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K. Henry. 8. The death of Luther. His miraculous life. Cardinall Campeius.

the vniuersall Bishop and Gods mighty Vicare in earth: to withstand all his Cardinals: yea and to susteine the malice and hatred almost of the whole worlde, being set against him: and to worke that against the said Pope, Cardinals and Church of Rome, which no King nor Emperour could euer do, yea durst neuer attempt, nor all the learned men before him, could euer compasse. MarginaliaA notable miracle of God to ouerthrow the Pope by a poore Fryer.Which miraculous worke of God, I recount nothing inferiour to the miracle of Dauid ouerthrowing great Goliath. Wherfore if miracles do make a Sainct (after the Popes definition) what lacketh in Martin Luther but age and tyme only to make him a Sainct? who standing openly against the Pope, Cardinals, and prelates of the Church, in number so many, in power so terrible, in practise so craftie, hauing Emperours, and all the Kings of the earth against him, who teaching and preaching Christ the space of nine and twenty yeares, could without touch of all his enemies so quietly in his owne countrey, where he was borne, die and sleepe in peace. MarginaliaThree miracles noted in M. Luther.In the which Martin Luther, first to stand against the Pope, was a great miracle: to preuaile against the Pope, a greater: so to die vntouched, may seme greatest of all, especially hauing so many enemies as he had. Againe, neither is it any thing lesse miraculous, to consider what manifold dangers he escaped besides, 

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We have been unable to find the source for the stories of of these two interesting 'miraculous' escapes of Luther from death. Foxe may have heard them from an oral source; perhaps a sermon.

as when a certeine Iewe was appointed to come to destroy him by poison, yet was it so the will of God, that Luther had warning thereof before, and the face of the Iewe sent to him by picture, whereby he knew him, and auoided the perill.

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MarginaliaM. Luther miraculously preserued.Another time as he was sitting in a certaine place vpon his stoole, a great stone there was in the vault, ouer hys head where he did sit, which being stayd miraculously, so long as he was sitting, as soone as he was vp, immediatly fell vpon the place where he sate, able to haue crushed him all in peeces if it had light vpon him.

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MarginaliaM. Luther vehemēt & mighty in prayer.And what should I speake of his praiers, which were so ardent vnto Christ, that (as Melancthon writeth) 

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This is taken from Johannes Sleidan, A famouse cronicle of our time, called Sleidanes Commentaries, trans. John Daus (London, 1560), STC 19894, sig. G8v.

they which stoode vnder his windowe, where he stood prayeng, might see his teares falling and dropping downe. Againe, with such power he prayed, that he (as himselfe confesseth) had obteined of the Lord, that so long as he liued, the Pope should not preuaile in his countrey: after his death (sayd he) let them pray who could.

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MarginaliaA miraculous worke of the Lorde in deliuering a young man out of the deuils daunger by Christian prayer.And as touching the maruelous workes of the Lorde, wrought heere by men, if it be true which is credibly reported by the learned, 

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Who these 'learned' sources were cannot be determined. There were numerous stories current in the sixteenth century of Luther's successful confrontations with the devil; this appears to be one of them. (Luther's inveterate adversary and first biographer, Johannes Cochlaeus, caustically referred to the prevalence of such stories: Historia de actis et scriptis Martini Lutheri (Paris, 1565), pp. 302-3). For a discussion of the contemporary legends of Luther and Satan see Robert Scribner, 'Luther Myth: Historiography of the Reformers' in Popular Culture and Popular Movements in Germany (London, 1987), pp. 301-22, esp. 304-5.

