Luther, & all them that take his part, commaunding the said Luther, where so euer he might be gotten, to be apprehended, and his bookes burned. By which decree proclaymed agaynst Luther, the Emperour procured no small thanke with the Pope: in so much that the Pope ceasing to take part with the French king, ioyned himselfe whollye to the Emperour. MarginaliaM. Luther kept a side for a whileIn the meane time Duke Fridericke, to geue some place for the time to the Emperors Proclamation, conueyed Luther a litle out of sight secretly, by the helpe of certain noble men, whom he well knew to be faythfull and trusty vnto him in that behalfe. There Luther being close and out of company, wrote diuers Epistles, and certayne bookes also vnto his frendes among which he dedicated one to his companye of Augustine Fryers, entituled, MarginaliaLuthers booke De Abroganda Missa ad Augustinenses.De abroganda Missa, Which Friers the same time being encouraged by him, beganne first to lay downe theyr priuate Masses. Duke Fridericke fearing least that would breede some great styrre or tumult, caused the censure and iudgementes of the whole

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