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what miracle can be more miraculous, then that whiche is declared of a yong man aboute Wittenberge, who being kept bare and needy by his father, was tempted by way of sorcery, to bargaine with the Diuell, or a familiare (as they call him) to yeeld hymselfe body and soule into the Diuels power, vpon condition to haue his wish satisfied with money: So that vpon the same, an obligation was made by the yong man, written with his owne bloud, and geuen to the Diuell. This case you see, how horrible it was, and how damnable: now heare what followed. Vpon the sodeine wealth and alteration of this yong man, the matter first being noted, began afterward more & more to be suspected, and at length, after long and great admiration, was brought vnto Martin Luther, to be examined. The yong man, whether for shame or feare, long denied to confesse, and woulde bee knowne of nothing. Yet God so wrought, being stronger then the Diuell, that he vttered vnto Luther the whole substance of the case, as well touching the money, as the obligation. Luther vnderstanding the matter, and pitiing the lamentable state of the man, willed the whole congregation to pray: and he himselfe ceased not with hys praiers to labour, so that the Diuell was compelled at the last to throw in his obligation at the window, and bade him take it againe vnto him. Which narration, if it be so true as certeinely it is of him reported, I see not the contrary, but that this may well seeme comparable wyth the greatest miracle in Christes Church, that was since the Apostles time.

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Furthermore, as he was mighty in his prayers: so in his Sermons God gaue him such a grace, that when hee preached, they which heard him, thought euery one hys owne temptations seuerally to be noted and touched. 

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See Johannes Sleidan, A famouse cronicle of our time, called Sleidanes Commentaries, trans. John Daus (London, 1560), STC 19894, sigs. G8v-H1r.

Whereof, when signification was geuen vnto him by hys frends, and he demaunded how that could be: mine owne manifold temptations (said he) and experiences are the cause thereof. For this thou must vnderstand (good reader) that Luther, from his tender yeares, was much beaten and exercised with spirituall conflicts, as Melancthon in describing of his life, MarginaliaEx Phil Melanct. in orat funebri. doth testifie. 
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This is taken from A famous and godly history contayning the lyves a[nd] actes of three renowned reformers…, trans. Henry Bennet (London, 1561),STC 1881, sigs. F8v-G1r. For a modern translation of Melanchthon's life of Luther, see Elizabeth Vandiver, Ralph Keen and Thomas D. Frazel, Luther's Lives (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2002), pp. 14-39.

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Also Hieronymus Wellerus, scholer and disciple of the sayd Martin Luther, MarginaliaEx Hierony. Wellero. recordeth, that he oftentimes heard Luther his maister thusreporte of himselfe: that he had bene assaulted and vexed with all kindes of temptations, sauing onely one, which was, with couetousnes. MarginaliaLuther neuer in all his life tempted with coueteousnes With this vice he was neuer (said he) in all his life troubled, nor once tempted. And hetherto concerning the life of Martin Luther: who liued to the yeare of his age 63. MarginaliaM. Luther how long he liued & taught. He continued writing and preachyng, about 29. yeares. As touching the order of his death, the words of Melancthon be these.

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In the yeare of our Lord 1546. and the 17. of February, 

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This is taken from A famous and godly history contayning the lyves a[nd] actes of three renowned reformers…, trans. Henry Bennet (London, 1561), sigs. G1r-G2r.

Doctour Martin Luther sickened a little before supper,. of his accustomed laladie, to wyt, MarginaliaThe sicknes of Luther.of the oppression of humours in the orifice or opening of his stomacke, whereof I remember I haue seene him oft diseasid in this place. This sickenes tooke him after supper, with the which he vehemently contending, required secesse into a bye chamber, and there he rested on his bed two houres, all whych time his paynes encreased. And as Doctor Ionas was lieng in his chamber, Luther awaked, and praied him to rise, and to call vp Ambrose his childrens scholemaister, to make fire in another chamber. Into the which, when he was newly entred, Albert Earle of Mansfield, with hys wife and diuers others (whose names in these letters for haste, were not expressed) at that instant came into hys chamber. MarginaliaThe quiet death of Luther.Finally, feeling his fatall houre to approche, before nine of the clocke in þe morning, the xviij. of February, he cōmended himselfe to God, with this deuout praier.

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¶ The Prayer of Luther at his death.

MarginaliaThe prayer of Luther at his death.MY heauenly father, eternall and mercifull God, thou hast manifested vnto me thy deare sonne, our Lorde Iesus Christ. I haue taught him, I haue knowne him, I loue him as my life, my health, and my redemption: whome the wicked haue persecuted, maligned, and with iniurie afflicted. Draw my soule to thee. After this, he sayd as ensueth, thryse.

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I commend my spirit into thy hands, thou hast redeemed me, O God of truth. GOD so loued the world, that he gaue his only sonne, that all those that beleeue in him, shoulde haue life euerlasting. Iohn. iij.

Hauing repeated oftentimes his prayers, he was called to God, vnto whome so faithfully he commended his spirit, to enioy, no doubt, the blessed societie of the Patriarks, Prophets, and Apostles in the kingdome of God the Father, the Sonne, and the holy Ghost. Let vs now loue the memory of this man, and the doctrine that he hath taught. Let vs learne to bemodest and meeke. Let vs consider the wretched calamities, and marueilous chaunges that shall follow this mishap and dolefull chance. I beseech thee, O sonne of God, crucified for vs, and resuscitated Emanuell, gouerne, cōserue and defend thy Church. Hæc Melancthon.

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MarginaliaThe death of Duke Fridericke.Fridericus Prince Electour died 

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Frederick the Wise's death is from Johannes Sleidan, A famouse cronicle of our time, called Sleidanes Commentaries, trans. John Daus (London, 1560), STC 19848, fo. 56r.

long before Luther, in the yeare of our Lord 1515. leauing no issue behind him, for that he liued a single life, and was neuer maried: wherfore after him succeeded Iohn Fridericke, D. of Saxony. 
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This account of the pontificate of Leo X is translated from John Bale's Catalogus, pp. 636-8 and 644-6.

MarginaliaDisceptatiō betweene the Senate of Strausburgh, and Cardinall Campeius, about married ministers.Mention was made 

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The account of Cardinal Campeggio and of the disputes of Strasbourg is taken from Johannes Sleidan, A famouse cronicle of our time, called Sleidanes Commentaries, trans. John Daus (London, 1560), STC 19848, fo. 48r-v.

a little before, page 859. of the Ministers of Strausburgh, which because of their Mariage, were in trouble and cited by the Bishop, to appeare before him, and there to be iudged without the precinct of the Citie of Strausburgh: wheras there had bene a contrary order taken before betweene the Bishop, and the Citie, that the Bishop should execute no iudgement vpon any, but vnder some of the Magistrates of the said City of Strausburgh. Whereupon the Senate and Citizens taking into their hands the cause of these maried Ministers, in defence of their owne right and liberties, wrote (as is sayd) to their Byshop of Strausburgh, and caused the iudgement thereof a while to be stayed. By reason whereof the matter was brought at lēgth, before Cardinall Campeius Legate, sent by Pope Clemēt to the assemble of Norenberge, an. 1524.

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The chiefe doer in this matter was one Thomas Murnerus, MarginaliaMurnerus a Frier, an accuser of maried ministers. a Franciscane Frier, who had commenced a greeuous complaint against the Senate and Citie of Strausburgh, before the foresayd Cardinall Campeius. MarginaliaThe Senate of Strausburgh purgeth themselues to Cardinall Campeius.Wherefore the Senate, to purge themselues, sent their Ambassadours, thus clearing their cause, and aunswering to theyr accusation: That they neither had bene, nor would be any let to the Byshop, but had signified to him before by theyr letters, that whatsoeuer he could lay against those maried Priests, consonant to the lawe of God, they woulde be no stay, but rather a furtherance vnto him, to proceede in hys action. But the Sentate heerein, was not a little greeued, that the Bishop, contrary to the order and compact, which was taken betweene him and them, did call the sayde Ministers out of the liberties of their Citie: For so it was betweene them agreed, that no Ecclesiasticall person should

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